ANN: Berlin Brandenburg Colloquium on Environmental History Summer 2021 (online)

Jan-Henrik Meyer's picture

Berlin Brandenburg Colloquium on Environmental History Summer 2021 (online)

The Berlin Brandenburg Colloquium on Environmental History offers an open, local as well as international forum for the discussion of environmental history research in the German capital region. Three of the five sessions are part of a mini-series on usable pasts in the history of technology and environmental history, involving the opportunity for interactive discussion and engagement. Two sessions are devoted to the history of nuclear issues - Uranium mining and conflicts a local nuclear plant sites.

The colloquium will be fully online. Please e-mail us to meyer@zzf-potsdam.de and we will send you the login data.

Program

Monday, 19.04.2021
Usable Pasts. Part I
Per Högselius (Stockholm, Sweden)
Why historians of technology and environment can and must engage in the public debate (in English)

MONDAY 4-6 p.m. – Contribution to the ASEH Environmental History Week

 

Wednesday, 19.05.2021
Usable Pasts. Part II Uses of History - A dialogue between the environmental policy research and practice (in German)
Vom Nutzen der Vergangenheit. Ein Dialog zwischen Umweltpolitik-Forschung und -Praxis
Karena Kalmbach (Berlin) Zwischen Politikberatung und Main-Stream Geschichtswissenschaft: Wohin will die Umwelt- und Technikgeschichte?
Klaus Müschen (Berlin) Anekdoten, Geschichten, Gedächtnis – Wie können wir für die 2. Halbzeit der Energiewende lernen?

Wednesday, 26.05.2021
Usable Pasts. Part III (in English)
Roundtable: What can environmental history and the history of technology contribute to today’s challenges – and how?

Christoph Bernhardt (Erkner), Julia Obertreis (Erlangen), Heike Weber (Berlin), Timothy Moss (Berlin)

Wednesday, 09.06.2021
Sabine Loewe-Hannatzsch (Freiberg) (in German)
Neue Perspektiven auf den Umgang mit Umweltproblemen im Uranerzbergbau der DDR, 1949-1991 / New perspectives on dealing with nuclear problems of GDR Uranium Mining (1949-91)

Wednesday, 23.06.2021
Christian Götter (München) (in German)
Kernenergie im Zentrum gesellschaftlicher Konflikte. Öffentliche Debatten in der BRD und Großbritannien im Vergleich (1956-1989) / Nuclear energy at the heart of societal conflicts? Public debates in West Germany and the UK

Ort: ONLINE. Please send us an email to obtain Zoom login information.

Time 6-8 p.m. CET (Berlin / Brussels / Paris)
Contact us:

 Astrid M. Kirchhof astrid.m.kirchhof@hu-berlin.de
Jan-Henrik Meyer meyer@zzf-potsdam.de

 

Abstracts:


Miniseries: 
Usable Pasts - Insights from environmental history and the history of technology for today's challenges

Abstract:
This mini-series of online events, entitled “Usable Pasts – Insights from environmental history and the history of technology for today’s challenges”, explores the potential – and pitfalls – of enrolling these fields of scholarship to inform, challenge and inspire responses to the climate and environmental crises of our day. It is motivated by the conviction that historians have an important contribution to make to this societal challenge and that their voices need to be better articulated for them to be heard and considered. The organisers invite historians, non-historians and practitioners to exchange ideas and experiences around the practice of using historical knowledge to address modern-day issues. The overarching purpose of the mini-series is to specify what and how historians of technology and the environment can contribute to current debates on the environmental and climate crises and their resolution. The following questions are designed to guide the presentations and inspire the discussions:
- What selective or simplistic histories of the environment permeate the thinking of policy-makers, business leaders and opinion-setters and how can they be challenged by historians?
- What helpful analogies to past crises exist and what false analogies should be subjected to criticism?
- In what ways do ‘presentist’ framings of the climate/environment crisis limit our ability to understand its characteristics and potential responses?
- What legacies from the past – institutional, cultural, political, socio-economic, material – constrain action or restrict options for addressing the climate/environment crises?
- What lost or discarded alternatives from the past could enrich our response to climate and environmental change?
- What risks do historians need to be aware of when engaging with contemporary debates on environmental or climate policy and practice?
Historical scholarship cannot be expected to provide ready-made solutions to the climate crisis and, indeed, is not equipped to do so. However, it can help practitioners rethink the present, encouraging them to appreciate the temporal context of their aspirations, reflect upon the implications of their actions and reframe their discourses. Taking first steps along this path is the ambition of this mini-series.
Organised in cooperation with Christoph Bernhardt, Julia Obertreis, Heike Weber and Timothy Moss.


