New Open Access Book: How the World Changed Social Media

Alison Fox's picture
Type: 
Online Digital Resources
Subject Fields: 
Anthropology, Communication, Digital Humanities, Social Sciences, Sociology

***************Apologies for any cross-posting***************

UCL Press is delighted to announce the publication of an open access book that may be of interest to members of this list How the World Changed Social Media

Download Free: http://bit.ly/1WTmdvh

This title available in both free open access http://bit.ly/1WTmdvh and print editions (paperback, £15.00, http://bit.ly/1WTmdvh | hardback, £35.00 http://bit.ly/1WTmdvh).

How the World Changed Social Media is the first book in Why We Post, a book series that investigates the findings of anthropologists who each spent 15 months living in communities across the world. This book offers a comparative analysis summarising the results of the research and explores the impact of social media on politics and gender, education and commerce. What is the result of the increased emphasis on visual communication? Are we becoming more individual or more social? Why is public social media so conservative? Why does equality online fail to shift inequality offline? How did memes become the moral police of the internet?

Supported by an introduction to the project’s academic framework and theoretical terms that help to account for the findings, the book argues that the only way to appreciate and understand something as intimate and ubiquitous as social media is to be immersed in the lives of the people who post. Only then can we discover how people all around the world have already transformed social media in such unexpected ways and assess the consequences.

Download a free open access copy: http://bit.ly/1WTmdvh

About the Why We Post

Why do we post on social media? Is it true that we are replacing face-to-face relationships with on-screen life? Are we becoming more narcissistic with the rise of selfies? Does social media create or suppress political action, destroy privacy or become the only way to sell something? And are these claims equally true for a factory worker in China and an IT professional in India?

With these questions in mind, nine anthropologists each spent 15 months living in communities in China, Brazil, Turkey, Chile, India, England, Italy and Trinidad. They studied not only platforms but the content of social media to understand both why we post and the consequences of social media on our lives. Their findings indicate that social media is more than communication – it is also a place where we now live. 

This series explores and compares the results in a collection of ground-breaking and accessible ethnographic studies. To find out more, visit http://www.ucl.ac.uk/why-we-post

Contact Info: 

UCL Press

University College London

Gower Street

London

WC1E 6BT