Summer issue of NJ Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal now available

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The summer issue of NJ Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal is now live! As always, NJ Studies is free and open to all. Thank you to all of our authors and peer reviewers, our editorial board, and all others who helped bring this issue to fruition! Click here to access: New Jersey Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal (rutgers.edu)

In this issue:

“Jesus and the Bulldozer: Religion, Suburbanization, and Urban Renewal in a New Jersey Camp Meeting Community,” by Samuel Avery-Quinn of Appalachian State University

“Industrial Waste from the Whitney Glass Works, Circa 1900: The Approaching End of Mouth-Blown Hollowware at Glassboro,” by Michael Bernstein, independent scholar

“‘Turbulent tymes’ in a New Colony: Philip Carteret’s Letter to the Proprietors, August 3, 1666,” by Timothy Crist of the Newark Public Library

“The Archaeology of Morris Cohen: A Jewish Farmer’s Victory over a Groundhog in Nineteenth-Century Green Brook, New Jersey,” by Adam Heinrich of the Monmouth University - Department of History and Anthropology

“New Jersey Online: Affective Histories in Newark’s Digital Archives,” by Shannon Mooney from the University of Massachusetts

“Photographers of the Civil War Era: Frank H. Price of Elizabeth and Newark,” by Gary Saretzky with Joseph Bilby of the National Guard Militia Museum of New Jersey

“William S. Bucklin and George P. Bartle: Accomplished Artists of Phalanx, New Jersey,” by Joseph Hammond, former longtime curator of the Monmouth County Historical Association

“The Letter from Mickle Swamp: John James Audubon, South Jersey, and Birds of America Plate 81: Fish Hawk or Osprey,” by Nicholas Ciotola of the New Jersey State Museum

“Teaching the Pandemic in the Social Studies Classroom,” by William Gorman of the Monmouth University - Department of History and Anthropology

“Portrait of Place: Paintings, Drawings, and Prints of New Jersey, 1761–1898,” a review of the exhibit at Morven Museum & Garden by Kelly Morgan