Votes for Women Trail for Kentucky

The entries below can be searched by selected fields - they are all part of the annotated map of Kentucky's “Votes for Women Trail” (see the map on another page here). To search for a particular set of the Trail entries, enter a search term in one or more of the fields below - then click "Apply" to see a new listing in alpha order.

You can help us identify Kentucky’s suffrage sites and connect with a nation-wide suffrage history digital map being developed by National Collaboration for Women's Historical Sites in collaboration with the National Woman's Party 2020 Women's Vote Centennial Initiative (led by the Sewall-Belmont House & Museum and the League of Women Voters). Please log in to H-Kentucky and contribute to the Kentucky Votes for Women Trail with your own entry today.


Associated Organization: n/a - the Neighborhood House moved to its current location, 201 N. 25th Street, in the 1940s
County: Jefferson
Name of Historic Site: Neighborhood House
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: In 1913 Beach spent the winter as a resident of Neighborhood House, joining other educated activists providing services to a poor neighborhood and researching social problems; she moved there permanently in 1914.
Years of Importance:1912-1920

Established in September 1896 at Preston and Jefferson Streets in Louisville, Neighborhood House was one of the first settlement houses in Kentucky. In 1901 they moved to 428 South First Street to a house donated by Mrs. W.B. Belknap and became incorporated in 1902. It expanded into a community center and playground serving children and immigrant families from the surrounding low-income neighborhoods. Some of the social service workers lived in the building.

According to Dr. Ann Allen's biosketch, Cornelia Alexander Beach spent the winter of 1913 as a resident of Neighborhood House, and then moved there permanently in 1914 to live - she also took a teaching position in Louisville. Beach joined the National Woman's Party and travelled to Washington DC in August 1917 to join the protesters in front of the White House. She, along with Lucy Burns and eight other protesters, was arrested at the east gate of the White House on August 28th. She was released on a $100 bond.

In 1925 a large factory building nearby was bought to be used as a boy's club building, named the Lucy Belknap Memorial Building. None of the buildings or playground associated with this period of the Neighborhood House history can be seen today.


Associated Organization: n/a
County: Fayette
Name of Historic Site: Phoenix Hotel (no longer standing)
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: 28th annual Kentucky Equal Rights Association convention was held at the Phoenix Hotel in Lexington, Nov 30-Dec 1, 1917
Years of Importance:1912-1920

The 28th annual Kentucky Equal Rights Association convention was held at the Phoenix Hotel in Lexington November 30 through December 1, 1917.

Tea on Friday was hosted by the Fayette County Equal Rights Association at the Y.M.C.A.; and that night there was a joint meeting with the Eastern Kentucky Educational Association featuring Mrs. Nellie McClung of Canada as the suffrage speaker, introduced by Madeline McDowell Breckinridge. On Saturday after committe work, a luncheon featured Mrs. McClung, as well as the Hon. Jeanette Rankin and Mrs. Breckinridge as speakers. The Central Kentucky Woman’s Club joined with KERA to for their program on Saturday afternoon.

A total of 66 delegates and members of the Board were present – President Christine Bradley South’s report indicated four new clubs formed, Laura Clay and Mrs. Harry Whiteside went to New York and aided in the campaigning there. Letters have been sent from State HQ to every member of the legislature of 1918 as well as personal interviews. “Sentiment is vastly changed and it seems now that this session will look kindly upon suffrage legislation (11).”

Officers for the year are: Christine Bradley South of Frankfort (President), Jessie Leigh Hutchinson of Lexington (First Vice President), Laura Clay of Lexington (Second Vice President), Caroline Leech of Louisville (Third Vice President), Elise Bennett Smith of Richmond (Corresponding Secretary), Virginia Robb McDowell of Louisville (Recording Secretary), Rebecca R. Judah (Treasurer), Mrs. Joseph Alderson of Middlesboro (Auditor), Josephine Post of Paducah (Member of NAWSA Executive Committee), and Julia D. Henning of Louisville (Chairman of Congressional Work). Plans to work for a federal amendment and state amendment granting suffrage are both presented, and the organization ultimately focuses on the federal. At this convention there is also a focus on patriotic work for the "war to end all wars."

Local reports were received from: Clark County, Crittenden County, Fayette County, Franklin County, Fulton County, Grayson County, Hardin County, Irvington, Kenton County, LaRue County, Madison County, Mason County, Middlesboro, Pulaski County, Scott County and Shelby County. In the Fayette ERA report was an interesting strategy combining patriotic work with suffrage campaigning - they printed pencils to be donated the to Red Cross and Y.W.C.A. to be put in the comfort bags for the Army and Navy:

"For the long, long day,
For the taxes we pay,
We want something to say,
VOTES FOR WOMEN."


Associated Organization: n/a
County: Fayette
Name of Historic Site: Phoenix Hotel (no longer standing)
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Kentucky Equal Rights Association statewide convention site, 1915
Years of Importance:1912-1920

In November 8-10, 1915, the Phoenix Hotel was the meeting site for the Kentucky Equal Rights Association. After an automobile parade down Lexington's Main Street on the afternoon of November 8th, the suffragists gathered for an afternoon reception, called a "Boston Tea Party" hosted by KERA President Madeline McDowell Breckinridge at Ashland (Henry Clay estate). That evening at the Old Opera House on North Broadway, the Lexington Mayor J.E. Cassidy welcomed the group and they listened to a lecture by Ethel Snowden, of London, England. A pacifist and socialist, the Viscountess Ethel Snowden was a speaker for the National Union of Women’s Suffrage Societies in England and was on a world-wide lecture tour when she and her husband, Philip, came to Lexington. She was opposed to the use of violence in any form, including the tactics undertaken by the British suffragettes under the leadership of Mrs. Pankhurst. She had been in Kentucky several times before, at the Louisville Chatauqua in 1907, at the Louisville Woman’s Outdoor Art League in 1908, again in Louisville in 1913. She had been commissioned by the Fayette County Equal Rights Association to give a speaking tour of 10 lectures around Kentucky organized by Mrs. E.L. Hutchinson of Lexington: Covington Nov. 5th, Richmond Nov 6th, Lexington at the convention on the 8th, Frankfort Nov 12, Louisville Nov 14, Owensboro Nov 18th and Paducah on the 19th. Her book The Feminist Movement (London, 1913) includes chapters on making the case for woman suffrage.

On November 9th, the meeting opened in the Ball Room of the Phoenix Hotel. The convention offered several other items of interest to the whole community, including a presentation by Madame Rosika Schwimmer of Hungary on the international peace movement. Schwimmer had been working since 1913 as an international press secretary of the International Woman Suffrage Alliance, and she was living in London when the war broke out. She came to the U.S. to find champions in the woman suffrage movement for a neutral mediation of what came to be known as the Great War. She lectured on woman suffrage to support herself, but it was her stories about the horrors of war and her appeals for peace that got her the paying audiences she needed.

The format of the organization changed slightly for this year, with the addition of special committees such as news correspondent or state and county fairs, and the creation of an advisory board made up of men and women from across Kentucky. Walter J. Millard of Cincinnati spoke on Wednesday evening in a program entitled “For Men Especially” with the topic of his lecture: “Chivalry Up-to-Date.” According to the KERA minutes, he defined chivalry as “a generous act without expected compensation,” and that the granting of woman suffrage would bring chivalry “up-to-date.” As in the previous two years, a large number of local reports were received, this year from: Louisville, Shelby County, Franklin County, Meade County, Hardin County, Crittenden County, Bell County, Carlisle County, Boyd County, Clark County, Daviess County, Madison County, Hopkins County, Mercer County, Warren County, McCracken County, Hancock County, Woodford County and Fleming County.

Standing at the corner of East Main and Limestone Street (formerly the Maysville Road), this version of the Phoenix Hotel had been constructed in 1897 on top of three other taverns that had been placed there since the early 1800s. The building was demolished by Governor Wallace Wilkinson in 1981 to make way for what he proposed to be the World Coal Center - but this proposed corporate headquarters of major coal companies did not ever get built. In its stead is Phoenix Park, a popular space for public demonstrations and often a refuge for those who wander the streets of Lexington.


Associated Organization: Kentucky Office of Historic Properties of the Finance and Administration Cabinet
County: Franklin
Name of Historic Site: Kentucky Capitol Building
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: In 1920 Kentucky ratified the Susan B. Anthony Amendment and also passed a statewide law granting presidential suffrage to women
Years of Importance:1920-present

On January 6, 1920, Kentucky became the 23rd state to ratify the Nineteenth Amendment, which stated: "The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex." This took place in the new Kentucky Capitol building that had opened in 1910, and was the result of many years of lobbying by Kentucky activists determined to win their right to vote.

