H-Diplo Publication Schedule, 18 to 29 October

Diane N. Labrosse's picture

The H-Diplo publication schedule for the period 18 to 29 October is as follows:

Week of 18 October:

1. H-Diplo Roundtable Review of Lea David, The Past Can’t Heal Us: The Dangers of Mandating Memory in the Name of Human Rights.  Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2020.

Introduction by: Robert M. Hayden, University of Pittsburgh

Reviewed by

Yuval Benziman, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem Israel

Siniša Malešević, University College, Dublin

Sara Dybris McQuaid, University of Copenhagen.

Monika Palmberger, Universität Wien

2. H-Diplo Essay Series on Learning the Scholar’s Craft: Reflections of Historians and International Relations Scholars.

From Normandy to Berlin to Buenos Aires to Helsinki

Essay by Stephen G. Rabe, Emeritus, University of Texas at Dallas

3. The H-Diplo/ISSF Policy Series: America and the World: The Effects of the Trump Presidency

Death Grip Handshakes and Flattery Diplomacy: The Macron-Trump Connection and Its Larger Implications for Alliance Politics

Essay by Kathryn C. Statler, University of San Diego

4. H-Diplo Review of Bhubhindar Singh, Reconstructing Japan’s Security Policy: The Role of Military Crises. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2020.

Reviewed by: Kei Koga, Nanyang Technological University

5. H-Diplo Article Review of Pablo León-Aguinaga and Lorenzo Delgado Gómez-Escalonilla, “The Deployment of US Military Assistance to Spain in the 1950s: Limited Modernisation and Strategic Dependence,” Cold War History 21:1 (2021): 55-70.

Reviewed by David A. Messenger, University of South Alabama

6.  H-Diplo/ISSF Review of Special Issue on Nuclear History, Cold War History, 21: 3 (2021): 243-336.

Reviewed by Jacques E. C. Hymans, University of Southern California

7. H-Diplo/ISSF Roundtable Review of Dominic D.P. Johnson, Strategic Instincts: The Adaptive Advantages of Cognitive Biases in International Politics. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2020.

Introduction by Valerie M. Hudson, Texas A&M University

Reviewers:

Joshua D. Kertzer, Harvard University

Marika Landau-Wells, University of California, Berkeley

Janice Stein, University of Toronto

Week of 25 October:

1. H-Diplo Roundtable Review of Michael Brenes, For Might and Right: Cold War Defense Spending and the Remaking of American Democracy. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 2020.

Introduction by Thomas Maddux, Emeritus California State University Northridge

Reviewers:

Brian Casserly, Bellevue College

Chris Foss, Washington State University Vancouver

Amy Rutenberg, Iowa State University

Rosella Cappella Zielinski, Boston University

2.  H-Diplo Essay Series on Learning the Scholar’s Craft: Reflections of Historians and International Relations Scholars.

Vietnam, Watergate, and the Emergence of Holocaust Studies

Essay by Christopher R. Browning, professor emeritus, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

3. H-Diplo Review of Michelle Gordon, Extreme Violence and the ‘British Way’: Colonial Warfare in Perak, Sierra Leone, and Sudan (London: Bloomsbury Publishing, 2020)

Reviewed by Roel Frakking, Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies

4. H-Diplo Article Review of Joe Majerus, “Creation by Destruction: America and the End of the Pacific War in Light of Economic Reconversion and Post-war Reconstruction,” Diplomacy & Statecraft, 32:1 (March 2021): 60-85.

Reviewed by Marc Gallicchio, Villanova University.

5. H-Diplo/ISSF Article Review of Maggie Dwyer and Oisín Tansey, “Explaining Divergent Trends in Coups and Mutinies: The End of the Cold War and the Role of Military Agency.” Security Studies 29:5 (2020): 864-893.

Reviewed by Erica De Bruin, Hamilton College

6. H-Diplo Review of Charlie Laderman, Sharing the Burden: The Armenian Question, Humanitarian Intervention and Anglo-American Visions of Global Order.  New York: Oxford University Press, 2019.

Reviewed by Aroop Mukharji, Tufts University and the Harvard Kennedy School.

Regards,

Diane Labrosse, H-Diplo managing editor