Randolph Hollingsworth, "African American Women Voters in Lexington's School Suffrage Times, 1895-1902: Race Matters in the History of the Kentucky Woman Suffrage Movement," Ohio Valley History 20 (Spring 2020): 30-53.

Randolph Hollingsworth's picture

Author: Randolph Hollingsworth

Title: "African American Women Voters in Lexington's School Suffrage Times, 1895-1902: Race Matters in the History of the Kentucky Woman Suffrage Movement"

Publication: Ohio Valley History 20 (Spring 2020): 30-53.

N.B. This issue is available for a short time online, free and open via The Filson Historical Society website: https://filsonhistorical.org/wp-content/uploads/OVH_SPRING_20_MUSE.pdf

This article focuses in on the window of time in which women voted in school board elections in three cities in Kentucky (1895-1901), and the author explores how Lexington's partial suffrage "experiment" exposed deep roots of Kentucky racism. Instead of providing a stepping-stone to full woman suffrage as Kentucky suffragists had hoped, partial suffrage was revoked by legislators intent on maintaining their majority party power, destroying the organized efforts by reformers in a rival political party through disfranchisement, and curbing African-American civil rights in Kentucky. Hollingsworth is an independent scholar who, while working as Assistant Provost at the University of Kentucky, co-founded the Kentucky Woman Suffrage Project. She now lives in New Zealand though she continues to moderate the H-Kentucky network, serve on the advisory group for the National Votes for Women Trail (sponsored by the National Collaborative for Women's History Sites), and continues as a board member for the Breaking the Bronze Ceiling campaign to build a monument to women's history in Lexington.


This post supports the collection of resources for the Kentucky Woman Suffrage Project's Annotated Bibliography - see the full list of KWSP's primary, secondary and tertiary sources here: https://networks.h-net.org/kentucky-woman-suffrage-bibliography