Pittsburgh NEMLA CFP: naufragios

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Shipwreck in Early Modern Hispanic Literature and Culture (Roundtable)

 

http://www.buffalo.edu/nemla.html


 
Chair(s)

Carrie Ruiz (Colorado College)

Abstract

The primary focus of this round-table will be on the representation of shipwreck in Early Modern Hispanic Literature and Culture. Papers should address how the recurrence of the shipwreck motif in the cultural productions of Spain and Spanish-America between the 16th and 17th centuries is inscribed in a larger nautical collective imaginary that stems from specific social and historical conditions related to maritime expansion, mercantile interests, and warfare. In addition to social-historical circumstances, presenters may explore the topos of shipwreck in relation to classical antiquity tradition to understand how and with what purpose it is reformulated in the 16th and 17th centuries. Papers should address the symbolic implications of the thematic motif in relation to artistic and ideological purpose. Papers may focus on the implementation of the shipwreck motif as a means to question imperial expansion and transoceanic trade, as didactic tool for moral messages, as metaphor of the voyage of life and the turbulent waters of fortune, or in relation to notions of gender and identity. Presenters may explore the significance of shipwreck in a variety of Hispanic cultural products such as cartography, paintings, and/or literature. Papers may be proposed in English or Spanish. Transatlantic and interdisciplinary approaches welcomed.

Description
The primary focus of this round-table will be on the representation of shipwreck in Early Modern Hispanic Literature and Culture. Papers should address how the recurrence of the shipwreck motif in the cultural productions of Spain and Spanish-America between the 16th and 17th centuries is inscribed in a larger nautical collective imaginary that stems from specific social and historical conditions related to maritime expansion, mercantile interests, and warfare. In addition to social-historical circumstances, presenters may explore the topos of shipwreck in relation to classical antiquity tradition to understand how and with what purpose it is reformulated in the 16th and 17th centuries.