Then on March 29th, and with the leadership of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association (KERA) standing around him (seen here in an iconic photograph - names of the women still need to be identified), Governor Edwin P. Morrow signed a bill giving women in Kentucky Presidential suffrage. Despite the fact that Kentucky ratified the Nineteenth Amendment in January, the fate of the amendment is still in question, since one state was still needed to ratify it. This state law guaranteed that Kentucky women would be able to vote in the November 1920 Presidential election, regardless of the status of the federal amendment. Even though KERA (and Governor Morrow) opposed a state constitutional amendment - a goal that Laura Clay, with funding from her sister Sallie Clay Bennett, continued to lobby for - the General Assembly moved forward with a statewide suffrage bill.

 


Associated Organization: Kentucky Historical Society
County: Franklin
Name of Historic Site: Old State Capitol
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: First statewide suffrage law passed in February1838 for implementation with the new Common School law
Years of Importance:1792-1879

On February 16, 1838, Kentucky passed the first statewide woman suffrage law (since New Jersey revoked women's right to vote in 1807) – allowing female heads of household to vote in elections deciding on taxes and local boards for the new county “common school” system. The law exempted the cities of Louisville, Lexington and Maysville since they had already adopted a system of public schools. The legislature at this time was meeting in the Old State Capitol - which was relatively new then since construction finished in 1830.

"Sec. 37. Be it further enacted, That any widow or feme sole, over twenty-one years of age, residing and owning property subject to taxation for school purposes, according to the provisions of this act, in any school district, shall have the right to vote in person or by written proxy; and any infant residing and owning property, subject for taxation for school purposes, according to the provisions of this act, in any school district, shall have the right to vote by his or her guardian (Sec. 37, page 282)."

NOTE: in Sec 36 above this part of the law, the poll tax to support the new public school system is expressed as levied on "every white male inhabitant, over twenty-one years of age in each district..." however, the suffrage section of this act is not expressly limited to white females.

 


Associated Organization: Lexington Cemetery
County: Fayette
Name of Historic Site: Lexington Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Frances E. Beauchamp
Years of Importance:1920-present
, Years of Importance:1880-1894
, Years of Importance:1894-1912

Madison County native Frances E. Beauchamp (1857-1923) was a leader in social reform and a popular lecturer on temperance. In 1886 she joined the Woman's Christian Temperance Union, and in the fall of that year was made corresponding secretary for Kentucky. The following year she was appointed superintendent of juvenile work for Kentucky. In 1894 she was made one of the recording secretaries of the National Woman's Christian Temperance Union, and in 1895 was elected president of the Kentucky Woman's Christian Temperance Union which she led until her death in 1923. She chaired Kentucky's Prohibition party for ten years, and her work at the national level assured ratification of the 18th Amendment. She was a close friend to the woman suffrage movement and help to smooth over any issues that were raised by other prohibitionist leaders against the suffrage activists. She is buried in Section I-1, Lot 67 (see Cemetery Map online here).


Associated Organization: BBB of Louisville, Southern Indiana, & Western Kentucky
County: Jefferson
Name of Historic Site: Mrs. Augustus Schacher Home
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Denied a table at the Kentucky Educational Association meeting in 1913, KERA set up an exhibit in a nearby front yard.
Years of Importance:1912-1920

At this location suffragists used the Schacher front yard to promote the suffrage cause at during the Kentucky Educational Association meeting.


Associated Organization: The Seelbach Hilton Louisville
County: Jefferson
Name of Historic Site: Seelbach Hotel
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Site of KERA conventions in 1911 and 1919, also site for the National American Woman Suffrage Association convention in 1911.
Years of Importance:1894-1912
, Years of Importance:1912-1920

The Seelbach was the site of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association conventions of 1911 (see minutes online in Kentuckiana Digital Library) and 1919, as well as the site of the annual meeting of the National American Woman Suffrage Association in October 1911 (see "Proceedings..." online in Hathitrust.org).


Associated Organization: Heyburn Building LLC
County: Jefferson
Name of Historic Site: Susan Look Avery Home (no longer extant)
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Home of Susan Look Avery, an active member of the Louisville Woman's Club and Kentucky Equal Rights Association.
Years of Importance:1880-1894

Susan Look Avery (October 27, 1817 – February 1, 1915) was a key leader in both the women's club and suffrage movements, as a co-founder of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association, the Louisville Equal Rights Association (later the Louisville Suffrage Association), and the Louisville Woman's Club. She invited American Woman Suffrage Association leaders Henry Blackwell and Lucy Stone to her home when they came to Louisville for the 1881 American Woman Suffrage Association's national meeting (the first national suffrage convention held South of the Ohio River).


Associated Organization: Private residence
County: Woodford
Name of Historic Site: Home of Josephine Henry 1875-1900
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Where Mrs. Henry drafted many of her suffrage-related essays and speeches
Years of Importance:1792-1879
, Years of Importance:1880-1894
, Years of Importance:1894-1912

Josephine Williamson married in 1868 Capt. William Henry, a former Confederate soldier and principal of a school for boys in Versailles. She and Laura Clay founded the Kentucky Equal Rights Association in 1888, and became a featured speaker for the KERA across the state. She was the Prohibition Party candidate for clerk of the Kentucky Court of Appeals in 1890 and 1894, and thus became the first woman in the South to run a public campaign for a state office. In the 1890s, she worked with KERA to lobby the legislature for various reforms - the most important for her was the passage of the 1894 Woman's Property Act. She was the first woman to run for statewide office in Kentucky and is credited with passage of the 1894 Kentucky Married Woman’s Property Act. On November 14, 1897, Mrs. Henry was nominated as the Prohibition Party candidate for president. The Henrys bought the lot for 224 Montgomery Avenue in 1875 and sold it in 1900 to Victoria Gray and Irvin Railey. The Railey's built the house that now stands there. 


Associated Organization: Lexington Cemetery
County: Fayette
Name of Historic Site: Lexington Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Mary Barr Clay, Section J, Lot 6
Years of Importance:1920-present
, Years of Importance:1880-1894
, Years of Importance:1894-1912

Mary Barr Clay (1839-1924) was one of the first leaders of the suffrage movement in Kentucky, joining the movement in the 1870s and founding the Kentucky Equal Rights Association. She remained involved in the push for suffrage with her leadership roles in the national suffrage organizations (AWSA and NWSA, then the NAWSA) until the early twentieth century. Clay's grave is in Section J, Lot 6 (see cemetery driving map online).


Associated Organization: Private residence
County: Fayette
Name of Historic Site: Private residence of Desha and Madeline McDowell Breckinridge (no longer extant)
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: As President of KERA, she had many visiting speakers stay with her here while in Lexington.
Years of Importance:1894-1912
, Years of Importance:1912-1920
, Years of Importance:1920-present

This was the site that once held the private residence of Desha Breckinridge (editor of the Lexington Herald) and his wife Madge.

 
On November 23, 1920, a servant found Madge unconscious where she had fallen in her home - a blood clot in an artery in the brain was diagnosed. Se died at home on Thanksgiving Day, November 25th, at the age of forty-eight. Her funeral was held at Ashland and she was buried in the Lexington Cemetery.
 

Associated Organization: N/A
County: Fayette
Name of Historic Site: Phoenix Hotel (no longer standing)
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: 1915 annual meeting of the Fayette County Equal Rights Association
Years of Importance:1912-1920

On September 13-15, 1915 the Fayette County Equal Rights Association held their annual meeting in the Phoenix Hotel.

Elected officers:

  • President, Mrs. E.L. Hutchinson, 631 East Main Street
  • First Vice President, Mrs. F.O. Young, 257 South Limestone
  • Second Vice President, Mrs. W.D. Frake, 140 Barr Street
  • Third Vice President, Mrs. W.F. Clore, 265 South Ashland Avenue
  • Treasurer, Mrs. Curry Tunis, 442 Fayette Park
  • Secretary, Miss Margaret Preston, Hampton Court

They organized suffrage talks to be made in Woodford County district schools, Lexington universities and schools. Reports indicated that the speakers heard that year were Sue Helen Ring Robinson, Mrs. Desha (Madeline McDowell) Breckinridge, Mrs. E.L. (Jessie) Hutchinson, Mrs. Clarence Le Bus, Mr. Walter Millard, and Mrs. Harrison Gardner [Elizabeth Dunster Gibson] Foster.

