ANN: New and Forthcoming Publications

Juan Meneses's picture

Dear H-Empire members,

Please continue to send me new and forthcoming publications so that I can include them in this recurrent series of posts.

This is a list of new and forthcoming publications of interest to members:

 

Vivian Blaxell, "Seized Hearts: 'Soft' Japanese Counterinsurgency Before 1945 and Its Persistent Legacies in Postwar Malaya, South Vietnam and Beyond," The Asia-Pacific Journal: Japan Focus 18.6 (2020).

 

Shannon Bontrager, Death at the Edges of Empire: Fallen Soldiers, Cultural Memory, and the Making of an American Nation, 1863-1921 (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2020).

Hundreds of thousands of individuals perished in the epic conflict of the American Civil War. As battles raged and the specter of death and dying hung over the divided nation, the living worked not only to bury their dead but also to commemorate them. President Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address perhaps best voiced the public yearning to memorialize the war dead. His address marked the beginning of a new tradition of commemorating American soldiers and also signaled a transformation in the relationship between the government and the citizenry through an embedded promise and obligation for the living to remember the dead. In Death at the Edges of Empire Shannon Bontrager examines the culture of death, burial, and commemoration of American war dead. By focusing on the Civil War, the Spanish-Cuban-American War, the Philippine-American War, and World War I, Bontrager produces a history of collective memories of war expressed through American cultural traditions emerging within broader transatlantic and transpacific networks. Examining the pragmatic collaborations between middle-class Americans and government officials negotiating the contradictory terrain of empire and nation, Death at the Edges of Empire shows how Americans imposed modern order on the inevitability of death as well as how they used the war dead to reimagine political identities and opportunities into imperial ambitions.

 

Kate Fullagar, The Warrior, the Voyager, and the ArtistThree Lives in an Age of Empire (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2020).

Three interconnected eighteenth-century lives offer a fresh account of the British Empire and its intrusion into Indigenous societies. This engaging history brings together the stories of Joshua Reynolds and two Indigenous men, the Cherokee Ostenaco and the Raiatean Mai. Fullagar uncovers the life of Ostenaco, tracing his emergence as a warrior, his engagement with colonists through war and peace, and his eventual rejection of imperial politics during the American Revolution. She delves into the story of Mai, his confrontation with conquest and displacement, his voyage to London on Cook’s imperial expedition, and his return home with a burning ambition to right past wrongs. Woven throughout is a new history of Reynolds, growing up in Devon near a key port in England, becoming a portraitist of empire, rising to the top of Britain’s art world and yet remaining ambivalent about his nation’s expansionist trajectory.

 

Mark T. Kettler, "What Did Paul Rohrbach Actually Learn in Africa?: The Influence of Colonial Experience on a Publicist’s Imperial Fantasies in Eastern Europe," German History (2020). DOI: 10.1093/gerhis/ghaa013.

 

Juan Meneses, “Toward an Environmental Theory of Afropolitan Literature,” in James Hodapp (ed.), Afropolitan Literature as World Literature (London: Bloomsbury, 2020): 81-98.

 

Scott C. Spencer, Realizing Greater Britain: The South African Constabulary and the Imperial Imposition of the Modern State, 1900-1914 (Oxford: Peter Lang, 2020).

In anticipation of victory over the two Boer republics in the South African War (1899-1902), British imperial policymakers formed the South African Constabulary (SAC, 1900-1908) to lead reconstruction efforts. Uniquely, policymakers injected two goals of imperial management into the force and its 10,000 men, recruited from the British Isles and settler colonies: integrate the conquered territories into the British Empire and foster an imperial-national adherence to a Greater Britain. Following the war, officers and constables attracted the Boers to the empire by suppressing Africans more thoroughly, consistently and systematically than their prior regimes ever had. While some SAC men remained in South Africa following their service, most carried their enhanced white, imperial-national allegiances to the Isles, empire and beyond. Combining traditional archival with innovative digital research, this book narrates global integration and imperial governance through individuals, from Boy Scout founder Robert Baden-Powell and imperialist Alfred Milner to Canadian Mountie Sam Steele, Irish doctor Edward Garraway and, foremost, thousands of SAC men. The author argues that opportunistic British agents carried the apparatus of the coercive, legible and bureaucratic modern state across the British Isles, the empire and the world, leaving challenging legacies for successor governments and former subjects to confront.

 

Members may also be interested in the latest issue of Histoire sociale / Social History.

 

 

NOTE: If you have recently published or have a forthcoming monograph, edited collection, article, book chapter, etc. that deals with imperialism, and you want me to include it on this list, please send me an email at juan.meneses@uncc.edu with basic information: author’s name, title, journal or publisher, year of publication, and a link to access it. In case your publication is a book, you are welcome to include a short abstract. You can also send me information about outstanding recent work that you have read and consider to be of interest to other members of the network. Following the same procedure, please email me entries so I can add them to the list. Posts will feature new lists on a first-come-first-serve basis and will appear with the degree of frequency that the number of items I receive demands.