Webinar | New Books in Daoist Studies

Noelle Giuffrida's picture

New Books in Daoist Studies

 

Saturday May 22, 7:00 PM EDT (Sunday, May 23, 7:00 AM HKT)

 

Please join us for interviews and conversations with the authors about their two new books:

 

 A Library of Clouds: The Scripture of the Immaculate Numen and the Rewriting of Daoist Texts

(University of Hawai‘i Press and The Chinese University of Hong Kong Press, New Daoist Studies Series, 2020)

Chao-jan Chang 張超然 and Jonathan Pettit 裴玄錚

 

AND

 

Knotting the Banner: Ritual and Relationship in Daoist Practice

(University of Hawai‘i Press and The Chinese University of Hong Kong Press, New Daoist Studies Series, 2021)

David Mozina 莫達夫

 

Free and open to the public. To register, please click the following link:  

https://tennessee.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJYtfumoqTkjG9PRF70rIJYxwxGE0BHpEf4D

 

 

PROGRAM:

 

A Library of Clouds: The Scripture of the Immaculate Numen and the Rewriting of Daoist Texts

(University of Hawai‘i Press and The Chinese University of Hong Kong Press, New Daoist Studies Series, 2020)

Chao-jan Chang 張超然 and Jonathan Pettit 裴玄錚

 

Interviewer: Dominic Steavu 史德阿夫

 

From early times, Daoist writers claimed to receive scriptures via revelation from heavenly beings. In numerous cases, these writings were composed over the course of many nights and by different mediums. New revelations were often hastily appended, and the resulting unevenness gave rise to the impression that Daoist texts often appear slapdash and contain contradictions. A Library of Clouds focuses on the re-writing of Daoist scriptures in the Upper Clarity (Shangqing) lineage in fourth- and fifth-century China. Scholarship on Upper Clarity Daoism has been dominated by attempts to uncover “original” or “authentic” texts, which has resulted in the neglect of later scriptures―including the work fully translated and annotated here, the Scripture of the Immaculate Numen, one of the Three Wonders (sanqi) and among the most prized Daoist texts in medieval China. The scripture’s lack of a coherent structure and its different authorial voices have led many to see it not as a unified work but the creation of different editors who shaped and reshaped it over time.

A Library of Clouds constructs new ways of understanding the complex authorship of texts like the Scripture of the Immaculate Numen and their place in early medieval Daoism. It stresses their significance in understanding the ways in which manuscripts were written, received, and distributed in early medieval China. By situating the scripture within its immediate hagiographic and ritual contexts, it suggests that this kind of revelatory literature is best understood as a pastiche of ideas, a process of weaving together previously circulating notions and beliefs into a new scriptural fabric.

 

 

Knotting the Banner: Ritual and Relationship in Daoist Practice

(University of Hawai‘i Press and The Chinese University of Hong Kong Press, New Daoist Studies Series, 2021)

David Mozina 莫達夫

 

Interviewer: Noelle Giuffrida 焦娜薇

 

In the hills of China’s central Hunan province, an anxious young apprentice officiates over a Daoist ritual known as the Banner Rite to Summon Sire Yin. Before a crowd of masters, relatives, and villagers―and the entire pantheon of gods and deceased masters ritually invited to witness the event―he seeks to summon Celestial Lord Yin Jiao, the ferocious deity who supplies the exorcistic power to protect and heal bodies and spaces from illness and misfortune. If the apprentice cannot bring forth the deity, the rite is considered a failure and the ordination suspended: His entire professional career hangs in the balance before it even begins.

This richly textured study asks how the Banner Rite works or fails to work in its own terms. How do the cosmological, theological, and anthropological assumptions ensconced in the ritual itself account for its own efficacy or inefficacy? Weaving together ethnography, textual analysis, photography, and film, David J. Mozina invites readers into the religious world of ritual masters in today’s south China. He shows that the efficacy of rituals like the Banner Rite is driven by the ability of a ritual master to form an intimate relationship with exorcistic deities like Yin Jiao, which is far from guaranteed. Mozina reveals the ways in which such ritual claims are rooted in the great liturgical movements of the Song and Yuan dynasties (960–1368) and how they are performed these days amid the social and economic pressures of rural life in the post-Mao era.

Written for students and scholars of Daoism and Chinese religion, Knotting the Banner will also appeal to anthropologists and comparative religionists, especially those working on ritual.

 

Host:  Stephen R. Bokenkamp 伯夷

 

 

Free and open to the public. This webinar will be recorded. 

To register, please click the following link:  https://tennessee.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJYtfumoqTkjG9PRF70rIJYxwxGE0BHpEf4D

 

This event is organized by the Global Daoist Studies Forum.

More information at our website: https://manoa.hawaii.edu/global-daoist-studies-forum.

Please contact gdsf@hawaii.edu to sign up for our email list.