Postdoctoral Fellowship on History of Migration: Looking for a Tandem Research Partner from North America for 9-month Fellowships in Berkeley, California (deadline: 1 April)

Caner  Tekin's picture
Type: 
Fellowship
Date: 
September 1, 2017
Location: 
California, United States
Subject Fields: 
American History / Studies, Contemporary History, European History / Studies, Immigration & Migration History / Studies, Political Science

Hi everyone. The German Historical Institute in Washington invited me to apply for a 9-month position (for its branch office in Berkeley, info:  https://www.ghi-dc.org/fellowships-programs/fellowships-grants/berkeley-history-of-migration-tandem-program.html?L=0 ) This is a tandem program; one fellow from Germany and another from North America will collaborate on their projects. As the Institute suggested, I am looking for a tandem partner (who will work on his/her own, parallel project). If you would be available for 9 months from September in Berkeley and, in general, if you have a project similar to mine (in terms of research topic or methodology) please send me an email so that we can discuss the details. As I am applying from Germany, I am looking for tandem partners from North America.

My proposal is temporarily entitled as "Representations of Asylum Seekers and the Recent 'Syrian Refugee Crisis' by European Political Camps", the abstract of which you can find below.

Looking forward to hearing from you,

Yours,

Caner

 

Caner Tekin, Ph.D., M.A.

Ruhr University Bochum

Centre for Mediterranean Studies

Caner.Tekin@ruhr-uni-bochum.de

 

Abstract

Contemporary arguments about the asylum seekers in Europe involve dichotomous descriptions of European and national identities. Political elites in the European Union’s member countries, including the ones of migrant origins, express their own views about the accommodation of the asylum seekers coming from the East and South, in particular the war refugees fleeing Syria (henceforth only ‘asylum seekers’), in Europe, according to their identity contexts and the EU’s asylum policy. The present project builds on this standpoint and examines the link between representations of identities and discussions about the asylum seekers in European and national politics. To this end, it first scrutinises the statements raised in the European Parliament and especially in its relevant committees(1)  between April 2015, when the European Council for the first time mentioned the refugee inflow to Europe and the humanitarian tragedies in the Mediterranean as ‘a crisis’(2), and March 2016, the date of the ‘refugee deal’ between the EU and Turkey. This period covers the key plenaries held on the European Union’s asylum policy and its annual budget reserved for the asylum seekers. Second, it analyses statements raised in national politics and reported by the press media in Germany and England between September and December 2015. In this 3-month period lively debates emerged in these countries on the ascending number of Syrian refugees, the European Union’s asylum policy, the negotiations with Turkey about preventing illegal passage to Europe, and the religiously motivated terrorist attacks in Western and Southern Europe. Lastly, both at the European and national levels (in Germany and England), political elites of migrant origin and the media speaking to migrants also publicly joined the discussion on the representations of the asylum seekers and the EU’s ‘refugee crisis’.

The central question addressed in this study is: How did European and national political camps represent asylum seekers in relation to their conceptions of European and national identities in 2015 and 2016? Three subsidiary questions help contextualise the research theme: (1) How did members of the European Parliament discuss asylum seekers in 2015 and 2016 and to what extent did they take into account the political values and principles that their pan-European or national parties stood for? (2) How and with which long-term factors did political camps in Germany and England (including their political elites and members of migrant origin) discuss asylum seekers between September and December 2015? (3) How and to what extend did conceptualisations of refugees, diversity, identities and European integration change in a period marked by the ascending number of asylum seekers, humanitarian tragedies befalling the refugees, and terrorist attacks striking Europe?

 

(1) Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs and Committee of Budgets were two platforms at which various conceptions of refugees were expressed in relation to the existing identities.

(2) Brussels European Council, Statement after the Special Meeting of the European Council, 23 April 2015,www.consilium.europa.eu/en/press/press-releases/2015/04/23-special-euco-... [05.02.2017]

Contact Info: 

 

Caner Tekin, Ph.D., M.A.

Ruhr University Bochum

Centre for Mediterranean Studies

Caner.Tekin@ruhr-uni-bochum.de