PD Opportunity: Gilder Lehrman Teacher Seminars in US History

Joseph J. Ferreira, Jr.'s picture

2018 Teacher Seminars

 

The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History offers rigorous Teacher Seminars for K–12 educators. Held at colleges and historic sites across the US and abroad, the weeklong workshops include daily programs with leading American historians, visits to local historic sites, and hands-on work with primary sources.

These highly competitive seminars are open exclusively to participants in the Institute’s free Affiliate School Program. Check here to see if your school is in the Affiliate School Program. If it is not, register now to ensure that you will be eligible to apply for the Teacher Seminars. We welcome applications from previous Teacher Seminar attendees as well as new participants.

JUNE 17 - JUNE 23

Everyday Life in Colonial America, June 17–23, 2018

JOHN DEMOSLOCATION: YALE UNIVERSITY

Participants will explore central themes and questions relating to everyday life during the colonial period of American history (roughly 1600–1775). The goal is to develop a detailed sense of life on the ground among ordinary folk in this time and place, and the history that remains evident in the natural and built landscape. LEARN MORE »

The American Civil War: Origins and Consequences, June 17–June 23, 2018

GARY W. GALLAGHERLOCATION: UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA

Explore the key topics of the Civil War, including the central role of slavery, how military and civilian affairs intersected, and how Americans have remembered the conflict. LEARN MORE »

America in the Age of Discovery: 1492–1625, June 17–23, 2018

PETER MANCALLLOCATION: UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIAIN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

Explore the initial creation of “America,” with a particular focus on the period from European contact through the establishment of permanent colonies in English North America.LEARN MORE »

JUNE 24 - JUNE 30

The Life and Writings of Frederick Douglass, June 24–30, 2018

DAVID BLIGHTLOCATION: YALE UNIVERSITY

Assess the complex life and legacy of Frederick Douglass (1818–1895) as activist, artist, and thinker through both his public and his private life and through his writings. LEARN MORE »

Lincoln Speaks: Words That Transformed a Nation, June 24–30, 2018

MICHAEL BURLINGAMELOCATION: ABRAHAM LINCOLN PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY AND MUSEUMIN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE ABRAHAM LINCOLN PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY AND MUSEUM

This seminar will allow participants to explore Lincoln’s life and writings in his hometown of Springfield, Illinois, where they will read and discuss his speeches and letters amid the physical context in which he grew from a twenty-two-year-old “strange, friendless, uneducated, penniless boy” (as he later described himself) to a historic statesman. LEARN MORE »

Presidents at War, June 24–30, 2018

JEFFREY ENGELLOCATION: SOUTHERN METHODIST UNIVERSITYIN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE CENTER FOR PRESIDENTIAL HISTORY, SOUTHERN METHODIST UNIVERSITY

“War is the health of the state,” Randolph Bourne suggested amidst World War I. It is certainly a sad but omnipresent aspect of modern American life, in the 20th and 21st centuries in particular, yet also a key lens through which we view and evaluate our commanders in chief. From William McKinley to Donald Trump, this course explores the way American presidents have waged war and led during wartime, and their policies at home and abroad, in order to understand better their role as leaders, and the nation’s role in the world. LEARN MORE »

The South and New Orleans in American History, June 24–30, 2018

PAMELA TYLERLOCATION: HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTIONIN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION

The distinctiveness of the American South is universally acknowledged. Although in a process John Egerton calls “the southernization of America” many southern hallmarks, products, and pastimes have found a following far beyond Dixie (country music, anyone?), the passage of time does not seem to diminish the idea that the South is really a nation within a nation. The South holds the distinction of having been both the nation’s wealthiest region and later the nation’s poorest region. This seminar will be held in partnership with the Historic New Orleans CollectionLEARN MORE »

JULY 01 - JULY 7

The Making of America: From Colonial America through the Civil War, July 1–7, 2018

DENVER BRUNSMANLOCATION: GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITYK-8 TEACHERS ONLY

This seminar, designed especially for K–8 teachers, will explore the people, ideas, and events that shaped America from the colonial era through the Civil War. Each day will focus on key primary sources and the latest historical interpretations of major historical events and periods, including the American Revolution, Constitution, Jacksonian America, and Civil War. LEARN MORE »

Thomas Jefferson and the Enlightenment, July 1–7, 2018

FRANK COGLIANOLOCATION: UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH

Examine Jefferson’s life and times by considering his efforts to apply the principles of reason to the major challenges he confronted as a revolutionary, diplomat, politician, and elder statesman.LEARN MORE »

JULY 08 - JULY 14

A Nation of Immigrants: Migration in the Making of the United States, July 8–14, 2018

MADELINE HSULOCATION: THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN

This seminar trains teachers in key topics and themes in the evolution of the United States as a nation of immigrants. All discussions will be chronologically organized while emphasizing the following strands: the changing population of the United States from colonial times to the present through free and coerced migrations, expansion, and conquest; ideologies concerning eligibility for citizenship and for restricting immigration; the development of immigration law as an aspect of sovereign authority; the entwining of immigration policy with international relations; immigration controls as enacting systematic inequalities; and the expansion of immigration enforcement authority and bureaucracies. LEARN MORE »

 

JULY 08 - JULY 14

Eisenhower and the Art of Presidential Leadership, July 8–14, 2018

MICHAEL BIRKNERLOCATION: AMERICAN UNIVERSITYIN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER MEMORIAL COMMISSION