The following delegates were appointed to go to Atlantic City for the NAWSA convention on October 21: Laura Clay, Ida W. Harrison, Mrs. E.S. Scott, and Mrs. Elizabeth Searles Spanton.


County: Fayette
Name of Historic Site: Ben Ali Theatre (no longer standing)
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: In April 1915 the Fayette County Equal Rights Association hosted the English suffrage leader Mrs. Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence, a prominent member of the Women’s International League for Peace and publisher of "Votes for Women"
Years of Importance:1912-1920

In April 1915 the Fayette County Equal Rights Association hosted at the Ben Ali Theatre the English suffrage leader Mrs. Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence, a prominent member of the Women’s International League for Peace and publisher of "Votes for Women" in England. She was on a speaking tour in the U.S. on behalf of the United Suffragists and was dedicated to connecting woman suffrage to the international peace movement. She and her husband were arrested in 1912 for conspiracy after a public demonstration led by the Women's Social and Political Union (WSPU) that involved breaking windows. After their release from prison, the Pethick-Lawrences publicly broke with Emmeline Pankhurst and her daughter Christabel because of their disagreement over the more radical forms of activism. She and Lexington-native Sophonisba Breckinridge attended the Women's Peace Congress at the Hague soon after leaving Lexington.


Associated Organization: N/A
County: Fayette
Name of Historic Site: Ben Ali Theatre (no longer standing)
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Fayette County Equal Rights Association invited the economist and author Mrs. Charlotte Gilman Perkins to speak in Lexington on November 3, 1913
Years of Importance:1912-1920

The Fayette County Equal Rights Association invited the economist and author Mrs. Charlotte Perkins Gilman to speak in Lexington November 3, 1913. Mrs. Gilman was best known for her 1898 book, Women and Economics: A Study of the Economic Relation Between Men and Women as a Factor in Social Evolution. She also wrote a popular book of suffrage songs and poems that was published in 1911. She had recently returned from the seventh conference of the International Woman Suffrage Alliance which had met that year in Budapest, Hungary. The Ben Ali Theatre, built by horseman James Ben Ali Haggin to seat 1500 patrons, had opened in September of that same year across from the popular Phoenix Hotel. The building was originally designed for theatre and vaudeville acts, and included a balcony where blacks were to seated. By 1915 it had became primarily a movie house. In 1965, after protests led by the local CORE chapter and the passing of Kentucky’s Civil Rights bill, the theatre was closed and torn down to be replaced by a parking garage - and now is the site of the Fayette County Courthouse plaza.


Associated Organization: Henry Clay Memorial Foundation
County: Fayette
Name of Historic Site: Ashland, The Henry Clay Estate
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Childhood home of Madeline McDowell Breckinridge. Historic marker #1876 stands on the property to commemorate Breckinridge's work for reform.
Years of Importance:1791-1879, 1880-1894
Breckinridge was an active social reformer throughout her adult life, and woman suffrage was one of many causes she would champion. She served as President of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association from 1912-1915 and 1919-1920.

Associated Organization: Lexington Fayette Urban County Government
County: Fayette
Name of Historic Site: Cheapside Park, next to the old Fayette County Court House
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Fayette County Equal Rights Association's Suffrage Parade, 6 May 1916
Years of Importance:1912-1920

Site of speech concluding a Suffrage Parade on the morning of May 6, 1916, in Lexington, Kentucky. The nearly 1000 marchers of men, women and children had started at Gratz Park, marched from Third Street to Broadway, south on Broadway to Main Street to the Union Station and back west again to Cheapside. There, the crowds heard a speech by suffrage orator Walter J. Millard. See more about the parade on the KWSP blog, and a transcript of the Lexington Herald newspaper article covering the event is available also. Below is a postcard, courtesy of the Kentucky Historical Society, showing a busy County Court Day in Lexington's Cheapside sometime in the early 20th century.


Associated Organization: Currently a multi-owned private residence, condominiums
County: Fayette
Name of Historic Site: The Arts Club
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Site for Kentucky Equal Rights Association statewide meeting, October 24-25, 1912
Years of Importance:1912-1920

 The twenty-third annual convention of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association is held in the Arts Club Building in Lexington. At this meeting Madeline McDowell Breckinridge is elected president - a position that had been held by Laura Clay since the organization's founding in 1888. The special guest keynote speaker that year was Mrs. Ella S. Stewart of Chicago. The Arts Club Building still stands at 441 West Second Street in Lexington (seen here on a 3D view of a Bing map). A postcard from the early 20th century shows its stately entrance (see the image online in the Ronald Morgan Postcard Collection at the Kentucky Historical Society). You can read the Convention's report online via the Kentucky Digital Library, courtesy of the University of Kentucky Special Collections and Research Center.


Associated Organization: University of Kentucky
County: Fayette
Name of Historic Site: Main Building, Kentucky State College (now University of Kentucky)
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: The former presidential nominee for the Equal Rights Party gave a lecture on "The Woman of To-Day"
Years of Importance:1880-1894

On February 20, 1885, the Union Literary Society of State College (now the University of Kentucky) hosted a lecture by Mrs. Belva Ann Lockwood. (You can see a photo of the all-male members of the Union Literary Society around that time here in the Kentucky Digital Library). Women had not been allowed to attend the college until 1880, and then only in the "Normal Department" for teacher education - women were not allowed to earn degrees at State College until 1888. So, it was during this transition time for co-education that the administration allow for the group to recruit Mrs. Lockwood to speak on campus at 8 p.m. on a Friday evening. A leader in woman’s rights and suffrage as well as the National Equal Rights Party’s presidential nominee in 1884 and 1888, Lockwood titled her address “The Woman of Today.”  The event was well-advertised and supported by the recently created Fayette County Equal Rights Association.  The lecture was viewed by local newspapers as a “major cultural and intellectual event.”  Held in the campus chapel within the Main Building (later known as the Administration Building) the event was packed with students and Lexington’s prominent citizens. See coverage in the Lexington Daily Press, February 17-21, 1885.


Associated Organization: University of Kentucky
County: Fayette
Name of Historic Site: Patterson Hall, Women's Dormitory
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Equal Rights Association formed by 24 university women under the direction of Mrs. Louise Becker of Louisville
Years of Importance:1912-1920

 After many years of lobbying by the Kentucky Equal Rights Association, women at the State University in Lexington finally got access to campus housing in 1904. Patterson Hall was built for this purpose and was the first of the University's buildings to be constructed off of the main campus existing at that time. Kate Meriwether Barker (wife of the university's president at the time) served as the Dean of Women and lived in the dormitory when the Philosophian Literary Society organized an Equal Rights Association in March 1915 (see the KWSP Timeline entry on this). Mrs. Louis Becker came from the Louisville Woman Suffrage Association to support the students in their creation of the group. Marie Louise Michot of Louisville (see her yearbook photo) was elected president of the UK ERA; Julia Van Arsdale, vice-president; and, Jacqueline Hall, secretary.


Associated Organization: Kentucky Equal Rights Association
County: Pulaski
Name of Historic Site: Fountain Square, Somerset
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Glenn gave a speech here during her 1914 suffrage tour across Kentucky. She was sent from NAWSA to help organize new suffrage organizations in the state
Years of Importance:1912-1920

Miss Lily Ray Glenn from the National American Woman Suffrage Association gave her report to the Kentucky Equal Rights Association in 1914 about her recruiting work in Kentucky of that year, ranging from March 5 to November 11, 1914. She was directed in her Kentucky by Madeline McDowell Breckinridge to cover 45 counties in speaking on suffrage and forming suffrage clubs. She organized 27 county organizations in total. Here is her report about her work in Somerset: "In somerset, a town of about 5,000, I spoke at the Fountain Square. I reached Somerset at 3 in the afternoon and at once asked permission to use the courthouse that night (Saturday). They were not willing to give it to me, so I put up some handbills in the store windows (these were so worded as to fit any occasion, and I always carried them), announcing that I would speak at the Fountain Square, getting the permission of the Mayor and the Chief of Police I spoke from an auto, and the policeman on duty signed a card and helped distribute the literature. Mr. Flippin, Representative was in the crowd and shook hands with me afterwards, saying that he wanted me to know that he would work for woman suffrage and vote for it every time. It was a successful street meeting."


