ANN: New and Forthcoming Publications

Juan Meneses's picture

Dear H-Empire members,

Please continue to send me new and forthcoming publications so that I can include them in this recurrent series of posts.

This is a list of new and forthcoming publications of interest to members:

 

Sayaka Chatani, Nation-Empire: Ideology and Rural Youth Mobilization in Japan and Its Colonies (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2018)

By the end of World War II, hundreds of thousands of young men in the Japanese colonies, in particular Taiwan and Korea, had expressed their loyalty to the empire by volunteering to join the army. Why and how did so many colonial youth become passionate supporters of Japanese imperial nationalism? And what happened to these youth after the war? Nation-Empire investigates these questions by examining the long-term mobilization of youth in the rural peripheries of Japan, Taiwan, and Korea. Personal stories and village histories vividly show youth’s ambitions, emotions, and identities generated in the shifting conditions in each locality. At the same time, Sayaka Chatani unveils an intense ideological mobilization built from diverse contexts—the global rise of youth and agrarian ideals, Japan’s strong drive for assimilation and nationalization, and the complex emotions of younger generations in various remote villages. Nation-Empire engages with multiple historical debates. Chatani considers metropole-colony linkages, revealing the core characteristics of the Japanese Empire; discusses youth mobilization, analyzing the Japanese seinendan (village youth associations) as equivalent to the Boy Scouts or the Hitler Youth; and examines society and individual subjectivities under totalitarian rule. Her book highlights the shifting state-society transactions of the twentieth-century world through the lens of the Japanese Empire, inviting readers to contend with a new approach to, and a bold vision of, empire study.

 

John L. Hennessey, “By Jingo! Methods for Researching Popular Imperialism,” History Compass 17.5 (2019). DOI: 10.1111/hic3.12531.

 

John L. Hennessey, “Imperial Ardor or Apathy? A Comparative International Historiography of Popular Imperialism,” History Compass 17.5 (2019). DOI: 10.1111/hic3.12546.

 

Ian Saxine, Properties of Empire: Indians, Colonists, and Land Speculators on the New England Frontier (New York: NYU Press, 2019)

Properties of Empire shows the dynamic relationship between Native and English systems of property on the turbulent edge of Britain’s empire, and how so many colonists came to believe their prosperity depended on acknowledging Indigenous land rights. Properties of Empire challenges assumptions about the relationship between Indigenous and imperial property creation in early America, as well as the fixed nature of Indian “sales” of land, revealing the existence of a prolonged struggle to re-interpret seventeenth-century land transactions and treaties well into the eighteenth century. The ongoing struggle to construct a commonly agreed-upon culture of landownership shaped diplomacy, imperial administration, and matters of colonial law in powerful ways, and its legacy remains with us today.
 

Ben Silverstein, Governing Natives: Indirect Rule and Settler Colonialism in Australia’s North (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2018)

In the 1930s, a series of crises transformed relationships between settlers and Aboriginal people in Australia's Northern Territory. By the late 1930s, Australian settlers were coming to understand the Northern Territory as a colonial formation requiring a new form of government. Responding to crises of social reproduction, public power, and legitimacy, they re-thought the scope of settler colonial government by drawing on both the art of indirect rule and on a representational economy of Indigenous elimination to develop a new political dispensation that sought to incorporate and consume Indigenous production and sovereignties. This book locates Aboriginal history within imperial history, situating the settler colonial politics of Indigeneity in a broader governmental context.

 

 

Members may also be interested in Histoires coloni@les, by Thierry Anjubault.

 

NOTE: If you have recently published or have a forthcoming monograph, edited collection, article, book chapter, etc. that deals with imperialism, and you want me to include it on this list, please send me an email at juan.meneses@uncc.edu with basic information: author’s name, title, journal or publisher, year of publication, and a link to access it. In case your publication is a book, you are welcome to include a short abstract. You can also send me information about outstanding recent work that you have read and consider to be of interest to other members of the network. Following the same procedure, please email me entries so I can add them to the list. Posts will feature new lists on a first-come-first-serve basis and will appear with the degree of frequency that the number of items I receive demands.