Montag, 19.04.2021 Usable Pasts Part I
Per Högselius (Stockholm, Sweden)
Why historians of technology and environment can and must engage in the public debate
Contribution to the ASEH Environmental History Week;
Co-hosted by the Colloquium on Environmental History and the History of Technology, Heike Weber, TU-Berlin
Abstract:
In this talk I will argue that historians are not well equipped to come up with concrete policy advice or propose solutions to various present-day problems. However, historians are well equipped to engage and participate in the public debate in more indirect ways. I will argue that they can do so in two main ways, which are important to separate from each other: empirically and theoretically. Empirically, historians can enrich the debate by “zooming out”, temporally and spatially. Actors and analysts of current affairs are often surprisingly unaware of the wider historical context in which many burning issues of the present are part. Worse, they often mobilize distorted and “fake” histories to advance their arguments. Clearly, historians have a moral duty to oppose this by unpacking the historical complexity of the present. Based on examples from the fields of energy and water history, I argue that it can be extremely fruitful to do so not merely by writing opinion pieces or giving radio and TV interviews, but rather by making the link between past and present explicit in their academic books and articles. Theoretically, historians can mobilize concepts and theoretical ideas generated in the context of historical research, and apply them to present-day burning issues. This creates a basis for systematically engaging in debates about analogies between current issues and historical events. In this case there is no need for an empirical overlap, in the sense that conceptualizations of, say, medieval forestry can be of relevance for engaging in twenty-first century debates about electrical vehicles. Theory-based analogies can and should be mobilized not only for developing new “perspectives” on current affairs, but also for warning present-day actors about what can go wrong. Unfortunately, many false and “fake” analogies are always circulating, and over-simplifications are common. Paradoxically, however, I argue that at the theoretical level, historians actually need to simplify in order to make sense of their contributions to the debate.
Short Bio:
Per Högselius is Professor of History of Technology and International Relations at KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm. Working at the intersection between history of technology and environmental history, he has written on European & global energy history, natural resource extraction in colonial settings, transnational infrastructures in their cultural & political context, coastal history & the transnational Baltic Sea region. His books include: Red Gas: Russia and the Origins of European Energy Dependence (2013), Europe’s Infrastructure Transition: Economy, War, Nature (2016, with Arne Kaijser & Erik van der Vleuten) and Energy and Geopolitics (2019).


