Virtual Event: Animals, Ethics, and the Climate Crisis

Joey Tuminello's picture

Dear H-Environment Members,

Please see the message below regarding a webinar on food, animal, and environmental ethics taking place April 17. For those of you looking for an Earth Day-related online activity for yourself or your students, please consider signing up and forwarding this message to anyone who might be interested in joining. You can also find more information on the event here

Please reply off-list with any questions. Thanks for your time, and I hope to see you there!

Best,

Joey Tuminello

Assistant Professor of Philosophy

Department of Social Sciences

McNeese State University

Program Coordinator // Farm Forward

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On Friday, April 17, you’re invited to  join theologian David Clough to discuss animal ethics, the environmental impacts of factory farming, Christian responses to these issues, as well as information on the DefaultVeg campaign. Sign up now to participate in the Animals, Ethics, and the Climate Crisis Virtual Visit. Limited space is available for this complimentary program.

Dr. Clough is Professor of Theological Ethics at the University of Chester, UK, Visiting Professor at the Centre for Animal Welfare at the University of Winchester, past President of the Society for the Study of Christian Ethics, and founder of CreatureKind, which engages UK and North American Christian churches and institutions with farmed animal welfare as a faith issue. Dr. Clough also recently created the DefaultVeg campaign. DefaultVeg is a tangible and effective way to implement food policy that can help universities make the shift toward sustainable food choices. The idea is simple: Offer plant-based meals by default, while providing diners the choice to add meat and/or dairy products upon request. Institutions that have adopted DefaultVeg report that it’s easy to implement, saves money, and has a large, measurable climate impact, all while retaining diners’ freedom of choice. DefaultVeg also helps diners with allergies or restrictions (lactose intolerance, vegetarian, vegan, etc.) feel more included in their dining environment. DefaultVeg can be implemented anywhere food is served—such as in faculty meetings, catered events, cafés, all-you-can-eat dining facilities and anywhere else food is served on campus.

On Friday, April 17 David Clough will host four webinar sessions as part of Farm Forward’s Virtual Visits series. All are welcome to join, and this event is ideal for classes and groups related to food, animal, and environmental ethics, as well as religious studies and Christian theology. Students and others are welcome to attend individually from their home devices. In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, we hope that this provides an enriching distance learning opportunity for those who wish to take part. See further details below.

Please consider passing this email on, and don’t hesitate to contact me with further questions at josepht@farmforward.com.

Sincerely,

Joey Tuminello

Assistant Professor of Philosophy

Department of Social Sciences

McNeese State University

Program Coordinator // Farm Forward

 

Additional Information

On the day of the event, there will be 4 sessions to choose from.  Each session will consist of a 20-minute presentation by David Clough, followed by a 15-minute Q&A session. While multiple participants will be included in each time slot, there is limited space and high demand is anticipated. With this in mind, we encourage all interested parties to reserve your spot in this event as soon as possible.

Schedule of Sessions (U.S. Eastern Time)

●  Friday, April 17, 2020:

○   Session 1 - 12:00pm - 12:35pm

○   Session 2 - 12:45pm - 1:20pm

○   Session 3 - 1:30pm - 2:05pm

○   Session 4 - 2:15pm - 2:50pm

 Farm Forward is a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit organization which implements innovative strategies to promote conscientious food choices, reduce farmed animal suffering, and advance sustainable agriculture.

CreatureKind's mission is to encourage Christians to recognize faith-based reasons for caring about the wellbeing of fellow animal creatures used for food, and to take practical action in response.