Ancient Farming

Ancient Farming


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----------------------------Original message---------------------------- Could anyone tell me where to look for a good account of ancient indigenous crops and introduction of new plants into areas colonized by the Greeks and Romans? I got thinking about this topic because of the interesting exchanges on the introduction of the potato into New England, and the earlier discussion on this list of exchanges of crops and technique between native Americans and settlers

Any help will be greatly appreciated!

--Jeri Fogel

16 Dec 1994

        John Hannum <JHANN00@ukcc.uky.edu>                                      
     Re: ancient farming                                                        

Jerise Fogel said: >Could anyone tell me where to look for a good account of ancient indigenous >crops and introduction of new plants into areas colonized by the Greeks and

As this is sort of some of what I do on the introduction of crops into Africa I can give you some hints of searching LOC: Topics are: Phytogeography; Plants -- migration; Agriculture -- origin; vegetation boundaries. Among many others, I'm sure.

I'm sure there are some librarians out there who can offer more.

John Hannum University of Kentucky Co0moderator this list and RURSOC-L


         19 Dec 1994                                                            
From:         Alexander Ingle <aingle@acs.bu.edu>                               
Subject:      Re: ancient farming                                               

All things Roman agricultural begin with K. D. White's *Roman Farming,* Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1970. For corrections to White and a better grip on the ethno-botany of it all, look at M. S. Spurr's *Arable Cultivation in Italy* (or close). On the Greek side there's a 1993 *Ancient Greek Agriculture* by a couple of Danes that's worthy. For a more structural approach to the economic aspects of the Roman Agriculture (also in the Greek part of the Roman empire, try Richard Duncan-Jones' *The Economy of the Roman Empire. Quantitative Studies, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990. The basic reference work is Tenny Frank's *An Economic Survey of Ancient Rome,* Baltimore: the Johns Hopkins University Press, 1940. A very good case study is W. Jashemski's *The Gardens of Pompeii,* New Rochelle: Caratazas Brothers, 1979. Very much the on plant remains.

Sorry this is heavy on the Roman side. There is a new book by Alison Burford on Greek agriculture that I haven't read, but she's first-rate on everything.

Happy holidays to everyone!

Alex Ingle aingle@acs.bu.edu


19 Dec 1994

From:         Earl M Rogers 319/335-5921                                        
              <EROGERTS%UIAMVS.bitnet@CUNYVM.CUNY.EDU>                          
Subject:      Ancient farming                                                   

----------------------------Original message---------------------------- Another work, in which the author may disprove contentions of earlier writers, is: Robert Sallares. The ecology of the ancient Greek world. London: Duckworth; Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1991. 588 p. Ch. 3, Agriculture, p. 294- 389, 472-500.


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Posted: 17 Jul 1995

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