Associated Organization: Private residence
County: Jefferson
Name of Historic Site: Private residence of J. Spurgeon and J. Wesley Walling
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: This home is where Mrs. Walling, a famous orator and political activist, lived out the latter part of her life "in quiet seclusion"
Years of Importance:1920-present
, Years of Importance:1792-1879

 Famous as a great patriot and orator during and after the Civil War, Mrs. Walling gave speeches on equal rights and universal suffrage while being billed as "The Banished Heroine of the South" --when introduced by Horace Greeley to a large audience in Cooper Institute, he declared her "the greatest female speaker of the age." She spoke in large cities in the North, and on 10th May 1866, the U.S. Senate passed a resolution to have her speak from the Senate floor - never done by a woman before and not to be seen again until later in the twentieth century. She came to live in Louisville later in life to be with her sons, and after living in relative seclusion, died at home at 86 years of age.


Associated Organization: Western Kentucky University
County: Warren
Name of Historic Site: Van Meter Hall, administration building while Cherry was president
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Annual contest awarding $10 prize for best equal rights essay written by a student at a Kentucky college or university
Years of Importance:1912-1920

With the urging of Lida Calvert Obenchain (wife of a mathematics professor at the predecessor to Western Kentucky University and a member of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association), President Henry Hardin Cherry of the Western Kentucky State Normal School took a stand to support the cause of Kentucky woman suffrage. In 1913 he agreed to participate in an annual contest that would award $10 for the best equal rights essay written by a student; and, later that summer he was one of several prominent local leaders who signed a petition to Congress. He also invited Madeline McDowell Breckinridge (then president of the KERA) to speak on suffrage at Western.

 


Associated Organization: Kentucky Equal Rights Association
County: Fayette
Name of Historic Site: Merrick Lodge Building
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Site for Kentucky Equal Rights Association statewide meetings
Years of Importance:1912-1920

Two statewide conventions of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association were held here at the Merrick Lodge Building in Lexington: the seventh Convention (October 24-26, 1894) and the eleventh Convention (December 11-12, 1899). This large meeting space, one block north of Main Street on the corner of West Short and North Limestone (old Maysville Road), was built by architect Henry A. Tandy who owned the African-American business, The Tandy and Byrd Construction Company, which had also built several notable structures including the old Fayette County Courthouse.


Associated Organization: Christian County Suffrage League
County: Christian
Name of Historic Site: The Avalon assembly hall (no longer standing)
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Christian County Suffrage League is launched on April 16, 1914
Years of Importance:1912-1920

The Christian County Suffrage League was formed at a public meeting in Hopkinsville on April 16, 1914. The "large crowd" at the new assembly hall opened only a year before, The Avalon, was addressed by Judge W.P. Winfree, Miss Lily Ray Glenn of NAWSA and KERA, and Judge William T. Fowler. On Friday, the members of the new league met again in the Avalon and elected Mrs. William T. (Ila Earle) Fowler, president, Mrs. A.R. Kasey, vice-president, Miss Martha Kelly, secretary, and Mrs. Ed C. Gray, treasurer (Meacham, 367). Mrs. Fowler submitted their report to the Kentucky Equal Rights Association in 1914 about their founding. The club organized a talk by Mrs. Mitchell during the teachers' institute that summer, and Mrs. Breckinridge spoke in June; they had 70 members by that fall. Miss Lily Ray Glenn from the National American Woman Suffrage Association gave her report to the KERA that same year about her recruiting work in Kentucky of that year, ranging from March 5 to November 11, 1914. She was directed in her Kentucky by Madeline McDowell Breckinridge to cover 45 counties in speaking on suffrage and forming suffrage clubs. She organized 27 county organizations in total that year.


Associated Organization: A commercial bank today
County: Fayette
Name of Historic Site: Office of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association, 726 McClelland Building
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Office for Mrs. Breckinridge, both for KERA and for her work with the National Association for the Study and Prevention of Tuberculosis
Years of Importance:1912-1920

The office of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association was at 726 McClelland Building, one of the first two tall buildings in Lexington. See for example the essay contest notice in a University student newspaper The Idea (January 21, 1915) sponsored by the KERA.  Madeline McDowell Breckinridge served as president from 1912 to 1915; she also served as second vice-president of the NAWSA between 1913 and 1915. The daughter of Mary Barr Clay, Mrs. Elizabeth Bennett (wife of T. Jefferson) Smith, took on the presidency in 1915 for only one year before going to work for the NAWSA. Christine Bradley South of Frankfort finished out Smith's term, and then Breckinridge was elected president again in 1919.


Associated Organization: Carroll County Government
County: Carroll
Name of Historic Site: Carroll County Courthouse
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Glenn gave a speech here during her 1914 suffrage tour across Kentucky. She was sent from NAWSA to help organize new suffrage organizations in the state
Years of Importance:1912-1920

Associated Organization: Shelby County Sheriff's Office
County: Shelby
Name of Historic Site: Shelby County Court House
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Ethel Snowden, a British suffragist, spoke at the Shelby County Court House on November 7, 1915.
Years of Importance:1912-1920
Snowden was a well known British supporter of suffrage who toured and spoke in America extensively.

Associated Organization: Battle Grove Cemetery
County: Harrison
Name of Historic Site: Battle Grove Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Mary Barlow Trimble
Years of Importance:1912-1920, 1920-Present
Trimble was a resident of Covington and an active supporter of woman suffrage who helped to found the Covington Equal Rights Club.

Associated Organization: Lindsey Wilson College
County: Adair
Name of Historic Site: Lindsey Wilson Chapel
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Firth gave a speech here in August of 1914, during an organizing tour of the state.
Years of Importance:1894-1912
Jessie Firth was a suffragist from Covington who went on an organizing tour of Kentucky in 1914 for the Kentucky Equal Rights Association. She was a member of this organization and would serve as one of it's Vice-Presidents. She is also known as Mrs. Charles Firth.

Associated Organization: Richmond Cemetery
County: Madison
Name of Historic Site: Richmond Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Elise Bennett Smith
Years of Importance:1920-Present
Elise Bennett Smith was the President of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association from 1915-1916, she also served as the NAWSA Executive Committee member on multiple occasions. She is also known as Mrs. Thomas Jefferson Smith and Elise Bennett Smith Gagliardini.

County: Fayette
Name of Historic Site: Ida Withers Harrison Home
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Home of Ida Withers Harrison
Harrison was a supporter of woman suffrage, especially school suffrage. When school suffrage for women was made legal in second-class cities in 1894, Harrison was one of the candidates for school board in Lexington.

Associated Organization: Nicholas County Government
County: Nicholas
Name of Historic Site: Nicholas County Courthouse
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Henry gave a speech at the Nicholas County Courthouse in Carlisle, KY in 1892.
Years of Importance:1880-1894

County: Bell
Name of Historic Site: Middlesboro Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Stella Thomson Helburn
Years of Importance:1920-Present
Helburn (1873-1955) was the secretary of the Bell County Equal Rights Association, a local of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association in 1915.

Associated Organization: Dollar Store
County: Kenton
Name of Historic Site: Home of Trimble Family
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Site of home of Mary Barlow Trimble and Kate Trimble Woolsey
Years of Importance:1792-1879, 1880-1894, 1894-1912
This is the site where the former Trimble family home stood. The original building has been destroyed. Both Mary Barlow Trimble and her daughter Kate Trimble Woolsey were suffragists and lived in this home.

Associated Organization: Ashland Cemetery
County: Boyd
Name of Historic Site: Ashland Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Celia M. Freeman
Years of Importance:1920-Present
Celia M. Freeman (1881-1959) was the President of the Ashland Equal Rights Association in 1913. Her address is listed in the convention minutes as 34th and Winchester Avenue. She is also known as Mrs. C.M. Freeman.

Associated Organization: Lawrenceburg Cemetery
County: Anderson
Name of Historic Site: Lawrenceburg Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Louise Parlin Lillard
Years of Importance:1920-Present
Louise Parlin Lillard was the auditor of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association in 1915. She is also known as Mrs. W.F. Lillard.

Associated Organization: Madison County Government
County: Madison
Name of Historic Site: Madison County Courthouse
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: The annual convention of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association was held at the courthouse in Richmond many times, including the years 1890, 1892, 1895, 1898, 1907, and 1908.
Years of Importance:1880-1894, 1894-1912

Associated Organization: Jessamine County Government
County: Jessamine
Name of Historic Site: Jessamine County Courthouse
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Henry gave a speech at the Jessamine County Courthouse in Nicholasville, KY in 1892.
Years of Importance:1880-1894
Henry addressed a meeting of the Woodford and Jessamine Teachers Institute with this speech.

