Reminder: Adam Matthew Digital Essay Prize Deadline This Friday

Laura Canfield's picture
Type: 
Prize
Subject Fields: 
African American History / Studies, American History / Studies, Atlantic History / Studies, Canadian History / Studies, Colonial America

The second Adam Matthew Digital essay prize consists of £500 plus one-year’s access to one Adam Matthew Digital archival collection chosen by the author. This prize, which began in 2015, will be awarded to the best essay submitted on any subject that relates to the Adam Matthew North American collections. This award is eligible to postgraduates, early career researchers, and independent researchers, although the latter two groups will be prioritised on the grounds that this unique prize offers access to resources they may not otherwise have.

Candidates should submit their essays by 24th February 2017 by e-mail to: awards@baas.ac.uk

The essay should be between 3,000 and 5,000 words in length and relate to a topic covered by any one of Adam Matthew’s North American collectionsMembership of BAAS is mandatory in order to be eligible to receive the prize.

Care should be taken to ensure that the name of the author does not appear on the essay itself, but only in the cover letter which should be submitted by e-mail along with the essay. All essays will be assessed anonymously by a panel drawn from the BAAS Executive Committee.

The essay should form a self-contained piece of writing, suitable for publication as an article in a professional journal. Care should accordingly be taken with matters of presentation and documentation. Prize-winning essays will be offered publication in US Studies Online: the Postgraduate and Early Career Researcher Network and Blog.

You can find the submission guidelines here.

BAAS is committed to promoting best practice in matters of equality and diversity, and will be attentive to issues of equality and diversity when judging applications.

2015 Winner – Patrick J. Doyle (Royal Holloway University, London): “Replacement Rebels: Confederate Substitution and the Issue of Citizenship”