The H-CivWar Authors' Blog

Is Thomas Livermore Trustworthy?: A Story about Memory, Memoirs, and the Civil War

The H-CivWar Authors' Blog

I recently completed Thomas Livermore’s Days and Events 1860-1866 because it is, to my knowledge, the only memoir written by a veteran of the 5th New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry. Livermore served with the regiment from its inception, starting as a 17-year-old 1st Sergeant and working his way up to Captain before obtaining a series of staff appointments, mainly with the II and XVIII Corps.

Getting Down to (or Bogged Down by?) Research Basics

The H-CivWar Authors' Blog

In this post for the H-CivWar Author's Blog, Lois Leveen seeks input on how different historians organize the information (and insights!) they amass while researching book projects.

 

What am I doing? What should I be doing?  How should I be doing it?

I do not mean these as existential questions, but rather as desperately practical ones.

"The Social and Cultural Dynamics of Soldiering": The 5th New Hampshire versus the Texas Brigade

The H-CivWar Authors' Blog

In his last post, Hugh Dubrulle compared the social composition of the 5th New Hampshire to the Texas Brigade. At the conclusion of that post, he surmised that substantial differences in social composition helped explain important differences in the culture of the units—especially the relationship between officers and men. Here he continues to explore these differences by highlighting the contrasts in the cultures of the two units.

“A War between Classes”: The 5th New Hampshire versus the 1st Texas

The H-CivWar Authors' Blog

In this post for the H-CivWar Author's Blog, Hugh Dubrulle of Saint Anselm College discusses one question relevant to his work on how the 5th New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry dealt with trauma: what was it about the regiment's social composition and culture that allowed it to suffer huge losses and keep fighting? In responding to this question, Dubrulle compares the social composition of the 5th New Hampshire to another famed Civil War regiment, the 1st Texas.

The Ever-Evolving Dissertation – Researching how Unionism was Enforced

The H-CivWar Authors' Blog

In this inaugural post for the H-CivWar Author's Blog, Daniel Farrell, Ph.D. Candidate at the University of Cincinnati, introduces his dissertation project, emphasizing how early-stage research projects can quickly take on new directions.

Studying Civil War Trauma through the 5th New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry

The H-CivWar Authors' Blog

In this post for the H-CivWar Author's Blog, Hugh Dubrulle introduces his research on the 5th New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry and how individual soldiers in the regiment, along with the unit as a whole, dealt with trauma during the Civil War.

 

Documenting the Life of an Elusive African American Civil War Spy

The H-CivWar Authors' Blog

To begin H-CivWar's new author's blog, in which contributors will document our triumphs and tribulations as we work on our current book projects, public humanities scholar Dr. Lois Leveen introduces us to her work documenting the life of the elusive African America Civil War spy most often (erroneously) referred to as Mary Bowser.