ANN: “Rights and Wrongs: A Constitution and Citizenship Day Conference at San Francisco State University” – 18-19 September 2017

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“Rights and Wrongs: A Constitution and Citizenship Day Conference at San Francisco State University” – 18-19 September 2017

 

Monday, 18 September

9:30-10:45a.m

Session 1 (Library 244)

Transnational Perspectives on U.S. History and the U.S. Constitution

Chair: Jessica Breiteneicher Elkind (SFSU History Department)

Bill Issel, “Promoting Human Rights by Transnational Collaboration: The Anglo-American U.S. History Project, 1976-1986” (SFSU History Department)

Kym Morrison “Contradictions of the Republics' Essential Outsiders: Blacks and Indians in the Cuban and U.S. Constitutions” (SFSU History Department)

 

Session 2 (Library 121)

Constitutional Flaws and Futures

Chair: Steve Harris (SFSU History Department)

Cristina Pineda, “The Role of the 4th and 13th Amendments in Upholding the Carceral State” (Southwestern Law School)

Jared Crum, “A National Direct Democracy Amendment: The Promise and Peril of a Majoritarian Constitution” (Stanford University Law School)

Ariel Andrew, “WWGWD (What Would George Washington Do?): Rewriting the Patriarchal Popular Rhetoric of Constitutional Narrative” (San Jose State University Creative Writing Department)

Kurt Nutting, “Title TBA: Voting Rights” (SFSU Philosophy Department)

 

11:00a.m.-12:15p.m.

Session 3:

Universities as Sites of Politics and Policing (Jack Adams Hall, Cesar Chavez Student Center)

Chair: Mali Kigasari (SFSU Paralegal Studies Program)

Sunaina Maira, “Academic Repression and Solidarities: Policing (and Resisting) the Neoliberal University (University of California, Davis, Asian American Studies Department)

Ofelia Cuevas, “Race and the L.A. Human” (University of California, Davis, Chicana/o Studies Department)

Janet Boulware and Natalia Deeb-Sossa, “‘We Are Not A Token’: Chicanx/Latinx Undergraduate Studies as Cultural Citizens at the University of California at Davis” (University of California, Davis, Geography Department and Chicana/o Studies Department)

Saleem Shehadeh, “Policing Advocates for Justice: Campus Control and the Shifting Use of Time, Place and Manner” (University of California, Los Angeles, Anthropology Department)

 

Session 4:

Immigration Exclusion, Incarceration, and Experience: Past, Present, and Future (Library 121)

Chair: Christen Sasaki (SFSU Asian American Studies Department)

Koji Ozawa, “The Vulnerability of Non-Citizens: Issei and Incarceration during World War II” (Stanford University Department of Anthropology)

Anna Eng, “Immigration and Exclusion: The Experiences of Undocumented Immigrants, Then and Now” (SFSU Women and Gender Studies Department)

 

12:30-1:50p.m.

Session 5 (Library 121)

Witness to Guantanamo: Guantanamo and the Constitution after 9/11

This session features video clips excerpted from the Witness to Guantanamo Project and comments by Peter Jan Honigsberg, University of San Francisco School of Law, and Johnny Symons, SFSU School of Cinema

 

Session 6 (Jack Adams Hall, Cesar Chavez Student Center)

Academic Freedom for Whom? Islamophobia, Palestine, and Campus Politics, Part One

Chair: Rabab Abdulhadi (SFSU Arab and Muslim Ethnicities and Diasporas Studies)

James Martel, “The Weaponization of Free Speech: Liberal Rights and Political Decisions (SFSU Political Science Department)

Liz Jackson, “Lawfare and the Palestine Exception to Free Speech” (Palestine Legal)

Blanca Misse, “Academic Freedom and the Danger Zones of Free Speech” (SFSU French Department)

Vida Samiian, “The Edward Said Search at CSU-Fresno: Implications for Campus Academic Freedom” (California State University, Fresno, Linguistics Department)

Tallie Ben Daniel, Coordinator, Academic Advisory Council, Jewish Voice for Peace

Saleem Shehadeh, “Peddling Injustice: Neoliberal Diversity and the Art of Erasure” (University of California, Los Angeles, Anthropology and Middle East Studies)

 

2:10-3:40p.m.

