Painful Truths and Unspoken Words: Remembering Genocides and Holocausts in different genres and regions of the world.

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Type: 
Call for Publications
Date: 
November 30, 2021
Subject Fields: 
Holocaust, Genocide, and Memory Studies, Film and Film History, Colonial and Post-Colonial History / Studies, Human Rights, Literature

 

Initial world responses to the Holocaust included the declaration “never again” (Gilbert, 2000; Reese, 2017; Herman, 2018; Power, 2013). This Special Issue on “Remembering Genocides and the Holocaust” invites contributions from different fields, such as the film, music, museums, and literature. Contributions may explore specific Genocides/ Holocaust representations in their own right or the relationship between representations and lived experiences pertaining to genocide/ holocaust. They may focus on how remembrances of Holocausts and Genocides have been transformed over time, including, but not limited to the globalization, nationalization or privatization of such memories. The following may help illustrate the scope of the Special Issue but are not intended to limit the choice of topic:

Overview: how have portrayals of Holocausts or Genocides changed in response to the activities of political movements or advocacy groups; who decides official labels and categories, including the role of community representatives; issues of societal acceptability of representations; the different conceptual bases in which such representations are grounded and the historical, social, and political underpinnings of such changes, etc.

Genocides/ Holocausts in Film and Media:  representations for in this genre and how these trends reflect changes in the visibility, support, and media coverage of different genocides or holocausts; the politics of such representations (what they seek to portray and the validity of these narratives), etc.

Genocide/Holocaust representations in Literature, memoirs, non-fiction, popular periodicals, and other literary genres: types of literary representations and their limitations; racial/ethnic groups, public figures, and when appropriate, heroines and villains as subjects of such portrayals; comparisons with lived experience and other counternarratives; the framing of genocide/holocaust in this genre  and how such representations may reflect the race/ethnicity/gender of the authors of these representations.

Genocide/Holocaust representations in museums: how these museums portray memories of the Holocaust/Genocide; the location of these representations in other market types; comparisons with lived experience and other counternarratives.

United Nations/Other International Organization and Holocausts/ Genocides: Representations of the United Nations and other international organizations in preventing Genocide/ Holocaust: e.g., as bridges between different racial/ethnic groups or as heralding an ostensible post-conflict era; coalitions and intergroup or international allegiances, e.g., in anti-genocide campaigns.

Global/Regional/ National Representations of Genocide/ the Holocaust. Articles that focus on different regions of the world or different nations.

Representations of Holocaust/Genocide in specific policy contexts: there are diverse ways in which holocaust/ genocide is socially represented in policy settings, e.g., the way genocide/holocaust are/is articulated and constructed in education/ sports and/or entertainment.

Key dates:

Abstract submission deadline: June 30, 2021

Decision on abstracts, July 14, 2021. Email to mmalisa@uwf.edu

Full article submission. November 30, 2021

https://www.mdpi.com/journal/genealogy/special_issues/Genocides_Holocaust

Contact Info: 

Mark Malisa

University of West Florida

11000 University Pkwy, Pensacola,   Fl 32514

Contact Email: