EAA Workshop: "Chinese and Japanese Ethics: History and Prospects"

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Type: 
Workshop
Date: 
December 17, 2019
Location: 
Japan
Subject Fields: 
Chinese History / Studies, East Asian History / Studies, Japanese History / Studies, Philosophy

Dear Colleagues,

Please join us at the East Asian Academy for New Liberal Arts (EAA) for a special workshop on Tuesday, December 17th at 16:00.

 

Chinese and Japanese Ethics: History and Prospects

Date: December 17th, 2019 16:00–19:15

Venue: Institute for Advanced Studies on Asia, Conference Room 1 (3F), The University of Tokyo Hongo Campus

Language: English | No Registration Required | Admission Free

https://www.eaa.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp/ja/2019/12/05/1870/

 

Abstract

This workshop considers classical Chinese and Japanese ethics and their application to society, and in relation to contemporary questions in moral philosophy. Panellists discuss topics such as the implications of Chinese and Japanese philosophy on the theory of modernization; the historical development of filial piety (孝) in Japan and its prospects for awakening a form of modernity that emphasizes the individual; the way in which the Confucian philosophy of Mencius (孟⼦) can provide resources for thinking through the ethics of responsibility; and how the classical Chinese philosopher Mozi (墨⼦) can help us to overcome a tension between Divine Command Theory and the consequentialism that troubles the moral philosophy of Western scholars such as George Berkeley.

 

Program

16:00–16:05

Opening Remarks

Nakajima Takahiro (UTokyo, EAA)

 

16:05–16:40

“Maruyama Masao’s Fukuzawa Yukichi, Takeuchi Yoshimi’s Lu Xun”

Tatebe Ryōhei (UTokyo, EAA)

 

16:40–17:15

“Exploring the Thought of Filial Piety in Japan: Its Acceptance and Development in Pre-modern Times”

Uno Mizuki (UTokyo, EAA)

 

17:15–17:30

Break

 

17:30–18:05

“Mencian Philosophy of Co-action as Compatibilism”

Rika Dunlap (U. of Guam)

 

18:05–18:40

“Mozi’s Pantheism and Berkeley’s Theism: Dissolving (Or Not) the Tension between Consequentialism and Divine Command Theory”

Michael Hemmingsen (U. of Guam)

 

18:40–19:10

Discussion

 

19:10-19:15

Closing Remarks

 

Sponsored by: East Asian Academy for New Liberal Arts (EAA), the University of Tokyo.

Contact Info: 

M. Roberts, EAA

Contact Email: