Discussions

Hodson Trust - John Carter Brown Fellowship (four months, $20,000 + housing)

The Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience and the John Carter Brown Library invite applications for the Hodson Trust - John Carter Brown Fellowship, a unique research and writing fellowship. The Hodson Trust - John Carter Brown Fellowship supports work by academics, independent scholars and writers working on significant projects relating to the literature, history, culture, or art of the Americas before 1830. Candidates with a U.S.

Thursday, December 2: A Conversation with Tommy Orange

Final OHMA Fall Workshop: A Conversation with Tommy Orange

Thursday, December 2, 7:00-8:30pm. 

Register here.

Award-winning Cheyenne-Arapaho novelist Tommy Orange will discuss the role of oral history, documentary, and storytelling in There There as well as his novel-in-progress on Indian Boarding Schools.

Call for Applications: 2022-2023 Research Fellowships for PhD Candidates, USC Dornsife Center for Advanced Genocide Research

Call for Applications for PhD Candidates
2022-2023

Deadline: February 15, 2022

The USC Dornsife Center for Advanced Genocide Research invites proposals for its three research fellowships for advanced-standing PhD candidates: the 2022-2023 Margee and Douglas Greenberg Research Fellowship; the 2022-2023 Robert J. Katz Research Fellowship in Genocide Studies; and the 2022-2023 Breslauer, Rutman, and Anderson Research Fellowship.

Mastering Oral History:A Concise Guide

Mastering Oral History:A Concise Guide

International Workshop

There will be two groups (same workshop, different time)
Group 1:   11:oo am Amsterdam time (+UTC 2) for participants from Europe, Africa, Asia & Australia
Group 2:   19.00 pm Amsterdam time (+UTC 2) for participants from the American continent
Find your timezone here

Copyright Release of Rights Obligations for 1970s Interviews

My university has acquired a collection of recordings of interviews conducted with elderly, Black residents of Pontiac, Michigan in the mid-1970s. There are no copyright release of rights forms, which is understandable since that was not yet an expectation or requirement when doing oral history. We're looking for advice about what to do so that scholars, students, and community members can use these interviews. It is extremely doubtful that any of the narrators are still living.

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