Associated Organization: Winchester Cemetery Co.
County: Clark
Name of Historic Site: Winchester Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Marie Warren Beckner
Years of Importance:1920-Present
Beckner (1875-1950) was the President of the Clark County Equal Rights Association in 1915, a local of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association. She is also known as Mrs. Lucien Beckner.

Associated Organization: Wolnitzek, Rowekamp & DeMarcus, P.S.C. Attorneys at Law
County: Kenton
Name of Historic Site: George W. Hamilton House
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Home of Mattie Bruce Reynolds
Years of Importance:1894-1912, 1912-1920
Reynolds was a part of the woman suffrage movement in Northern Kentucky and was connected nationally as well.

Associated Organization: Cave Hill Cemetery
County: Jefferson
Name of Historic Site: Cave Hill Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Emma J. Woerner
Years of Importance:1920-Present
Emma Jane Woerner was the President of the Louisville Equal Rights Association and a member of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association.

Associated Organization: Christ Church Cathedral
County: Fayette
Name of Historic Site: Christ Church Cathedral
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Site of the funeral of Jessie Leigh Hutchinson
Years of Importance:1920-Present
Jessie Leigh Hutchinson was the First Vice President of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association from 1912-1915 and in 1917. She was also a member of the Women's Club of Central Kentucky. Jessie Leigh Hutchinson is also known was Mrs. E.L. Hutchinson.

Associated Organization: Trinity Episcopal Church of Covington Kentucky
County: Kenton
Name of Historic Site: Trinity Church
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: The annual convention of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association was held at Trinity Church in 1897, 1901, 1902, and 1903.
Years of Importance:1894-1912

Associated Organization: Madison County Government
County: Madison
Name of Historic Site: Madison County Courthouse
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: While in Kentucky during 1897 to help organize the state, DeVoe presented a lecture at the courthouse in Richmond.
Years of Importance:1894-1912

Associated Organization: Anderson County Sheriff's Office
County: Anderson
Name of Historic Site: Anderson County Court House
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Site of a 1914 debate on suffrage between Anderson County High School and Mercer County High School arranged by the Anderson County Equal Rights Association.
Years of Importance:1912-1920

Associated Organization: Germantown Christian Church
County: Bracken
Name of Historic Site: Germantown Christian Church and Maple Grove Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Alice Lloyd
Years of Importance:1920-Present
Lloyd was a Northern Kentucky suffragist who grew up on a farm in Mason County. She was a member of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association, and served as the from to . When she passed away in 1951, her funeral was held in Germantown Christian Church and she was buried in the cemetery nearby, called Maple Grove. Though she has the same name as it's founder, she is in no away connected to Alice Lloyd College in Knott County.

County: Fulton
Name of Historic Site: Hubbard Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Sallie M. Hubbard
Years of Importance:1920-Present
Sallie M. Hubbard was a passionate member of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association. She served as the superintendent of the National Enrollment Department, and once donated $1000 to the organization. She is also known as Mrs. S.M. Hubbard.

Associated Organization: Cave Hill Cemetery
County: Jefferson
Name of Historic Site: Cave Hill Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Alice Barbee Castleman
Years of Importance:1920-Present
Alice Barbee Castleman was the First Vice President of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association in 1910 and 1911. She is also known was Mrs. John B. Castleman.

Associated Organization: A.R. Dyche Memorial Park
County: Laurel
Name of Historic Site: A.R. Dyche Memorial Park
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Sarah Hardin Sawyer
Years of Importance:1912-1920, 1920-Present
Sarah Hardin Sawyer (1857-1916) was a member of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association, and served as the Superintendent of the Department of Bible Study. She also served as the recording secretary for the Laurel County Equal Rights Association, founded in London on July 8, 1889.

Associated Organization: Pike County Clerk
County: Pike
Name of Historic Site: Pike County Courthouse
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Glenn and Freeman spoke on suffrage at the Pike County Courthouse in Pikeville, KY
Years of Importance:1912-1920
After the speeches by Glenn and Freeman, the Pike County Suffrage Association was formed.

Associated Organization: The Seelbach Hilton Louisville
County: Jefferson
Name of Historic Site: Seelbach Hotel
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: On March 29, 1920, at the Seelbach Hotel, Governor Morrow will sign a bill granting Kentucky women Presidential suffrage.
Years of Importance:1920-Present
While the 19th amendment was ratified in Kentucky in January of 1920, by the time the legislative session was ending in March, another state was still needed to make the amendment official. A bill to grant women Presidential suffrage in Kentucky was passed so that women would be able to vote in the Presidential election that November, regardless of the state of the 19th amendment.

Associated Organization: Arlington Cemetery
County: Carlisle
Name of Historic Site: Arlington Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Ida Stanley
Years of Importance:1894-1912, 1912-1920, 1920-Present
Stanley (1858-1900) was a member of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association. She was also the President of the Arlington Equal Rights Association.

County: Carter
Name of Historic Site: Old Grayson Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Juliet Lansdowne Powers
Years of Importance:1920-Present
Juliet Lansdowne Powers was a member of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association and the President of the Carter County Equal Rights Association.

Associated Organization: Cave Hill Cemetery
County: Jefferson
Name of Historic Site: Cave Hill Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Margaret Weissinger Castleman
Years of Importance:1920-Present
Margaret Weissinger Castleman was a member of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association, serving as the Second Vice President from 1919-1920. She is also known as Mrs. Samuel T. Castleman.

County: Franklin
Name of Historic Site: South-Willis House
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Home of Christine Bradley South
Years of Importance:1894-1912, 1912-1920
South was the president of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association from 1916-1919. She was the daughter of a Kentucky governor, William O. Bradley and Margaret Duncan Bradley. She is also known as Mrs. John Glover South.

Associated Organization: Ashland Cemetery
County: Boyd
Name of Historic Site: Ashland Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Sarah T. Bagley
Years of Importance:1920-Present
Bagley (1848-1925) was a member of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association and the secretary of the Ashland Equal Rights Association.

Associated Organization: Ashland Cemetery
County: Boyd
Name of Historic Site: Ashland Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Mary Elliott Flanery
Years of Importance:1920-Present
Flanery (1867-1933) was the first woman to serve in the Kentucky House of Representatives and also a supporter a woman suffrage. She was a native of Elliott County, but lived across the Appalachian region of Kentucky, in places including Pikeville and Catlettsburg.

Associated Organization: Lexington Cemetery
County: Fayette
Name of Historic Site: Lexington Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Mary C. Cramer
Years of Importance:1912-1920, 1920-Present
Mary C. Cramer (1847-1915) was an officer of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association, serving as Vice President from 1892 to 1913.

Associated Organization: Kentucky Historical Society
County: Franklin
Name of Historic Site: Old State Capitol
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Suffrage supporter John D. White served as a member of the House of Representatives in this building
Years of Importance:1791-1879, 1880-1894
John D. White was a politician from Clay County and also a suffrage supporter. His wife, Alice Harris White was the secretary and treasurer of the Louisville Equal Rights Association. John's sister Laura White was also a suffrage supporter, serving as an active member in the Kentucky Equal Rights Association for many years.

Associated Organization: Cave Hill Cemetery
County: Jefferson
Name of Historic Site: Cave Hill Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Virginia Robb McDowell
Years of Importance:1920-Present
Virginia Robb McDowell served as the Recording Secretary of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association from 1913, 1914, and 1917 and as the First Vice President in 1915. She was married to Robinson A. McDowell, a first cousin of Kentucky Equal Rights Association President Madeline McDowell Breckinridge. She is also known as Mrs. R.A. McDowell.

Associated Organization: Cave Hill Cemetery
County: Jefferson
Name of Historic Site: Cave Hill Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Julia D. Henning
Years of Importance:1920-Present
Julia D. Henning was a member of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association, and served as the Chairman of Congressional Work in 1917 and 1919.

Associated Organization: Frankfort Cemetery
County: Franklin
Name of Historic Site: Frankfort Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Christine Bradley South
Years of Importance:1920-Present
South was the president of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association from 1916-1919. She was the daughter of a Kentucky governor, William O. Bradley and Margaret Duncan Bradley. She is also known as Mrs. John Glover South.