Session 7 (Library 121)

Trump and the Constitution: A Roundtable

Moderator: Martin Carcieri, SFSU Political Science Department

David DeGroot, “Trump and the Constitution: A Lawyer’s Perspective” (San Francisco Federalist Society)

Martin Carcieri, “Justice Gorsuch and the Right to Die: A Rawlsian Critique” (SFSU Political Science Department)

Charles Postel, “Trump and the Constitution: A Transatlantic Perspective” (SFSU History Department)

Natasha Dao, “Hobby Lobby and LGBTQ Rights” (SFSU Political Science Department)

 

Session 8 (Jack Adams Hall, Cesar Chavez Student Center)

Muslims, Mexicans, and the Politics of Exclusion, Part One

Chairs: Rabab Abdulhadi (SFSU Arab and Muslim Ethnicities and Diasporas Studies) and Cesar (Che) Rodriguez (SFSU Criminal Justice Studies)

Yousef Baker (California State University, Long Beach, International Studies Program)

Natalia Deeb-Sossa (University of California, Davis, Chicana/o Studies Department)

Sahar Sadeghi (Muhlenberg College Department of Sociology)

Daniel Olmos (University of Denver Interdisciplinary Research Incubator for the Study of (In)Equality)

Steven Osuna (California State University, Long Beach, Sociology Department).

Nina Farnia (University of California-Davis, History Department)

 

Session 9 (Library 244)

Responses to Violence: Education, Prevention, and Advocacy

Chair: Eva Sheppard Wolf (SFSU History Department)

Irma Garcia and Lisa Parham, “American Rape Culture in Education during the Age of Trump” (San Jose State University English Department)

Melissa Barthelemy, “Disarming Hate: Gun Violence Prevention Efforts and the 2nd Amendment” (University of California, Santa Barbara, History Department)

Amy Casselman Hontalas, “The Violence Against Women Act and the Trope of ‘Unconstitutionality’” (SFSU American Indian Studies)

 

4:00-5:30p.m.

Session 10

Keynote Presentation (Jack Adams Hall, Cesar Chavez Student Center)

Chair: Marc Stein (SFSU History Department)

Welcome: Andrew T. Harris (Dean, SFSU College of Liberal and Creative Arts)

Robin D. G. Kelley - “Crimes of Liberty: The Origins of the Constitution and the Unfinished Business of Abolition”

Biography: Robin D. G. Kelley is the Gary B. Nash Professor of American History at the University of California, Los Angeles; he taught previously at the University of Southern California, Columbia University, New York University, and the University of Michigan. His award-winning books include Hammer and Hoe: Alabama Communists During the Great Depression (1990), Race Rebels: Culture, Politics, and the Black Working Class (1994), Yo’ Mama’s DisFunktional!: Fighting the Culture Wars in Urban America (1997), Freedom Dreams: The Black Radical Imagination (2002), Thelonious Monk: The Life and Times of an American Original (2009), and Africa Speaks, America Answers: Modern Jazz in Revolutionary Times (2012). 

 

Tuesday, 19 September

9:30-10:45a.m.

Session 11 (Library 460)

Victor Arnautoff and Cultural Politics during the Cold War

This session features an introduction to an exhibit at the SFSU Special Collections Gallery by Robert Cherny, SFSU History Department, and Catherine Powell, SFSU Labor Archives Research Center

 

Session 12 (Jack Adams Hall, Cesar Chavez Student Center)

Queer Exclusions and the 40th Anniversary of Boutilier v. Immigration and Naturalization Service (1967)

Chair: Darius Bost (SFSU Sociology and Sexuality Studies Department)

Marc Stein, “Intersectional Perspectives on Boutilier v. INS” (SFSU History Department)

Amy Sueyoshi, “Desperate Acts during Desperate Times: The Truth about Immigration” (SFSU College of Ethnic Studies)

 

11:00a.m.-12:15p.m.

Session 13 (Library 121)

Mexican Removals and New Mexican Revolts

Chair: Teresa Carrillo (SFSU Latina/Latino Studies Department)

Marla A. Ramírez, “Multiple Waves of Removals: Rethinking the Mexican Repatriation Program” (SFSU Sociology and Sexuality Studies Department)

Paco Martin del Campo, “Revoltos Neomejicanos: Miners’ Unions, the Empire Zinc Strike, and the Fall of Labor in the Southwest, 1933-1952” (University of California, Berkeley, History Department)

 

Session 14 (Jack Adams Hall, Cesar Chavez Student Center)

From the Briggs Initiative to the FAIR Act: LGBT Educators and Education in California

Chair: Sue Englander, SFSU History Department

Tom Ammiano, “‘Save Our Children?’: The Moral Majority vs. LGBT Teachers in the Campaign against the Briggs Initiative” (San Francisco Board of Supervisors, 1994-2008, and California State Assembly, 2008-2014)

Gwenn Craig, “Defeating Proposition 6: Lessons Learned from Grassroots Campaign Strategies and Community Engagement” (San Franciscans Against Proposition 6, 1978, San Francisco Police Commissioner, 1987-1992)

 

12:30p.m.-1:50p.m.

Session 15 (Jack Adams Hall, Cesar Chavez Student Center)

Academic Freedom for Whom? Islamophobia, Palestine, and Campus Politics, Part Two

Chair: Saleem Shehadeh (University of California, Los Angeles, Departments of Anthropology and Middle East Studies)

Rabab Abdulhadi, “It’s Also Islamophobic: Israel Lobby’s Attacks against Palestinian Pedagogy and Scholarship” (SFSU Arab and Muslim Ethnicities and Diasporas Studies)

Diana Block, “No Sanctuary for Palestine Scholarship at SFSU” (Palestine Prisoner, Academic, and Labor Solidarity Delegation)

Terry Collins and Nesbit Crutchfield, “From Third World Studies to AMED Studies: Teaching Justice at SFSU” (Representatives of 1968-69 SFSU Strike)

Sara Kershnar, “The Business of Backlash: The Political Economy of the Pro-Israel Network” (International Jewish Anti-Zionist Network)

Susan Greene, “Wither Social Justice @ SFSU: Dissent, Activism, and the Pedagogy of Art” (SFSU Palestinian Cultural Mural)

 

Session 16 (Library 121)

Disability, Health, Labor, and Citizenship: Fierce or Fraught Alliances?

Chair: Catherine Kudlick (SFSU Longmore Institute on Disability)

Grace Chang, “Inevitable Intersections: Care, Work and Citizenship” (University of California, Santa Barbara, Feminist Studies Department)

Mimi Khúc, “Mad Minorities: Mental Health as Racialized, Capitalist Citizenship” (University of Maryland Asian American Studies Department)

Karah Newton, “Ain’t I a Woman Campaign?!: Lessons from the Front Line of Home Care Workers Organizing” (Texas A&M University Department of Landscape Architecture and Urban Planning)

 

2:10-3:40p.m.

Session 17 (Jack Adams Hall, Cesar Chavez Student Center)

Muslims, Mexicans, and the Politics of Exclusion, Part Two

Chairs: Rabab Abdulhadi (SFSU Arab and Muslim Ethnicities and Diasporas Studies) and Cesar (Che) Rodriguez (SFSU Criminal Justice Studies)

Hatem Bazian (University of California, Berkeley, Islamophobia Research and Documentation Project)

            Blanca Misse (SFSU Department of Modern Languages and Literatures)

            Rev. Michael Yoshii (Buena Vista United Methodist Church in Alameda)

            Mira Nabulsi (SFSU Communications Department)

            Amrah Salomon (University of California, San Diego, Ethnic Studies Department)

            Nanea Renteria (SFSU Race and Resistance Studies)

 

Session 18 (Library 121)

Re-coding Our Founding Documents: Video Explorations on Free Speech

This session features documentaries from the Documentary Film Institute project on the U.S. Constitution and comments by Soumyaa Behrens, SFSU Documentary Film Institute, and additional panelists.

 

4:00-5:30p.m.

Session 19

Keynote Presentation (Jack Adams Hall, Cesar Chavez Student Center)

Chair: Marc Stein (SFSU History Department)

Welcome: Jennifer Summit (Provost, San Francisco State University)

Shirin Sinnar – “What Good are Courts?:  Travel Bans, National Security, and the Mixed Promise of the Law”

 

Biography: Shirin Sinnar is an associate professor of law and the John A. Wilson Distinguished Faculty Scholar at Stanford Law School. She writes on the role of institutions, including courts and executive branch agencies, in protecting individual rights and democratic values in the national security context, and on the impact of counterterrorism policies on U.S. minority and immigrant communities. Her articles have been published in the Harvard Law Review, Stanford Law Review, Georgetown Law Journal, Harvard Civil Rights-Civil Liberties Law Review, and other journals. Prior to joining academia, she worked for five years as a civil rights lawyer with the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights of San Francisco and the Asian Law Caucus.

 

Conference Organizing Committee:

Conference Coordinator: Marc Stein, History Department

Rabab Ibrahim Abdulhadi, Arab and Muslim Ethnicities and Diasporas Studies

Martin Carcieri, Political Science Department

Teresa Carrillo, Latina/Latino Studies Department

Deb Cohler, Women and Gender Studies Department

Brad Fogo, College of Education

Steve Harris, History Department

Mali Kigasari, Paralegal Studies Program

Catherine Kudlick, History Department and Paul K. Longmore Institute on Disability

Catherine Powell, Labor Archives and Research Center

Marla Ramírez, Sociology and Sexuality Studies Department

Belinda Reyes, Cesar E. Chavez Institute

César "Ché" Rodríguez, Criminal Justice Studies Department

Christen Sasaki, Asian American Studies Department

Johnny Symons, School of Cinema

 

Sponsor: College of Liberal and Creative Arts

Co-sponsors: College of Ethnic Studies, College of Extended Learning, Division of Graduate Studies, History Department, History Students Association, Labor Archives and Research Center, Longmore Institute on Disability, Pasker Chair in History, Political Science Department, School of Public Affairs and Civic Engagement, Sociology and Sexuality Studies Department, Women and Gender Studies Department

 

Conference Website: https://history.sfsu.edu/content/constitution-day

 

Marc Stein

Jamie and Phyllis Pasker Professor of History

San Francisco State University

marcs@sfsu.edu