Lectures, Seminars, and Workshops

This page will dynamically gather announcements for Lectures, Seminars, Workshops, Roundtables, Symposia, Summer Programs, and Conference Announcements that have been posted to H-SAWH.  As new networks move into the Commons, the page will expand its criteria to bring related announcements into the collection.

All Content related to Gender, History, or the U.S. South

Gender Issues in the Hispanic Community

    Title: Gender Issues in the Hispanic Community: culture,

       education, politics, and language in the 21st Century

    Location: Minnesota

    Description: This edited volume seeks to highlight some of the

       contemporary debates on Gender issues of the Hispanic community

       of the 21st Century from various fieldsthe social sciences,

       journalism, the humanities, and the artswhose work. Promoting

       gender equality has been pivotal in accelerating the process of

        ...

CFP: Gendering the Carceral State: African American Women, History, and Criminal Justice

   Title: Gendering the Carceral State: African American Women,

      History, and Criminal Justice

   Date: 2014-01-15

   Description: Call for Papers

      Gendering the Carceral State: African American Women, History,

      and Criminal Justice The Journal of African American History

      (JAAH) i ...

   Contact: Cheryl.Hicks@uncc.edu

   Announcement ID: 207807

CFP: Gender Issues in the African Diaspora

   Title: IMMEDIATE CALL FOR PAPERS (book chapters) for a book

      dealing with gender issues in the African Diaspora (especially

      the Caribbean region and its wide geographical Diaspora).

      Cambridge University Press (UK)

   Date: 2014-01-01

   Description: CALL FPR PAPERS (book chapters) in an edited book

      that has been accepted for publication by Cambridge University

      Press (UK). Tentative book title: Fanm se Chatenn, Nonm se

      Fouyapen dou (Women are Chestnuts, Men are Breadfruits). This

LECTURE: "It Was I Who Did It" Women in the American Revolution by Carol Berkin, 10/25 with live streaming

"It Was I Who Did It" Women in the American Revolution

The American Revolution touched the lives of women — Patriot and Loyalist, White, Native American and African American — in dramatic ways.  They traveled with the army, fought as soldiers, worked on the home front, and were active as propagandists during a time of rising political consciousness.  In her 2013 George Rogers Clark Lecture, Carol Berkin of Baruch College will address the varied ways the American Revolution changed — and did not change — the lives of American women.
 

En-Gendering Human Rights

Title: 3rd Annual Student Research Forum on Human Rights:

       (En)Gendering Human Rights

    Location: Virginia

    Date: 2013-12-05

    Description: Call for Proposals from Undergraduate and Graduate

       Student Researchers, 3rd Annual Forum on Human Rights -

       En)Gendering Human Rights The 3rd Annual College of Liberal

       Arts and Human Sciences Research Forum on Human Rights,

       (En)Gendering Human Rights, will take place on the campus of

       Virginia Tech lo ...

Women in the Era of the American Revolution

    Title: CFP: Women in the Era of the American Revolution

    Location: Virginia

    Date: 2013-12-01

    Description: Call for Papers The Fifth Sons of the American

       Revolution Annual Conference on the American Revolution Women

       in the Era of the American Revolution Colonial Williamsburg

       Williamsburg, Virginia June 20-22, 2014 The Sons of the

       American Revolution and Colonial Williamsburg, with support

       from the Omohun ...

Journal of Women’s History Graduate Student Article Prize

The Editorial Board of the Journal of Women’s History is proud to announce the second biennial prize for the best article manuscript in the field of women’s history authored by a graduate student. Article manuscripts in any chronological and geographical area are welcome. Manuscripts should not exceed 10,000 words, including endnotes, and should follow the University of Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition. Please also submit an abstract of no more than 150 words that summarizes the argument and significance of the work.

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