Associated Organization: Shaker Village at Pleasant Hill
County: Mercer
Name of Historic Site: Shakertown
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Home of Mary Settles, a Shaker who was also a supporter of suffrage
Years of Importance:1912-1920, 1920-Present
Mary Settles, or Sister Mary Settles as she was more commonly known, was the last living woman Shaker in the Shaker community near Harrodsburg, Kentucky that is now known as Shaker Village at Pleasant Hill. Near the end of her life, she passed away in 1923, she was interviewed and expressed her support for suffrage, stating that she felt women getting the right to vote was a great achievement.

Associated Organization: Lexington Cemetery
County: Fayette
Name of Historic Site: Lexington Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Alice Lehman Carpenter
Years of Importance:1920-Present
Alice Lehman Carpenter (1854-1940) was an officer of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association, serving as the Corresponding Secretary in 1905.

Associated Organization: Oak Grove Cemetery
County: McCracken
Name of Historic Site: Oak Grove Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Josephine Fowler Post
Years of Importance:1920-Present
Paducah native Josephine Fowler Post was a suffragist involved in local, state, and national work. She was the President of the Paducah Equal Rights Association, a member of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association, on the congressional committee of NAWSA in 1917, and after the passage of the 19th Amendment, she was a leader in the League of Women Voters. In 1915, she was named an Honorary Vice President of KERA. She is also known as Mrs. Edmund Post.

Associated Organization: Linden Grove Cemetery
County: Kenton
Name of Historic Site: Linden Grove Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Lura Baker Rothier
Years of Importance:1920-Present
Lura Baker Rothier was the Third Vice President of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association in 1915. She is also known as Mrs. F.A. Rothier

County: Boyd
Name of Historic Site: Elliott Hall
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Home of Mary Elliott Flanery
Flanery was the first women from Kentucky to serve in the state House of Representatives. She held this position from 1921-1923. There is a historic marker commemorating Flanery at this location as well.

Associated Organization: Linden Grove Cemetery
County: Kenton
Name of Historic Site: Linden Grove Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Nancy Sanford McLaughlin
Years of Importance:1920-Present
Nancy Sanford McLaughlin (1852-1945) was a member of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association. She served as a Vice-President of the organization from 1901-1912.

Associated Organization: Evergreen Cemetery
County: Campbell
Name of Historic Site: Evergreen Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Emma Massum Roebuck
Years of Importance:1920-Present
Dr. Roebuck was a physician and officer of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association serving as the Recording Secretary. She was also active in her local suffrage organization, often holding meetings at her home.

Associated Organization: Richmond Cemetery
County: Madison
Name of Historic Site: Richmond Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Henrietta Bronston Chenault
Years of Importance:1912-1920, 1920-Present
Chenault (1835-1918) was a suffragist and temperance supporter who served as the corresponding secretary of the Fayette County Equal Rights Association. She also had multiple daughters involved in the suffrage movement, Pearl Chenault-Evans and Dr. Emma Chenault Runyon.

Associated Organization: Our Lady of the Mountains School
County: Johnson
Name of Historic Site: Mayo Mansion
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Home of Alice Jane Mayo, a member of the 1915 Advisory Board for the Kentucky Equal Rights Association
Years of Importance:1912-1920
Alice Jane Meek Mayo was the wife of land and coal speculator John C.C. Mayo. Alice helped her husband in the land speculating that built a large fortune, that would allow them to built a mansion in Paintsville. In 1915, Alice was listed as one of the members of the Advisory Board for the Kentucky Equal Rights Association, connecting her to the suffrage movement.

Associated Organization: Garrad County Government
County: Garrad
Name of Historic Site: Garrad County Courthouse
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Henry gave a suffrage speech at the courthouse in Lancaster, Kentucky on April 29, 1897.
Years of Importance:1894-1912

Associated Organization: Richmond Cemetery
County: Madison
Name of Historic Site: Richmond Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Ellen V. Gibson
Years of Importance:1920-Present
Ellen Virginia Gibson (1845-1922) was a member of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association, and served as the Superintendent of the Bible Study Department.

Associated Organization: Kentucky Historical Society
County: Franklin
Name of Historic Site: Old State Capitol
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: In 1872, Cutler and Longley spoke at a hearing before the legislature.
Years of Importance:1792-1879
Cutler and Longley were both representatives from national suffrage organizations sent to help advance the suffrage cause in Kentucky.

Associated Organization: Highland Cemetery
County: Kenton
Name of Historic Site: Highland Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Jessie Edith Riddell Firth
Years of Importance:1920-Present
Firth (1864-1950) was a suffrage leader in Covington and also the second vice President of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association. Besides her leadership, she also contributed suffrage songs to the movement. After women got the right to vote, Firth was a leader in the League of Women Voters. She is also known as Mrs. Charles Firth.

Associated Organization: The Temple Cemetery
County: Jefferson
Name of Historic Site: The Temple Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Rebecca R. Judah
Years of Importance:1920-Present
Rebecca R. Judah was a member of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association, serving as a Vice President and Treasurer during the 1910s. She is also known as Mrs. J.B. Judah

Associated Organization: Oak Grove Cemetery
County: McCracken
Name of Historic Site: Oak Grove Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Dorothy Hellner Koger
Years of Importance:1920-Present
Koger (1857-1930) was a member of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association, and was also the president of the Paducah Equal Rights Association.

Associated Organization: Frankfort Cemetery
County: Franklin
Name of Historic Site: Frankfort Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Hallie Herndon
Years of Importance:1894-1912, 1912-1920, 1920-Present
Hallie Herndon was a member of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association. She was elected to be the first official State Historian for the organization in 1903. Herndon also served as the President of the Frankfort Equal Rights Association.

Associated Organization: Richmond Cemetery
County: Madison
Name of Historic Site: Richmond Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Kate Rose Wiggins
Years of Importance:1920-Present
Wiggins (1854-1927) was the Recording Secretary for the Kentucky Equal Rights Association from 1898-1899. She also served as the secretary for the Madison County Equal Rights Association.

Associated Organization: Evergreen Cemetery
County: Campbell
Name of Historic Site: Evergreen Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Ann Shaler Berry
Years of Importance:1894-1912, 1912-1920, 1920-Present
Shaler (1846-1908) was a suffragist from Newport who was connected to national leaders like Susan B. Anthony, who stayed at Berry's house when she gave a speech in Newport in 1879.

Associated Organization: Glasgow Municipal Cemetery
County: Barren
Name of Historic Site: Glasgow Municipal Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Emma Evans
Years of Importance:1912-1920, 1920-Present
Emma Evans was a member of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association, and the Glasgow Equal Rights Association. She served as the Treasurer and President of the latter organization. She is also known as Mrs. J.C. Evans.

Associated Organization: Frankfort Cemetery
County: Franklin
Name of Historic Site: Frankfort Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Margaret Robinson Duncan Bradley
Years of Importance:1920-Present
Bradley (1846-1923), a native of Garrad County, lived in Lancaster for most of her life and served as the President of the Lancaster Equal Rights Association. She was also the mother of Kentucky Equal Rights Association President Christine Bradley South.

Associated Organization: Rosehill-Elmwood Cemetery
County: Davies
Name of Historic Site: Rosehill-Elmwood Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Fanny Hays
Years of Importance:1920-Present
Fanny Hays (1863-1930) was a member of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association, serving for a while as a Vice-President and Recording Secretary of the organization. She was also the Recording Secretary of the Owensboro Equal Rights Association. She is also known as Mrs. J.D. Hays.

Associated Organization: Odd Fellows Cemetery
County: Hopkins
Name of Historic Site: Odd Fellows Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Virginia Franceway
Years of Importance:1920-Present
Franceway (1842-1920) was a member of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association, and the President of the Hopkins County Equal Rights Association.

Associated Organization: Hindman Settlement School
County: Knott
Name of Historic Site: Hindman Settlement School
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Obenchain sent suffrage literature to Katherine Pettit's settlement school in Hindman in 1908, because she considered it a good "field for suffrage work."
Years of Importance:1894-1912
Katherine Pettit founded the Hindman Settlement School in 1902 through her work with the Women's Christian Temperance Union. She was also involved with the Kentucky Equal Rights Association. Lida Calvert Obenchain was the longtime Press Superintendent of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association.

