TOC: Contemporary European History. Special issue on Emotions in Protest Movements in Europe since 1917

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From: Serguei A. Oushakine <oushakin@Princeton.EDU>

Emotions in Protest Movements in Europe since 1917.
Special issue of Contemporary European History. Ed. by JOACHIM C. HÄBERLEN and RUSSELL A. SPINNEY.

It might seem trivial and mere common sense to note that revolts and revolutions are deeply emotional moments. In history books and newspapers, we read about the tense and emotionally charged atmosphere that leads to violence when protestors confront police forces, or about furious and passionate crowds acting in defiance of the ideal of rational and coldblooded politics. But rage and anger are not the only emotions involved in the politics of protest. Consider the iconic photographs of the summer strikes during the French Popular Front in 1936, depicting smiling workers occupying their factories and construction sites, or the cheering crowds storming the Berlin Wall in November 1989. Or consider the genre of protest songs, telling stories of solidarity and hope as well as deep sorrow. At times, social and political movements even made feelings their central concern, such as the hippy movement with its calls for free love. On the other side of the political spectrum, conservative as well as social democratic observers often denounced protests and riots as politically irrelevant outbreaks of hatred, or mocked the ‘hysterical’ fear of the peace movement during the 1980s. Somehow, these examples suggest, feelings mattered, yet how precisely they mattered is rarely investigated.

Contemporary European History
Volume 23, Number 4/November 2014

Introduction
pp.489-503
JOACHIM C. HÄBERLEN, RUSSELL A. SPINNEY,

Affective Neuroscience and the Causes of the Mutiny of the French 82nd Infantry Brigade
pp.505-522
ADAM DEREK ZIENTEK

Opposing Scientific Cruelty: The Emotions and Sensitivities of Protestors against Experiments on Animals
pp.523-543
CHRISTOPHE TRAÏNI

Emotions, Moral Batteries and High-Risk Activism: Understanding the Emotional Practices of the Spanish Anarchists under Franco's Dictatorship
pp.545-564
EDUARDO ROMANOS

Love, Peace and Rock 'n' Roll on Gorky Street: The 'Emotional Style' of the Soviet Hippie Community
pp.565-587
JULIANE FÜRST

A (Trans)National Emotional Community? Greek Political Songs and the Politicisation of Greek Migrants in West Germany in the 1960s and early 1970s
pp.589-614
NIKOLAOS PAPADOGIANNIS

Struggling for Feelings: The Politics of Emotions in the Radical New Left in West Germany, c.1968-84
pp.615-637
JOACHIM C. HÄBERLEN, JAKE P. SMITH

Concluding Thoughts
pp.639-644
DEBORAH GOULD,

'Foreshadows and Repercussions': Histories of Air War and the Recasting of Cities and Citizens
pp.645-655
ADAM PAGE