Monthly Publications Update: May 2018

David Prior's picture

Steidl, Annemarie, Wladimir Fischer-Nebmaier, James Oberly.  From a Multiethnic Empire to a Nation of Nations. Austro-Hungarian Migrants in the US, 1870–1940.  Innsbruck: Studien-Verlag, 2017.

(Global, Transnational, Comparative - North America, United States, Austria-Hungary, Central Europe - Identity Management, Demography, Migration, Gender, Media - South Slavic nationalisms - Quantitative Analysis, Discourse Analysis, Historical-Critical Method.) 

Today, the history of Austro-Hungarian migrants is torn between US history and Central European histories. It struggles between quantitative social history and community, and micro-history. It is torn between ethnic and social history. This book was written to reintegrate the history of Austro-Hungarian migrants to the US while avoiding cultural essentialism.

The volume tries to include all ethnic identifications deriving from Austro-Hungary, but with a critical take on the concept of ethnicity. Thereby, the concept of ""identity management"" is proposed in this book.

Groups of migrants themselves were by no means homogeneous. Taking South-Slavic speaking migrants as a case study, rather than discussing what ethnicity is, the question was therefore, who made someone ethnic, who created ethnic groups and how?

All chapters either have a transatlantic perspective or are even structured in order to reflect the moves and connections over the Atlantic sea. The analysis is based on mixed sources and mixed methods, from census data and shipping lists to migrant newsletters and correspondences.

http://www.studienverlag.at/page.cfm?vpath=buecher/buchdetail&titnr=5477

 

Steidl, Annemarie, Wladimir Fischer-Nebmaier, James Oberly.  From a Multiethnic Empire to a Nation of Nations. Austro-Hungarian Migrants in the US, 1870–1940.  Innsbruck: Studien-Verlag, 2017.

(Global, Transnational, Comparative - North America, United States, Austria-Hungary, Central Europe - Identity Management, Demography, Migration, Gender, Media - South Slavic nationalisms - Quantitative Analysis, Discourse Analysis, Historical-Crotical Method  - .) 

Today, the history of Austro-Hungarian migrants is torn between US history and Central European histories. It struggles between quantitative social history and community, and micro-history. It is torn between ethnic and social history. This book was written to reintegrate the history of Austro-Hungarian migrants to the US while avoiding cultural essentialism.

The volume tries to include all ethnic identifications deriving from Austro-Hungary, but with a critical take on the concept of ethnicity. Thereby, the concept of ""identity management"" is proposed in this book.

Groups of migrants themselves were by no means homogeneous. Taking South-Slavic speaking migrants as a case study, rather than discussing what ethnicity is, the question was therefore, who made someone ethnic, who created ethnic groups and how?

All chapters either have a transatlantic perspective or are even structured in order to reflect the moves and connections over the Atlantic sea. The analysis is based on mixed sources and mixed methods, from census data and shipping lists to migrant newsletters and correspondences.

http://www.studienverlag.at/page.cfm?vpath=buecher/buchdetail&titnr=5477

 

Fischer-Nebmaier, Wladimir.  Identitätsmanagement von südslavischen MigrantInnen aus Österreich-Ungarn in den USA, ca. 1890–1940.  In Migrationsregime vor Ort und lokales Aushandeln von Migration, edited by Jochen Oltmer, 189-218. Wiesbaden: Springer VS, 2018.

(Global, Transnational, Comparative - USA, Austria-Hungary - Identity Management, Migration - Gender, Media - Discourse Analysis, Text Analysis.) 

Wie organisierten sich transatlantische MigrantInnen aus Österreich-Ungarn in den USA? Welche Spuren haben sie hinterlassen? Was sagen quantitative Quellen über die MigrantInnen aus? Kann man rekonstruieren, wie sie sich identifizierten? Wenn ja, wie? Und wenn nein, was können wir dann über Identifikationsprozesse der Vergangenheit sagen?

Dieser Aufsatz beruht auf Forschungen für das Projekt ‚Understanding the Migration Experience: The Austrian-American Connection, 1870–1914‘. Der Aufsatz legt einige strategische Entscheidungen des Projektteams dar, erklärt die methodische Herangehensweise des Projektes, um dann die südslavisch-sprachige migrantische Öffentlichkeit in den USA vorzustellen und schließlich anhand eines bestimmten Bereiches (Heiratsmanagement) zu zeigen, wie diese Öffentlichkeit funktionierte.

Dabei können wir zwar nicht zur authentischen ‚Stimme‘ der MigrantInnen vordringen. Aber wir können sehen, dass kollektive migrantische Akteure politisch wirkten und damit eine relativ lange Zeit relativ erfolgreich waren, wenn wir uns auf das Studium der Diskurse und Infrastrukturen migrantischer Eliten einlassen, aber auch die Analyse der Statistiken des Zensus nicht vernachlässigen.

https://www.springer.com/de/book/9783658189440

 

Stergar, Rok, and Tamara Scheer.  Ethnic Boxes: The Unintended Consequences of Habsburg Bureaucratic Classification.  Nationalities Papers 46:4 (2018): 575-591.

(Europe (excl. Russia and the former Soviet Union) - Habsburg Empire - Ethnic Nationalism - Identifications - Historical Analysis.) 

The classificatory efforts, which accompanied the modernisation of the Habsburg state, were instrumental in establishing, promoting, and perpetuating national categories of identification. This was not an articulated position; most of it happened inadvertently and the results were often contrary to the intentions of the Habsburg bureaucracy. The state did not create nations but its classification of languages made some ethnolinguistic identity categories available and nationalist used them to make political claims. The institutionalisation of these categories also made them more relevant, especially as the nationalist movements simultaneously worked toward the same goal. Yet, identification did not follow an algorithmic logic, In the beginning of the twentieth century, sometimes sooner, various nationalisms could undoubtedly mobilise large numbers of people in Austria-Hungary; but people still had agency and nation-ness remained contingent and situational.

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00905992.2018.1448374

 

Maxwell, Alexander.  Nationalism as Classification: Suggestions for Reformulating Nationalism Research.  Nationalities Papers 46:4 (2018): 539-555.

(Global, Transnational, Comparative - Eastern Europe - Nationalism as Classification - Nationalism Theory - Historiographic Survey - .) 

Instead of thinking about “national identity,” scholars of nationalism would do well to study nationalism as a process of classification, treating national conflict as disputes over nationalized categories. Disputes over national classification take various forms: patriots argue over which category applies, which categories exist, and which categories have which status. Techniques for imposing classificatory categories also deserve attention. The contributors to this themed issue of Nationalities Papers illustrate the power of analysis based on classification.

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00905992.2018.1448376

 

Maxwell, Alexander.  Effacing Panslavism: Linguistic Classification and Historiographic Misrepresentation.  Nationalities Papers 46:4 (2018): 633-653.

(Europe (excl. Russia and the former Soviet Union) - Slovakia, Croatia - Linguistic nationalism - Panslavism, Slavic - Textual Analysis - Historiography.) 

In the early nineteenth century, several Slavic intellectuals believed in a single Slavic nation speaking a single language, though positing various taxonomies of the nation’s component “tribes” and the language’s component “dialects.” Nevertheless, recent scholars, both historians and linguists, prove so extraordinarily unwilling to acknowledge the existence of Panslavism that several falsify the historical record so as to make historical figures conform to modern national and linguistic thinking. This paper discusses Jan Kollár, Ljudevit Gaj, and Ľudovít Štúr as three sample Panslavs, documents the misrepresentation of their ideas in recent historiography, and explores why so many scholars seek to erase Panslavism from the historical record.

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00905992.2017.1374360

 

Leerssen, Joep (ed.).  Encyclopedia of Romantic Nationalism in Europe.  Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press, 2016.

(Europe (excl. Russia and the former Soviet Union) - Europe - Cultural nationalism - Entangled history - Historical analysis - Cultural transfer, comparative history, network analysis.) 

A large-scale, 2-volume, 1500-page survey of the role of cultural production in the 19th-century development of nationalism in Europe. The countries surveyed range from Iceland to Azerbaijan, the cultural fields from philology to music and from literature to archeology.

http://www.uva.nl/en/content/news/press-releases/2018/05/culture-disseminated-nationalism-...

 

Gibson, Catherine.  Shading, Lines, Colours: Mapping Ethnographic Taxonomies of European Russia, 1851-1875.  Nationalities Papers 46:4 (2018): 592-611.

(Russia and the former Soviet Union - Eastern Europe, European Russia - Science and Nationalism - Cartography.) 

This article explores the role of maps in the construction and development of ethnographic taxonomies in the mid-century Russian Empire. A close reading of two ethnographic maps of “European Russia” produced by members of the Imperial Russian Geographical Society, Petr Keppen (1851) and Aleksander Rittikh (1875), is used to shine a spotlight on the cartographical methods and techniques (lines, shading, color, hatching, legends, text, etc.) employed to depict, construct, and communicate these taxonomies. In doing so, this article draws our attention to how maps impacted visual and spatial thinking about the categories of ethnicity and nationality, and their application to specific contexts and political purposes within the Empire. Through an examination of Keppen’s and Rittikh’s maps, this article addresses the broader question of why cartography came to be regarded as such a powerful medium through which to communicate and consolidate particular visions of an ethnographic landscape.

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00905992.2017.1364229

 

Lonergan, Gayle.  Counting citizens: the transfer and translation of census categories from the international statistical congresses to the principality of Bulgaria (1872–1888).  Nationalities Papers 26:4 (2018): 556-574.

(Europe (excl. Russia and the former Soviet Union) - Ottoman Empire, Southeast Europe, Balkans - Civic and Ethnic Nationalism - Censuses and Statistics.) 

This paper examines the nineteenth-century census as an early information technology and a medium for the transnational exchange of ideas in the nineteenth century. In particular, it considers how the ideas discussed by the International Statistical Congresses were directly applied in the newly established kingdom of Bulgaria in the first censuses from 1881 to 1888. It then examines how the legacy of Ottoman rule and the categories of the nineteenth-century Ottoman censuses unconsciously influenced the first census of Bulgaria, despite the desire of the new rulers to mark a significant break with the past. It also demonstrates how the nationalist feeling in the multi-ethnic former territory of the Ottoman Empire influenced the seemingly neutral categories of the first census. These categories then began to produce an implicit representation of the ideal Bulgarian citizen and so started the process of exclusion of the Turkish-speaking or Muslim population from full membership of the new body politic.

Keywords: Bulgaria, International Statistical Congress, census, national identity, ethnicity, minorities, Turks

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00905992.2017.1326892

 

Davis, Sacha.  Hospitality networks, British travel writers, and the dissemination of competing Transylvanian claims to civilization, 1830s–1930s.  Nationalities Papers 46:4 (2018): 612-632.

(Europe (excl. Russia and the former Soviet Union) - Balkanism, travelogues, Hungarian, Saxon, Romanian - Nationalist Representations.) 

Hungarian, Saxon, and Romanian nationalist activists in Transylvania disseminated competing claims to “Westernness” by swaying visiting British travel writers’ descriptions through hospitality networks that guided what writers saw and heard, assuring that travelers favored the nationalists’ classifications of the region’s ethnicities. Although the qualities British travelers valued varied depending on individual differences and intellectual currents such as enlightened reform, scientific racism, and the romantic revival, travelers consistently ascribed the qualities they best favored to the nationality on whose hospitality they relied. Wealth and time of travel determined which hospitality networks travelers favored. The Hungarian noble elites hosted most travelers until 1918, when the newly dominant Romanian nobility replaced them. Throughout, peasant voices especially remained marginalized.

https://doi.org/10.1080/00905992.2018.1448375

 

Kostantaras, Dean.  Nationalism and Social Class.  The State of Nationalism/Studies on National Movements (2018).

(Global, Transnational, Comparative - International - Theories of Nationalism.) 

https://stateofnationalism.eu/article/nationalism-and-social-class/