Announcment: History, Heritage, and Resilience : Case Studies in Saving Historical Heritage as Pyschosocial Support

John Morris's picture

I have made available on the Miyagi Gakuin Women's University Repository a pamplet containing 4 essays by young historians from Miyagi and Fukushima Prefectures, on their experiences working to preserve local historical and cultural heritage a form of psychosocial support for individuals and communities, after the triple disaster of March 2011. The essays should be of interest not only for historians who are concerned about how we can relate our expertise and knowlege to helping struggling communities find the will-power to start to rebuild, but also to anyone interested in discovering potential sources of community resilience. 

https://mgu.repo.nii.ac.jp/?action=pages_view_main&active_action=repository_view_main_item_detail&item_id=504&item_no=1&page_id=15&block_id=22

Of the four, my personal favourite is the 2nd essay by Momman Takeshi, and how he is working to rebuild the identity of the town of Tomioka, next door to the exploding reactors in Fukushima. This is a very intense narrative.

  1. SATŌ Daisuke                            Psychosocial Support and History: How Preserving Heritage Can Rebuild Communities                   
  2. MOMMA Takeshi                       Preservation of Historical and Cultural Heritage by Local Government within the Area Affected by the Fukushima Nuclear Reactor Accident      
  3. IZUMITA Kunihiko                    Local Histories in Evacuated Areas around Fukushima Daiichi Power Plant: The Case of the Izumita Family in Morotake, Fukushima Prefecture   
  4. TAKAHASHI Yō’ichi                  Social Outreach in Historical Conservation Work: Giving Feedback about What We

 

John Morris

Prof. Emeritus, Miyagi Gakuin Women's University

Sendai Japan