New publications in Ukrainian studies: famine of 1932-1933 (Holodomor)

Iryna Skubii's picture

To commemorate the famine of 1932–1933 in Ukraine, the Holodomor, and victims, survivors, and the losses of the Soviet famines, this week we compiled the list of the recent publications, articles, books, and special journal issues (in alphabetical order) on the history of Ukraine’s Soviet famines, their imperial and colonial legacies, children’s experiences, memory, emotions, and the archival collections and sources to assist the further research.

 

Україна модерна. Документування Голодомору 1932-1933 в Україні: архівні колекції за межами Радянського Союзу. 30 (2021) (please follow the link to access the articles on new archival collections on the Holodomor, research on the international response to the famine, and book reviews).

Boriak, Tetiana. “Victor Kravchenko Trial and Holodomor Oral History: Narrative about the Famine in the Testimonies of Displaced People.” Grani 25 (2022): 27–32. https://doi.org/10.15421/17223

East/West. Journal of Ukrainian Studies. Special issue: "Empire, Colonialism, and Famine in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries." Vol. 8, no. 1 (2021).

Fonzi, Paolo. “‘No German Must Starve’: The Germans and the Soviet Famines of 1931–1933.” Harvard Ukrainian Studies 38, no. 1–2 (2021): 13–44.

Hechter, Michael. “Internal Colonialism, Alien Rule, and Famine in Ireland and Ukraine.” East/West: Journal of Ukrainian Studies 8, no. 1 (April 28, 2021): 145–57. https://doi.org/10.21226/ewjus642.

Hrynevych, Liudmyla, and Andrew Sorokowski (trans.). “Stalin’s Faminogenic Policies in Ukraine: The Imperial Discourse.” East/West: Journal of Ukrainian Studies 8, no. 1 (April 28, 2021): 99–143. https://doi.org/10.21226/ewjus641.

Irvin-Erickson, Douglas. “Raphaël Lemkin, Genocide, Colonialism, Famine, and Ukraine.” East/West: Journal of Ukrainian Studies 8, no. 1 (April 28, 2021): 193–215. https://doi.org/10.21226/ewjus645.

Kasianov, Georgiy. “Holodomor and the Holocaust in Ukraine as Cultural Memory: Comparison, Competition, Interaction.” Journal of Genocide Research 24, no. 2 (April 3, 2022): 216–27. https://doi.org/10.1080/14623528.2021.1968146.

Kis, Oksana. “Women’s Experience of the Holodomor: Challenges and Ambiguities of Motherhood.” Journal of Genocide Research 23, no. 4 (October 2, 2021): 527–46. https://doi.org/10.1080/14623528.2020.1834713.

Klid, Bohdan. “Empire-Building, Imperial Policies, and Famine in Occupied Territories and Colonies.” East/West: Journal of Ukrainian Studies 8, no. 1 (April 28, 2021): 11–32. https://doi.org/10.21226/ewjus634.

Kuzovova, Natalia. “Childhood during the Holodomor 1932–1933 in Ukraine (in the South of Ukraine).” Journal of Family History 47, no. 1 (January 1, 2022): 59–77. https://doi.org/10.1177/03631990211020339.

Manley, Rebecca, and Iryna Skubii. “‘We Did Not Shrink From Eating Carrion:’ Food Disgust And Early Soviet Famines.” In Cultural Approaches to Disgust and the Visceral, edited by Max Ryynänen, Heidi Kosonen, and Susanne Ylönen, 119–30. New York: Routledge, 2022.

Mattingly, Daria. “Recollections May Vary: Researching Perpetrators Accounts of the 1932–1933 Famine.” In Researching Memory and Identity in Russia and Eastern Europe: Interdisciplinary Methodologies, edited by Jade McGlynn and Oliver T. Jones, 109–23. Palgrave Macmillan Memory Studies. Cham: Springer International Publishing, 2022. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-99914-8_7.

Ogiienko, Vitalii. “The Memorial Topography of the Holodomor between Cumulative and Cultural Trauma: A Genealogical Approach.” In Image, History and Memory. Routledge, 2022.

Pauly, Matthew D. “Curative Mythmaking: Children’s Bodies, Medical Knowledge, and the Frontier of Health in Early Soviet Odesa.” East/West: Journal of Ukrainian Studies 9, no. 2 (October 26, 2022): 145–83. https://doi.org/10.21226/ewjus597.

Sysyn, Frank E., and Andrea Graziosi. Genocide: The Power and Problems of a Concept. Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2022.