Tribal Justice: Tribal Court Documentary

Sabine Frid's picture

Hi! I am excited to share about this documentary I have been on the backend of for some time now, which I think would be of interest to people in the network. 

Tribal Justice is a documentary feature about a little known, underreported but effective criminal justice reform movement in America: the efforts of tribal courts to create alternative systems of justice. There are more than 300 tribal courts across the country. In California, two formidable women lead the way. Abby Abinanti, Chief Judge of the Yurok Tribe on the north coast, and Claudette White, Chief Judge of the Quechan Tribe in the southern desert, are creating innovative systems that focus on restoring rather than punishing offenders in order to keep tribal members out of prison, prevent children from being taken from their communities, and stop theschool-to-prison pipeline that plagues their young people.

These two Native American judges reach back to traditional concepts of justice in order to reduce incarceration rates, foster greater safety for their communities, and create a more positive future for their youth. By addressing the root causes of crime, they are providing models of restorative justice that are working. Mainstream courts across the country are taking notice.

The tribal courts both incorporate traditional values and hold up an example to the nation about the possibilities of alternative dispute resolution. [They] have much to offer to the tribal communities, and much to teach the other court systems operating in the United States.

     — The Honorable Sandra Day O’Connor, former Supreme Court Justice

For more information about the film and upcoming screenings: 

http://www.makepeaceproductions.com/tribaljustice/

To purchase the film: 

http://makepeaceproductions.com/buy-tribaljustice.html