Associated Organization: St. James African Methodist Episcopal Church
County: Boyle
Name of Historic Site: St. James African Methodist Episcopal Church
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Mary E. Britton gave a speech on suffrage before the Colored Teachers Association at this location on July 7, 1887.
Years of Importance:1880-1894
Mary E. Britton was a physician and activist in Lexington. She was one of the first African American women to graduate from Berea College, where she earned her teaching degree. She continued her education and became a licensed physician, becoming the first African American woman in Lexington with this distinction.

Associated Organization: Kings Way Church
County: Boyd
Name of Historic Site: Christian Church of Ashland
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Church building designed by architect and suffrage supporter Laura White. It was also the site of a speech by Laura Clay in 1901, after which the Ashland Equal Rights Association was organized.
Years of Importance:1894-1912
Laura White was a native Clay County, born near Manchester. She received as education as an architect, an uncommon profession for women in the nineteenth century. She was also a supporter of suffrage, and a member of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association.

Associated Organization: Barbourville Cemetery
County: Knox
Name of Historic Site: Barbourville Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Martha Ann Tinsley
Years of Importance:1920-Present
Martha Ann Tinsley (1853-1936) was a member of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association, and President of the Barbourville Equal Rights Association when it was formed in 1897. She is also known as Mrs. M.A. Tinsley.

County: Hopkins
Name of Historic Site: Hopkins County Court House
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Susan Fessenden gave a speech at the Hopkins County Court House on September 16, 1905.
Years of Importance:1894-1912

County: Clay
Name of Historic Site: White Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of John D. White
Years of Importance:1920-Present
John D. White was a politician from Clay County and also a suffrage supporter. His wife, Alice Harris White was the secretary and treasurer of the Louisville Equal Rights Association. John's sister Laura White was also a suffrage supporter, serving as an active member in the Kentucky Equal Rights Association for many years. The three of attended the 1908 KERA convention.

Associated Organization: Cove Haven Cemetery
County: Fayette
Name of Historic Site: Cove Haven Cemetery (Greenwood Cemetery)
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Mary E. Britton
Years of Importance:1920-Present
Mary E. Britton was a physician and activist in Lexington. She was one of the first African American women to graduate from Berea College, where she earned her teaching degree. She continued her education and became a licensed physician, becoming the first African American woman in Lexington with this distinction. Throughout her life, she was also a supporter of the suffrage movement, giving speeches to support the cause.

Associated Organization: Barbourville Cemetery
County: Knox
Name of Historic Site: Barbourville Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Elizabeth Pogue Tinsley
Years of Importance:1912-1920, 1920-Present
Elizabeth Pogue Tinsley was a member of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association, and also the Barbourville Equal Rights Association. She served as the treasurer for the latter organization. She is also known as Mrs. J.H. Tinsley.

Associated Organization: Memory Gardens
County: Hancock
Name of Historic Site: Hawesville Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Martha Hall Hennen
Years of Importance:1912-1920, 1920-Present
Hennen (1836-1914) was a member of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association and also the Chairman of the Hawesville Committee of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association in 1905.

County: Clay
Name of Historic Site: White Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Alice Harris White
Years of Importance:1920-Present
Alice Harris White (1856-1935) was a member of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association and the secretary and treasurer of the Louisville Equal Rights Association. She was married to John D. White, and is sometimes noted with this name.

Associated Organization: Berea College
County: Madison
Name of Historic Site: Berea College
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Both Britton sisters, Mary and Julia, attended Berea College and became the first two African American women to graduate from the institution.
Years of Importance:1792-1879
Mary E. Britton and Julia Britton Hooks were sisters born in Kentucky who both worked for social reform, including women's right to vote.

Associated Organization: Trimble County Government
County: Trimble
Name of Historic Site: Trimble County Courthouse
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Glenn gave a speech here during her 1914 suffrage tour across Kentucky. She was sent from NAWSA to help organize new suffrage organizations in the state
Years of Importance:1912-1920

Associated Organization: Barbourville Cemetery
County: Knox
Name of Historic Site: Barbourville Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Ada Franklin Walton
Years of Importance:1894-1912, 1912-1920, 1920-Present
Ada Franklin Walton (1871-1903) was a member of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association. She served as the secretary of the Barbourville Equal Rights Association as well.

Associated Organization: Cave City Cemetery
County: Barren
Name of Historic Site: Cave City Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Lizzie Tucker
Years of Importance:1920-Present
Tucker (1863-1947) was a member of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association, and also the Chairman of the Cave City Committee of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association in 1905.

County: Clay
Name of Historic Site: White Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Laura White
Years of Importance:1920-Present
Laura White (1852-1929) was a native of Clay County, born near Manchester. She received as education as an architect, an uncommon profession for women in the nineteenth century. She was also a supporter of suffrage, and a member of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association and the Ashland Equal Rights Association.

Associated Organization: Montgomery County Government
County: Montgomery
Name of Historic Site: Montgomery County Court House
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: In January of 1914, Madeline McDowell Breckinridge spoke here, accompanied by Beatrice Moses.
Years of Importance:1912-1920
Madeline McDowell Breckinridge was the President of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association from 1912-1915 and 1919-1920.

Associated Organization: Gallatin County Government
County: Gallatin
Name of Historic Site: Gallatin County Courthouse
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Glenn gave a speech here during her 1914 suffrage tour across Kentucky. She was sent from NAWSA to help organize new suffrage organizations in the state
Years of Importance:1912-1920

Associated Organization: Wilmore Cemetery, operations by the city of Wilmore
County: Jessamine
Name of Historic Site: Wilmore Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Mary Wallingford Hughes
Years of Importance:1912-1920, 1920-Present
Mary Wallingford Hughes was a member of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association and the Wilmore Equal Rights Association. She was the Vice-President of the Wilmore ERA in 1897.

Associated Organization: Fernwood Cemetery
County: Henderson
Name of Historic Site: Fernwood Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Eliza Bell Atkinson Lockett
Years of Importance:1920-Present
Lockett (1853-1933) was a member of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association, and also the Chairman of the Henderson Committee of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association in 1905. Also known as Mrs. J.W. Lockett.

Associated Organization: Ohio County Government
County: Ohio
Name of Historic Site: Hartford Courthouse
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Glenn gave a speech here during her 1914 suffrage tour across Kentucky. She was sent from NAWSA to help organize new suffrage organizations in the state
Years of Importance:1894-1912

Associated Organization: Christian County Clerk's Office
County: Christian
Name of Historic Site: Christian County Courthouse
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: In June of 1914, Madeline McDowell Breckinridge gave a speech at the courthouse in Hopkinsville
Years of Importance:1912-1920
Madeline McDowell Breckinridge was the President of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association from 1912-1915 and 1919-1920.

Associated Organization: Mapleview Cemetery
County: Crittenden
Name of Historic Site: Mapleview Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Evelyn Shelby Roberts
Years of Importance:1920-Present
Roberts was a member of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association, and also the President of the Crittenden County Equal Suffrage League in 1917. She is also known was Mrs. George P. Roberts.

Associated Organization: Bernard Hall Farm
County: Madison
Name of Historic Site: Homelands/Samuel Bennett House
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Birth place of Belle Harris Bennett
Years of Importance:1792-1879, 1880-1894
Bennett (1852-1922) was a member of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association and beyond her work championing woman suffrage, she was also active in church reform.

Associated Organization: Lawrence County Government
County: Lawrence
Name of Historic Site: Louisa Courthouse
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Glenn gave a speech here during her 1914 suffrage tour across Kentucky. She was sent from NAWSA to help organize new suffrage organizations in the state
Years of Importance:1894-1912

Associated Organization: Eastern Kentucky University
County: Madison
Name of Historic Site: Eastern Kentucky State Normal School
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: In May of 1911, Madeline McDowell Breckinridge spoke on school suffrage at this location.
Years of Importance:1894-1912
Madeline McDowell Breckinridge was the President of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association from 1912-1915 and 1919-1920.

Associated Organization: Rockcastle County Government
County: Rockcastle
Name of Historic Site: Rockcastle County Courthouse
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Henry gave a speech at the Rockcastle County Courthouse in Mt. Vernon
Years of Importance:1880-1894
The Courthouse that stands today is a newer building, but at the same location as the one in existence in 1891.

Associated Organization: Lexington Cemetery
County: Fayette
Name of Historic Site: Lexington Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Laura Clay
Years of Importance:1920-Present
Clay (1849-1941) is buried in Section J, Lot 6.

