CFP: Borders that Bind: Boundedness and Interconnectivity in the Later Medieval Holy Roman Empire

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Borders that Bind: Boundedness and Interconnectivity in the Later Medieval Holy Roman Empire

 

The  Holy  Roman  Empire  of   the  later  Middle  Ages  witnessed  a proliferation  of   borders  and  boundaries,  as  delimited  and  sometimes enclosed  communities  and  institutions  combined  and  coexisted  with highly  decentralized  and  fragmented  political  authority.  But  many of  these  boundaries  went  hand-in-hand  with  intensified  ‘cross-border’ connections:   political   fragmentation   necessitated   cooperation   and mutual aid, and more ‘bounded’ communities were often part of  more developed  networks.  These  sessions  aim  to  explore  any  aspect  of   or approach   to   this   dynamic   relationship   between   boundedness   and interconnectivity  throughout  the  Empire  between  the  thirteenth  and the early sixteenth centuries.

 

Possible topics could include:

  • Territories and lordships
  • Towns and villages
  • Religious communities
  • Parishes and wards or quarters
  • Guilds, fraternities and societies
  • Nations and linguistic groups
  • Social stratification and hierarchy
  • Centres and peripheries

Please send short abstracts (100–200 words) to benjamin.pope@manchester.ac.uk by 20 September at the latest.

 

Organizers: Duncan Hardy (Central Florida, USA), Ben Pope (Manchester, UK), Lisa Rolston (Canterbury, Christchurch, NZ)