Wednesday, 19.05.2021 Usable Pasts. Part II
Vom Nutzen der Vergangenheit. Ein Dialog zwischen Umweltpolitik-Forschung und -Praxis
Karena Kalmbach (Berlin) Zwischen Politikberatung und Main-Stream Geschichtswissenschaft: Wohin will die Umwelt- und Technikgeschichte?
Klaus Müschen (Berlin) Anekdoten, Geschichten, Gedächtnis – Was können wir für die 2. Halbzeit der Energiewende lernen?
Abstract:
Welche Erkenntnisse und Impulse können für heute aus vergangenen Erlebnissen und deren geschichtswissenschaftlicher Aufarbeitung gewonnen werden? Bei dieser deutschsprachigen Veranstaltung steht der Austausch zwischen wissenschaftlich Forschenden und politisch Handelnden im Vordergrund, und zwar als Dialog zwischen einer Umwelt- und Technikhistorikerin einerseits und dem ehemaligen Leiter einer städtischen Energiebehörde andererseits. Nach einführenden Kurzstatements geht es um den Austausch im Gespräch miteinander. Anschließend wird eine offene Diskussionsrunde die Gelegenheit für alle bieten, Fragen an die beiden zu stellen, Anregungen aus ihren Beiträgen aufzugreifen und eigene Ideen in die Diskussion einzubringen.
Short Bios:
Karena Kalmbach ist Juniorprofessorin an der Technischen Universität Eindhoven. Ihre Fachgebiete umfassen Sozial- und Kulturgeschichte der Technik und Umwelt (mit besonderem Schwerpunkt auf Nukleargeschichte) sowie Geschichts- und Erinnerungspolitik. An der TU Eindhoven leitet Karena Kalmbach eine interdisziplinäre Forschungsgruppe, die untersucht, wie Angst technologische Innovationen antreibt. Im Januar 2021 erschien ihr neuestes Buch "The Meanings of a Disaster: Chernobyl and Its Afterlives in Britain and France" im Verlag Berghahn Books. Im April 2021 wird Karena Kalmbach die Leitung der Stabsstelle "Strategie und Inhalte" am Futurium in Berlin übernehmen.
Klaus Müschen arbeitet seit 40 Jahren im Klimaschutz und zur Energiewende, derzeit in einem Projekt "Halbzeit Energiewende - Zukunft lernen: Klimaschutz und Energiewende als Transformationsfeld" des Forschungszentrums für Umweltpolitik (FFU) der FU Berlin, Wuppertal-Institut und Öko-Institut. Von 2006 bis 2016 leitete er die Abteilung „Klimaschutz und Energie“ am Umweltbundesamt in Dessau, von 1989 bis 2005 das Referat Klimaschutz und Energieplanung der Senatsverwaltung für Stadtentwicklung und Umweltschutz des Landes Berlin. In dieser Zeit vertrat er Berlin im Aufsichtsrat der Berliner Energieagentur.
 

Wednesday, 26.05.2021 Usable Pasts. Part III
Roundtable: What can environmental history and the history of technology contribute to today’s challenges – and how?
Christoph Bernhardt (Erkner), Julia Obertreis (Erlangen), Heike Weber (Berlin), Timothy Moss (Berlin)
Moderators: Astrid Kirchhof & Jan-Henrik Meyer

Abstract:
This roundtable event provides an opportunity for all participants to give their own responses and ideas to the following questions that frame the mini-series on usable pasts of environmental history and the history of technology:
1. What selective or simplistic histories of the environment permeate the thinking of policy-makers, business leaders and opinion-setters and how can they be challenged by historians?
2. What helpful analogies to past crises exist and what false analogies should be subjected to criticism?
3. In what ways do ‘presentist’ framings of the climate/environment crisis limit our ability to understand its characteristics and potential responses?
4. What legacies from the past – institutional, cultural, political, socio-economic, material – constrain action or restrict options for addressing the climate/environment crises?
5. What lost or discarded alternatives from the past could enrich our response to climate and environmental change?
6. What risks do historians need to be aware of when engaging with contemporary debates on environmental or climate policy and practice?
Rather than responding to prepared inputs, participants are encouraged to consider answers to the above and additional questions of their own in advance of the event, so that – in true roundtable style – everyone is given the space to reflect upon these issues and engage with the comments of others.

Wednesday, 09.06.2021 Sabine Loewe-Hannatzsch (Freiberg)
Neue Perspektiven auf den Umgang mit Umweltproblemen im Uranerzbergbau der DDR, 1949-1991
Abstract:
Die Stilllegung, Sanierung und Rekultivierung der ehemaligen Urangewinnungs- und Uranaufbereitungsanlagen in Sachsen und Thüringen wird seit 1991 von der Wismut GmbH, als Nachfolgerin des einstigen Bergbaubetriebes, durchgeführt. Die großflächig radioaktiv kontaminierten und mit Schwermetallen belasteten Gebiete stellen nicht erst seit 1991 größte ökologische und ökonomische Probleme dar. Bereits seit den 1950er Jahren befasste sich die Wismut mit der Wiederurbarmachung stillgelegter Halden, Absetzbecken, Schächte und der enormen Verschmutzung des Wassers. Aber welche Maßnahmen wurden umgesetzt und konnten überhaupt umgesetzt werden? Welche Qualität und Quantität hatten diese Maßnahmen? Zudem stellt sich die Frage nach der Verantwortung? Erste Ergebnisse zeigen, dass sich ein Geflecht aus Betriebsleitungen, der Generaldirektion der Wismut, Bezirksorganen, Ministerien und verschiedenen Kommissionen mit dieser Problematik auseinandersetzte und Entscheidungen traf, die die Entwicklung der Umweltverschmutzung im Wismut-Gebiet beeinflussten. Letztendlich ist es aber auch notwendig die gesamte Umweltproblematik des Uranerzbergbaus der DDR in einen deutsch-deutschen und internationalen Kontext einzuordnen.

Kurzbiographie:
Sabine Loewe-Hannatzsch ist Projektleiterin des Teilprojekt: „Umweltpolitik im Uranerzbergbau der SAG/SDAG Wismut 1949-1990“ im Rahmen des BMBF-Projekts "Umweltpolitik, Bergbau und Rekultivierung im deutsch-deutschen Vergleich. Das Lausitzer Braunkohlenrevier, die WISMUT und das Ruhrgebiet (1949-1989/2000)". Sie ist Absolventin der University of San Diego (Europäische Geschichte, BA Internationale Beziehungen, MA) und hat an der Universität Mannheim über „Sicherheit Denken – Entspannungspolitik auf der Zweiten Ebene 1969-1990“ (publiziert 2019) promoviert.
Aktuelle Publikationen: Sabine Loewe-Hannatzsch: „Umweltpolitik im Uranerzbergbau der SAG/SDAG Wismut in der DDR“, Der Anschnitt-Zeitschrift für Montangeschichte, 3-4/2020, S. 99-120; „Sicherheit Denken – Entspannungspolitik auf der Zweiten Ebene 1969-1990“, Peter Lang Verlag, 2019; „Perception of the other: ‘Kremlinologists’ and ‘Westerners’— East and West German analysts and their mutual perceptions, 1977–1985“, in: Poul Villaume and Oliver Bange (eds.): The Long Détente, CEP 2017.

Mittwoch, 23.06.2021 Christian Götter (München)
Kernenergie im Zentrum gesellschaftlicher Konflikte. Öffentliche Debatten in der BRD und Großbritannien im Vergleich (1956-1989)
Abstract:
Kernenergie wurde nie allein als eine Energietechnologie unter vielen diskutiert. Sie wurde vielmehr teils gezielt, teils unabsichtlich, von ihren Befürwortern wie auch Kritikern mit grundlegenden gesellschaftlichen Konflikten verbunden. Die öffentlichen Debatten über die Technologie wurden so zu Sonden für das Selbstverständnis der sie diskutierenden Gesellschaften, ihre Debattenkultur, ihr Demokratieverständnis und ihre Zukunftsvorstellungen. Der Vortrag betrachtet dies am Beispiel ausgewählter Kernkraftstandorte in der Bundesrepublik und Großbritannien in vergleichender Perspektive.

Kurzbiographie:
Christian Götter ist Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter im Forschungsinstitut für Wissenschafts- und Technikgeschichte am Deutschen Museum von Meisterwerken der Naturwissenschaft und Technik in München. Er bearbeitet dort das vom Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung geförderte Projekt ‚Gespaltene Gesellschaft – Die lokale Geschichte der Kernenergie in Deutschland und Großbritannien‘. Ziel des Projektes ist es, den komplexen Verläufen der Debatten um die Kernenergie an Standorten von Kernkraftwerken nachzugehen und die hier verhandelten Fragen zu fokussieren, die bei Untersuchungen der Auseinandersetzungen auf nationaler Ebene oftmals zu kurz kommen. Zuvor war Christian Götter als wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter am Institut für Geschichtswissenschaft der TU Braunschweig beschäftigt, wo er 2014 mit einer Arbeit zum Thema ‚Die Macht der Wirkungsannahmen. Medienarbeit des britischen und deutschen Militärs in der ersten Hälfte des 20. Jahrhunderts‘ promoviert wurde. Studiert hat er Neuere und Neueste Geschichte, Alte Geschichte und Medienwissenschaften an der Hochschule für Bildende Künste, Braunschweig, der Technischen Universität Braunschweig und der Háskóli Íslands, Reykjavík.