REMINDER: ASEH panel, CFP: Implementing US Environmental Law, 1970 to the Present

Karen Hoffman's picture

 

Dear List members,

This is a reminder about the ASEH 2015 panel described below. If you are interested in participating in the panel, as a presenter or a commentator, please be in touch with me by July 11, 2014. Thanks!

Best,

Karen

 

Karen Hoffman

Assistant Professor

Department of Sociology and Anthropology

University of Puerto Rico

Río Piedras Campus

San Juan, Puerto Rico  00931

 

Implementing US Environmental Law, 1970 to the Present

The process of turning protest into policy has multiple moments,
aspects, and phases. This panel is focused on the making of policies
under environmental laws, in the US between 1970 and the present. The
diverse suite of environmental laws that US lawmakers created in the
1970s reflected a new seriousness about environmental protection, and
a commitment to making the implementation process more democratic and effective. For example, the requirement of government agencies to
allow public participation and the provision for citizen suits in
post-1970 environmental law for the first time allowed members of the
public other than the entities to be regulated to participate in
rulemaking and to bring legal challenges. The panel focuses on what
this new commitment to environmental protection and democracy in
policy making looked like in practice, and what have been its
outcomes. Papers are invited that address this topic. Papers may address any post-1970 environmental law in the US, at any level of government. Questions that papers address might include:

How was the law implemented?

What new participants entered into the process? What did they do? With
what effect? What limits did they encounter, if any? How were those
limits constructed?

What previous participants remained engaged in the process? What did
they do and with what effect? What limits did they encounter, if any?
How were those limits constructed?

What relationships did environmental advocates and policy makers form
with each other?

How were relationships between the private sector entities to be
regulated and policy makers reproduced and/or transformed?

How did the staff of regulatory agencies negotiate the conflicts they
found in their agencies, and/or between the private sector entities to
be regulated and public-interest advocates?

How did particular language in the law open up or constrain options in
implementation?

Were the regulatory agencies able implement the requirements in the
law? If so, how? If not, what limits did they encounter? How were
those limits constructed?

Interested panelists should submit their abstracts (of no more than
300 words), paper title, keywords, and contact information to Karen
Hoffman (karenhoffm@gmail.com) by Friday, July 11, 2014. Those
interested in participating in the commentator role should express
their interest by the same date.