Call for Papers: AskHistorians 2021 Digital Conference

Lisa Baer-Tsarfati's picture

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Type: 
Conference
Date: 
June 1, 2021
Subject Fields: 
Colonial and Post-Colonial History / Studies, History Education, Race / Ethnic Studies, Research and Methodology, Women's & Gender History / Studies

 

CALL FOR PAPERS
2021 ASKHISTORIANS DIGITAL CONFERENCE
“[DELETED] & MISSING HISTORY: RECONSTRUCTING THE PAST, CONFRONTING DISTORTIONS”
19–21 October 2021

AskHistorians Public History Forum 

Whether it's swords and sandals, corsets and wigs, or statues still standing, the past and its possible meanings resonate with twenty-first century audiences. Historical television series, public history projects, and books of popular history might claim to depict the past "as it really was," but nevertheless illuminate the ways in which we as a society continue to bring the past into dialogue with contemporary popular culture. In so doing, these narratives often reveal more about what we think about the past—and ourselves—than about the past itself. Today, shifting interpretations of the past reveal a growing interest in the inclusion of marginalized voices as well as in questions about the human condition, the relationship between race and national identity, and issues relating to the construction of sexuality, gender, and equality. Indeed, representations of the historical past have been used as lenses through which contemporary society has grappled with very modern examples of brutality, oppression, and the general uncertainty of life.

We therefore welcome proposals from individuals whose research explores representations of the past in any form. As the scope and influence of our topic is broad and far-reaching, we encourage proposals from a wide range of scholarly disciplines on the themes of gender, identity (both personal and national), propaganda, culture, society, accuracy, and authenticity (among others) as these pertain to the ways in which historical narratives have been constructed, represented, or misrepresented. 

As part of our efforts to increase accessibility to scholarship and to foster an environment that supports vibrant interdisciplinary discussion, we will give due consideration to all proposals submitted, whether from faculty, graduate students, independent scholars, and senior undergraduate students from a variety of research backgrounds including, but not limited to: history, art history, literature, film studies, folklore, sociology, anthropology, museum studies, and political science. 

We are especially interested in receiving abstracts from underrepresented groups in academia, and we therefore invite abstracts from people who identify as minoritized in any way, particularly those who may identify as BIPOC/BAME, women, LGBTQIA+, neurodiverse, and/or differently abled. 

AREAS OF INTEREST INCLUDE, BUT ARE NOT LIMITED TO:

  • Challenges to the current understanding of an historical event by restoring the perspectives or participation of marginalized individuals. This includes, for example, women’s histories, BIPOC/BAME perspectives, LGBTQIA+ histories and queer studies, disability and neurodiverse perspectives, the perspectives of the Global South, decolonial and subaltern studies, and the perspectives of religious minorities.
  • Depictions of minoritized groups or status in modern-day book, film, or other pop-culture work.
  • Examinations of the commemoration of an historical event or person.
  • Mobilization of the past to serve political agendas
  • Questions of authenticity versus accuracy (what “feels” historically accurate versus what is)
  • The role of museums and historical reenactments in changing the historical narrative

SOURCES OF INTEREST INCLUDE, BUT ARE NOT LIMITED TO:

  • Art and Literature: art, books, poetry, and/or theatre
  • Civic Life: statues, holidays, historic sites, and/or museums
  • Education: history curricula, museum exhibits, podcasts, and/or public lectures
  • Film Studies: cinema, television, and/or web-based video
  • Folklore: folklore, urban legends, folk songs, and/or the folkloresque 
  • Gaming Culture: historical reenactment, role-playing games, and/or video games
  • Internet Culture: memes, trending topics, and/or clickbait
  • Journalism: newspaper and magazine articles, news websites, and/or television news shows
  • Product and Other Promotion: Advertising, propaganda, and/or PR

Applicants are asked to please submit an abstract of no more than 300 words and a short biography of no more than 100 words to conference@askhistorians.com by 11:59 PM EDT on 1 June 2021.

Contact Info: 

Lisa Baer-Tsarfati
Conference Organizing Chair