The Idealis, a new open access overlay journal of scholarly communications

Book Channel readers interested in scholarly communications may want to take a look at a new initiative to highlight high-quality library and information science research, particularly open access research, on the open access overlay journal The Idealis (theidealis.org).

From the Web: Using Historical Fiction to Connect Past and Present

From the Web: Using Historical Fiction to Connect Past and Present

Anna Diamond’s article in The Atlantic discusses the use of historical fiction by primary and secondary school teachers to help teach history. Proponents argue that using such texts can help make the past come alive for students and provide students with a narrative they can relate to while also encouraging empathy. The article did caution overly enthusiastic supporters stating:

From the Web: Monograph Output of University Presses 2009-2013

From the Web: Monograph Output of University Presses 2009-2013

Inside Higher Ed and The Scholarly Kitchen recently reported on a study that suggested there may be a decline in the number of humanities monographs published by university presses. Inside Higher Ed's article notes that if this decline is part of a larger trend it may increase concerns that some presses may need to scale back publications or close production completely. The change in the output of monographs could also affect tenure and promotion decisions,

From the Web: A History of Race and Racism in America, in 24 Chapters

From the Web: A History of Race and Racism in America, in 24 Chapters

History professor Ibram X. Kendi's essay in the New York Times Book Review highlights works on race and the black experience in his selection of influential books from every decade since the founding of the United States. Kendi writes,

From the Web: The Vitae Bookshelf: Peggy Delmas

From the Web: The Vitae Bookshelf: Peggy Delmas

Vitae's virtual bookshelf invites scholars to discuss five books that influenced them. This week Peggy Delmas, a researcher of leadership and teacher education at the University of South Alabama, shared her top five books focused on the intersection of gender and leadership. She writes.

“For me, the following five books represent the most reflective and soul-searching works out there on the topic of being-both singly and in combination- a woman and a leader.”

From the Web: University Press Publishing Under an Autocracy

Guest writing for the Scholarly Kitchen, Tony Sanfilippo considers the rapidly changing landscape confronting academic presses. Sanfilippo contemplates the role of peer-review, explores trade book lists, and ruminates on the role of local bookstores.

But now I’m wondering if the disappearance of those community book sanctuaries and the salons and discussions they promoted isn’t yet another factor in creating a citizenry that can’t tell fact from fiction, the truth from a lie.

From the Web: Kathleen Fitzpatrick: The Future of Academic Style: Why Citations Still Matter in the Age of Google

In an essay posted on the Los Angeles Review of Books, Kathleen Fitzpatrick, Director of Scholarly Communication of the Modern Language Association (MLA), considers the future of  citations, particularly in an era where online content is increasingly driving academic research and composition.

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