Discussions

New England Regional Fellowship Consortium Research Grants, 2018-2019

New England Regional Fellowship Consortium

Application deadline: February 1, 2018.

The New England Regional Fellowship Consortium (NERFC), a collaboration of twenty-five major cultural agencies, will offer at least twenty awards in 2018-2019. Each grant will provide a stipend of $5,000 for a total of eight or more weeks of research at three or more participating institutions between June 1, 2018, and May 31, 2019. Graduate students, faculty, and independent researchers are welcome to apply.

CFP: Making a Republic Imperial -- January 15 Deadline

CALL FOR PAPERS:
Making a Republic Imperial
Philadelphia, 28-30 March 2019


The McNeil Center for Early American Studies and the Program in Early American Economy and Society at the Library Company of Philadelphia invite proposals for Making a Republic Imperial, a conference on empire, imperialism, and colonialism in the early American republic (1780s-1850s) to be held in Philadelphia on March 28-30, 2019.

2018 Western History Dissertation Workshop

2018 WESTERN HISTORY DISSERTATION WORKSHOP

Proposals from advanced Ph.D. candidates due March 1, 2018.

The 13th annual Western History Dissertation Workshop will be held May 18-20, 2018, at the University of Colorado Boulder, with housing at Boulder’s Colorado Chautauqua National Historic Landmark. This writing workshop offers vigorous dissertation support to advanced western history PhD students in a collegial group of 10-12 leading scholars from participating institutions across the United States, listed below.

Massachusetts Historical Society Fellowships, 2018-2019

Massachusetts Historical Society Research Fellowships

The Massachusetts Historical Society will offer more than forty research fellowships for the academic year 2018-2019. The first deadline, for MHS-NEH fellowships, is January 15. Start your application and mark your calendar with the deadlines below!

Archaeological Site Confidentiality and Public Interpretation

Archaeologists, having seen lots of destruction of sites due to looting, some of a commercial (rather than hobbyist) scale, tend to want to hold all information about archaeological sites (location, contents, etc.) as confidential, actually, as secret.  While this is somewhat understandable, this presents a significant challenge to public education and interpretation on archaeologial topics where often “place” and site content

Pages

Subscribe to H-AmIndian: Discussions