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CFP: New Perspectives in Environmental History, Yale University


CALL FOR PAPERS
"NEW PERSPECTIVES IN ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY"
A Northeast Regional Conference 
Saturday, April 14, 2018    
Kroon Hall, Yale University
New Haven, Connecticut
** Paper Abstract Submission Deadline: December 8, 2017 **
http://environmentalhistory.yale.edu
environmentalhistory@yale.edu
 

British Animal Studies Network cfp

Dear Friends

I am pleased to announce that the cfp for 'Sex', the first 2018 meeting of the British Animal Studies Network, has now been issued. The meeting will take place at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow on 27 and 28 April 2018, and confirmed plenary speakers are: Andy Butterworth (Animal Science and Policy, Bristol University), Stella Sandford (Philosophy, Kingston University), and Karl Steel (Medieval Studies, Brooklyn College, CUNY). The BASN poet-in-residence, Susan Richardson will also be giving a performance.

Announcement: New PhD Program in Human-Animal Studies at the University of Canterbury

Message from the New Zealand Centre for Human-Animal Studies
 
Kia ora koutou katoa, hi everyone:
 
From January 2018, the University of Canterbury will be offering a PhD in Human-Animal Studies. This is the first such degree offered in the Southern Hemisphere, and one of only three or four throughout the world.
 
http://www.nzchas.canterbury.ac.nz/courses/phdhuan.shtml
 

CfP: The Animal in Medieval Romance, at the 53rd International Congress on Medieval Studies (2018)

Call for Papers: The Animal in Medieval Romance, at the 53rd International Congress on Medieval Studies at Kalamazoo (2018)
 
The 'animal turn' is one of the newest and most exciting developments in medieval scholarship.

CFP - Edited Collection - Equine Breeds

In 1565 Thomas Blundeville mused that since ‘it is naturally given to every beast for the moste parte to engender hys lyke, as well as conditions as in shape of body, it is very requisite therefore for him that would have a good race, to be very circumspect in choosing the first stallions and mares from whom he would have his race decend, to the intent he may reape thereof both pleasure and profit, and not bestow his cost and labour in vain.’[1] According to Blundeville, breeders and horses both wish to perpetuate a lineage,

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