Associated Organization: Kentucky Historical Marker Program
County: Boyd
Name of Historic Site: Historic Marker #2136
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Marker commemorating Flanery's work for suffrage and her appointment to the Kentucky House of Representatives in 1921. She was the first woman in Kentucky to hold a position in the legislature.
Years of Importance:1912-1920, 1920-Present

County: Kenton
Name of Historic Site: Eugenia B. Farmer Home
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Home of Eugenia B. Farmer, a prominent member of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association and the Kenton County Equal Rights Association.
Years of Importance:1880-1894

Associated Organization: Kentucky State Government
County: Franklin
Name of Historic Site: Kentucky State Capitol
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Henry spoke during the 1890 General Assembly on the Property Rights Bill, which called for increased property rights for married women.
Years of Importance:1880-1894
Henry was a Versailles resident and member of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association in the late nineteenth century. She was particularly involved in efforts to get legislation on topics such as property rights for women passed and lobbied in Frankfort with other KERA members on multiple occasions.

Associated Organization: Linden Grove Cemetery
County: Kenton
Name of Historic Site: Linden Grove Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Dr. Louise Southgate
Years of Importance:1920-Present
Dr. Louise Southgate (1857-1941) was a physician and also an active member of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association, where she served as the Superintendent of the organization's Department of Hygiene and Physical Culture.

Associated Organization: Madison County Government
County: Madison
Name of Historic Site: Madison County Courthouse
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Anthony gave multiple speeches in Richmond, including one at the courthouse in 1879. Her visit was arranged by Mary Barr Clay, and helped to spur the founding of the Madison County Equal Rights Association.
Years of Importance:1792-1879

Associated Organization: Cave Hill Cemetery
County: Jefferson
Name of Historic Site: Cave Hill Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Susan Look Avery
Years of Importance:1912-1920, 1920-Present
Avery (1817-1915) was a key leader in both the women's club and suffrage movements, as a member of the Women's Club of Louisville and the Kentucky Equal Rights Association.

Associated Organization: Kentucky Historical Marker Program
County: Warren
Name of Historic Site: Historic Marker #2240
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Marker to commemorate Obenchain's work as an author and suffragist.
Years of Importance:1880-1894 1894-1912 1912-1920

Associated Organization: Richmond Cemetery
County: Madison
Name of Historic Site: Richmond Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Sarah "Sallie" Clay Bennett
Years of Importance:1920-Present
Sallie Clay Bennett (1841-1935) was the daughter of Mary Jane Warfield Clay and sister to Laura Clay and Mary Barr Clay, each members of the suffrage movement. Bennett herself was a prominent member of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association and President of the Madison County Equal Rights Association.

Associated Organization: First Unitarian Church of Lousiville
County: Jefferson
Name of Historic Site: First Unitarian Church
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Catt and Anthony spoke on suffrage at the First Unitarian Church in Lousiville in 1895 during an organizing tour of the South.
Years of Importance:1894-1912

Associated Organization: The Bennett House Bed and Breakfast
County: Madison
Name of Historic Site: The Bennett House Bed and Breakfast
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Home of Belle Harris Bennett
Years of Importance:1880-1894, 1894-1912
Bennett (1852-1922) was a member of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association and beyond her work championing woman suffrage, she was also active in church reform.

Associated Organization: Kentucky Historical Marker Program
County: Franklin
Name of Historic Site: Historic Marker #2167
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Marker commemorating Cromwell and her election in 1923 as the secretary of state in Kentucky. She was the first woman to hold this position in Kentucky.
Years of Importance:1920-Present

Associated Organization: Richmond Cemetery
County: Madison
Name of Historic Site: Richmond Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Belle Harris Bennett
Years of Importance:1920-Present
Bennett (1852-1922) was a member of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association and beyond her work championing woman suffrage, she was also active in church reform.

Associated Organization: Kentucky Historical Marker Program
County: Madison
Name of Historic Site: Historic Marker #1872
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Marker commemorating Beauchamp's work for reform causes including prohibition and woman suffrage.
Years of Importance:1880-1894 1894-1912 1912-1920

Associated Organization: Lexington Cemetery
County: Fayette
Name of Historic Site: Lexington Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Sarah Gibson Humphreys
Years of Importance:1894-1912, 1912-1920, 1920-Present
Sarah Gibson Humphreys (1830-1907) was a member of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association. Humphreys frequently wrote publicly about her suffrage beliefs and her papers were often included in the KERA conventions. She was especially concerned with the campaign to raise the age of consent in Kentucky. She was born in Louisiana to parents with Kentucky connections, and as an adult split her time between her Woodford County, Kentucky home and her properties in Louisiana. She is buried in the Lexington Cemetery in Section K, Lot 7.

Associated Organization: Johnson Memorial Cemetery
County: Pike
Name of Historic Site: Johnson Memorial Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Katherine Gudger Langley.
Years of Importance:1920-Present
Langley was the first woman in Kentucky elected to congress, serving in the United States House of Representatives from 1927 to 1931. She was born in 1888 in North Carolina and died in 1948 in Pikeville, Kentucky.

Associated Organization: Versailles Cemetery
County: Woodford
Name of Historic Site: Versailles Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Josephine K. Henry
Years of Importance:1920-Present
Henry was born in 1846 and passed away in 1928. She was a well-known member of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association during the late nineteenth century, but would evantually part ways with the organization. She wrote a great deal about suffrage, property rights of women, and marriage and many of her works were published and are still available today.

Associated Organization: Eastern Kentucky University
County: Madison
Name of Historic Site: Eastern Kentucky University
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Roark would serve as acting President of the Eastern Kentucky Normal School from 1909 to 1910 after her husband passed away.
Years of Importance:1894-1912
Roark was an active member of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association, serving as an officer, superintendent of the political study department, and sitting on various committees.

Associated Organization: Lexington Cemetery
County: Fayette
Name of Historic Site: Lexington Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Madeline McDowell Breckinridge
Years of Importance:1920-Present
Breckinridge was an active social reformer throughout her adult life, and woman suffrage was one of many causes she would champion. She served as President of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association from 1912-1915 and 1919-1920. She is buried in Section D, Lot 9.

County: Jefferson
Name of Historic Site: Masonic Temple
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Lucy Stone, New England abolitionist and women's rights advocate, spoke here in 1853.
Years of Importance:1792-1879
After the Civil War, Stone, her husband Henry Blackwell and their daughter Alice Stone Blackwell, all became prominent national suffrage leaders.

Associated Organization: Louisville Gardens
County: Jefferson
Name of Historic Site: Armory Building
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Ida B. Wells spoke here at the national convention of the National Association of Colored Women in 1910.
Years of Importance:1894-1912
Wells was a leader of the African-American woman's suffrage movement.

Associated Organization: 4th Street Live/Gordon Biersch Brewery Restaurant
County: Jefferson
Name of Historic Site: Old Opera House (now Kaufman-Straus)
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: This was the site of the 1881 meeting of the American Woman Suffrage Association, the first time Louisville hosted a national suffrage event. The convention also gave birth to the state's first organization, the Kentucky Woman Suffrage Association.
Years of Importance:1880-1894

Associated Organization: Louisville Free Public Library, Main Library
County: Jefferson
Name of Historic Site: Louisville Free Public Library
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Louisville suffragists frequently used the Public Library for chapter meetings and public forums during the years from 1908 to 1923.
Years of Importance:1894-1912, 1912-1920, 1920-Present

Associated Organization: Lexington Cemetery
County: Fayette
Name of Historic Site: Lexington Cemetery
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Burial place of Mary Jane Warfield Clay
Years of Importance:1894-1912
Mary Jane Warfield Clay (1815-1900) was an early leader in the suffrage movement in Kentucky, forming a suffrage club in her home in 1879. Her daughers would become the most well known Kentucky suffragists of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Her grave is in Section J, Lot 6.

County: Jefferson
Name of Historic Site: Caroline A. Leech Home
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Home of Caroline A. Leech
Years of Importance:1880-1894, 1912-1920
Caroline A. Leech was a leading suffragist in Louisville, who also played a prominent role in the Kentucky Equal Rights Association.

Associated Organization: Kentucky State Parks
County: Madison
Name of Historic Site: White Hall
Event(s) / Use Associated With Historic Site: Childhood home of Laura Clay.
Years of Importance:1792-1879
Clay was a founding member of the Kentucky Equal Rights Association and served as President of the organization from 1888-1912. She was also active at a local level, acting as President of the Fayette Equal Rights Association, and on a national scale as a member and officer of the NAWSA. Clay became the face of the woman suffrage movement in Kentucky.