Virtual conference: 'Between Self and State: Exile in the Early Modern World', University of Cambridge, 24-25 March 2021

Duncan Hardy's picture

Virtual conference: 'Between Self and State: Exile in the Early
Modern World', University of Cambridge, 24-25 March 2021.

This two-day interdisciplinary conferences bring together researchers
on early modern exile.

The early modern period (c. 1500-1800) was an age marked by the
displacement and forced migration of social groups and individuals
around the world. In recent decades, scholars have paid closer
attention to migration and mobility to examine how movement in space
and transnational connections affected early modern lives. Exile,
however, remains a neglected part of this story. This conference aims
to present research on early modern exile to highlight not just human
movement in general, but particularly those features that set exile
apart from other forms of migration.

The coerced relocation of political and religious exiles during this
period transformed both the places in which they sought refuge and the
countries they left behind. The exilic experience could foster forms
of cosmopolitanism and tolerance, but also cultures of mistrust, as
exiles found their loyalties interrogated in both their former
countries and their new homes. These tensions worked to reshape
regional, national, political, and religious identifications, while
calling into question notions of individual identity and selfhood.
These broad considerations give rise to the twin themes of our
conference: self and state.

The conference features keynote lectures from Professor Peter Burke
and Professor Juliette Cherbuliez.

For the programme and to register (deadline: 19 March), please visit:
https://selfandstate21.wordpress.com