Spring 2022 Courses in Ukrainian Studies (Columbia University)

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SPRING 2022 COURSES IN UKRAINIAN STUDIES

 

BRAND NEW: CREATING IDENTITY IN CONTEMPORARY UKRAINIAN CULTURE

 

Slavic

GU4054

Points: 3

Tuesday and Thursdays, 1:10-2:25PM

Method of Instruction: In-Person

Instructor: Mark Andryczyk

 

This course presents and examines post-Soviet Ukrainian literature.  Students will learn about the significant achievements, names, events, scandals and polemics in contemporary Ukrainian literature and will see how they have contributed to Ukraine's post-Soviet identity.  Students will examine how Ukrainian literature became an important site for experimentation with language, for providing feminist perspectives, for engaging previously-banned taboos, and for deconstructing Soviet and Ukrainian national myths.  Among the writers to be focused on in the course are Serhiy Zhadan, Yuri Andrukhovych, Oksana Zabuzhko and Taras Prokhasko. Centered on the most important successes in literature, the course will also explore key developments in music and visual art of this period. Special focus will be given to how the 2013/2014 Euromaidan revolution and war are treated in today's literature. By also studying Ukrainian literature with regards to its relationship with Ukraine's changing political life, students will obtain a good understanding of the dynamics of today's Ukraine and the development of Ukrainians as a nation in the 21st century. The course will be complemented by audio and video presentations. Entirely in English with a parallel reading list for those who read Ukrainian.

 

Mark Andryczyk can be reached at ma2634@columbia.edu

 

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UKRAINE: POWER POLITICS AND DIPLOMACY

Regional Institute

U8755

Points: 3

Tuesdays, 2:10pm-4:00pm

Method of Instruction: In-Person

Instructor: Valerii Kuchynskyi

 

The seminar-like course consists of three parts: Historical Background, Thematic and Political Issues and Conclusions. It provides historical perspectives on the development of today's Ukraine, analyses the evolution of its politics since Independence and its quest for Euroatlantic integration. While providing an assessment of political, social and economic transformations, the course examines major causes of Euromaidan and the Revolution of Dignity. The current political situation in the country and the ongoing Russian aggression are thoroughly investigated. The results of the 2019 Presidential and Parliamentary election and its impact will also be analyzed in detail. What are the chances by the new Government to reach a "peaceful solution" in the Donbas, eradicate corruption, improve economic situation and implement reforms? Is there a future for the Minsk accords? What's the significance of the Normandy Summit? These and other issues, including behind-the scenes activities, power struggle and diplomatic activities, are dealt with in the newly revised course delivered by a career diplomat. The format of the course will encourage active dialogue and analytical reflection on the part of the students. The professor regularly provides articles and reviews on the latest political developments. During the course each student is to prepare a mid-term and final papers exploring the prospects of Ukraine becoming a free, prosperous, democratic state and a member of European institutions or staying in the zone of Russian influence and the consequences thereof.

 

Ambassador Kuchynskyi can be reached at: vk2187@columbia.edu

 

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AGENT OF CHANGE: UKRAINIAN ART BETWEEN REVOLUTIONS

Slavic

GU4121

Points: 3

Mondays and Wednesdays, 1:10-2:25 pm

Method of Instruction: In-Person

Instructor: Olena Martynyuk

 

The course will trace the appearance of the avant-garde on the territory of the Russian Empire with a focus on Ukrainian art as compared to Russian. Examining the art aspiring not only to reflect but to alter the reality originating both in the center and the periphery, the class will explore the array of strategies employed by art for that end. The foundational theories of avant-garde, non-conformism, and dissident art will be studied alongside the most celebrated and influential examples of innovative and radical art from the region. Beginning with socially minded realist practices, the class will consider the impact of the collapse of the Russian and then Soviet Empires on art and reflect on how the societal upheavals affect the understanding of the function and the definition of art. The appearance of Socialist Realism and the versions of opposition to it will be studied, from dissident undermining to neglect and escapism of the second avant-gardes. Ukrainian art of recent decades will be studied in the context of several revolutions (Granite, Orange, Euromaidan) that defined its contemporary history. The class is offered for graduate and advanced undergraduate students. Knowledge of Russian or Ukrainian is not required.

 

Olena Martynyuk can be reached at om2327@columbia.edu

 

 

ELEMENTARY UKRAINIAN II

Slavic

UN1102

Points: 4

Mondays, Wednesdays, and Thursday,11:40am-12:55am

Method of Instruction: In-Person

Instructor: Yuri Shevchuk

 

Designed for students with little or no knowledge of Ukrainian. Basic grammar structures are introduced and reinforced, with equal emphasis on developing oral and written communication skills. Specific attention to acquisition of high-frequency vocabulary and its optimal use in real-life settings.

 

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INTERMEDIATE UKRAINIAN II

Slavic

UN2102

Points: 4

Mondays, Wednesdays, and Thursday, 10:10am-11:25am

Method of Instruction: In-Person

Instructor: Yuri Shevchuk

 

Prerequisites: UKRN W1102 or the equivalent. Reviews and reinforces the fundamentals of grammar and a core vocabulary from daily life. Principal emphasis is placed on further development of communicative skills (oral and written). Verbal aspect and verbs of motion receive special attention.

 

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ADVANCED UKRAINIAN THROUGH LITERATURE, MEDIA, AND POLITICS II

Slavic

GU4007

Points: 3

Mondays and Wednesdays, 2:40pm-3:55pm

Method of Instruction: In-Person

Instructor: Yuri Shevchuk

 

This content-based modular course is designed to develop students' capacity to use the Ukrainian language as a research and communication tool in a variety of specialized functional and stylistic areas that include literary fiction, scholarly prose, printed and broadcast journalism. It is designed for students with interest in the history, politics, literature, culture and other aspects of contemporary Ukraine, as well as those who plan to do their research, business or reporting about Ukraine. The course is taught in Ukrainian. Being equivalent to an advanced language course, the proposed course will further develop students' proficiency in grammar to enable them to narrate and describe in major time frames with adequate command of aspect. The study of grammar includes patterns of word formation, participle, gerund, an in-depth study of such difficult subjects as verbal aspect, verbs of motion, stylistic and functional stratification of language, communicative sentence perspective.

 

 

Dr. Shevchuk can be reached at: sy2165@columbia.edu

 

 

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Courses at Columbia are open to students from other universities in the New York metropolitan area seeking credit.  Please contact the university at which you enrolled to determine whether it participates in this manner with Columbia University.  Some courses are also open to outside individuals interested in non-credit continuing studies. Additionally, through the Lifelong Learners program, individuals over 65 years of age who are interested in auditing courses, may enroll at a discount rate as Lifelong Learners. Please visit the Columbia University School of Continuing Education (http://www.ce.columbia.edu/auditing/?PID=28) for more details.

 

January 18th is the first day of classes. For more information about courses or the Ukrainian Studies Program at Columbia University, please contact Dr. Mark Andryczyk at ukrainianstudies@columbia.edu or (212) 854-4697.