Explore the theme of presidential leadership through an investigation of the 34th president, Dwight David Eisenhower, including his management style, use of delegation, dealings with Congress and, as Fred Greenstein styles it, his “hidden hand” approach to key issues.LEARN MORE »

Gettysburg: History and Memory, July 8–14, 2018

ALLEN C. GUELZOLOCATION: GETTYSBURG COLLEGE

Through the experiences of soldiers and civilians and an understanding of the battlefield itself, participants will come to know Gettysburg as a hinge event in the development of American democracy. LEARN MORE »

9-11 and American Memory, July 8–14, 2018

EDWARD T. LINENTHALLOCATION: NEW YORK UNIVERSITYIN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE 9/11 MEMORIAL & MUSEUM

Examine the nature and meaning of historical memory, using the extraordinary collections of the 9/11 Memorial & Museum, the historic site, and memorial itself to explore the forging of reactions to and interpretations of 9/11. LEARN MORE »

The Civil Rights Movement, July 8–14, 2018

CHARLES MCKINNEYLOCATION: RHODES COLLEGEIN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE NATIONAL CIVIL RIGHTS MUSEUM AND RHODES COLLEGE

The slogan “Black Power” represents the struggle to confront one of the central contradictions in American life—racial repression woven into the fabric of American freedom. This seminar uses Memphis, Tennessee, as a focal point to examine the historical origins of Black Power and its impact on the United States. LEARN MORE »

The American Revolution, July 8–July 14, 2018

ANDREW W. ROBERTSONLOCATION: NEW YORK UNIVERSITY

Participants will consider two different American revolutions: the struggle for American self-determination from 1763 to 1783 and the ongoing struggle for liberty and equality enunciated in the Declaration of Independence. This seminar is geared toward K–8 teachers. LEARN MORE »

Slavery and Abolition, July 8–14, 2018

MANISHA SINHALOCATION: COLUMBIA UNIVERSITYTHE LAPIDUS CENTER FOR THE HISTORICAL ANALYSIS OF TRANSATLANTIC SLAVERY

This seminar will explore the long movement to abolish slavery from the American Revolution to the Civil War. It will examine the entrenched nature of racial slavery in the nation’s political economy and what the abolitionists were up against in the slaveholding American republic. We will examine the relationship between slavery and the rise of early capitalism and slaveholders’ political dominance in the early republic, how a radical social movement like abolition managed to break the national political silence over slavery, and how slave resistance shaped the abolition movement. LEARN MORE »

JULY 15 - JULY 21

The Vietnam War, July 15–21, 2018

ROBERT BRIGHAMLOCATION: THE FIRST DIVISION MUSEUM AT CANTIGNY PARKIN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE FIRST DIVISION MUSEUM AT CANTIGNY PARK

This workshop is an examination of the origins, course, and impact of America’s involvement in Vietnam, emphasizing the evolution of American diplomacy, the formulation of military strategy, the domestic impact of the war, and the perspective of Vietnamese revolutionaries. LEARN MORE »

The United States in Depression and War, 1929-1945, July 15–21, 2018

DAVID M. KENNEDYLOCATION: STANFORD UNIVERSITY

Survey the causes and impact of the Depression, the nature of the New Deal, and the war’s formative impact on the shaping of American society. LEARN MORE »

The Kennedy Presidency, July 15–21, 2018

BARBARA PERRYLOCATION: BOSTON UNIVERSITY

Explore the successes and failures of John F. Kennedy’s presidency more than fifty years after his assassination, including the Cold War, the Peace Corps, civil rights, and the arts, through media, leadership theory, and public policy. LEARN MORE »

JULY 15 - JULY 21

The Age of Lincoln, July 15–21, 2018

RICHARD CARWARDINELOCATION: ST. CATHERINE'S COLLEGE, OXFORD UNIVERSITY

Abraham Lincoln’s life becomes a prism for exploring key aspects of his age, including slavery and the Old South, religion and politics, wartime leadership, and emancipation. LEARN MORE »

 

JULY 15 - JULY 21

American Capitalism, July 15–21, 2018

DAVID SICILIALOCATION: NEW YORK UNIVERSITY

In the decades that followed the Civil War, the United States emerged as the world’s economic powerhouse. We will explore the origins of that development and major issues of the past 150 years in economic and business history, including the role of the federal government, the response of industrial workers, the role of business between the two world wars, the causes of the Great Depression, the arc of the American economy after World War II, and the realities and mythologies of Reaganomics and the New Economy. LEARN MORE »

World War I and Its Aftermath, July 15–21, 2018

JAY WINTERLOCATION: NATIONAL WWI MUSEUM AND MEMORIALIN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE NATIONAL WWI MUSEUM AND MEMORIAL

Examine the origins, scope, and consequences of World War I, with a particular emphasis on the revolution in violence between 1914 and 1918, the obliteration of the distinction between military and civilian targets, the failed peace settlement, and the patterns of remembrance.LEARN MORE »

JULY 22 - JULY 28

The Colonial Era, July 22–28, 2018

JOHN FEALOCATION: PRINCETON UNIVERSITY

Examine how the colonies developed from remote English outposts to well-connected provinces of the British Empire and consider how this period provides a laboratory for teaching historical-thinking skills in the K–8 classroom. LEARN MORE »

Reconstruction, July 22–28, 2018

ERIC FONERLOCATION: COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

Reconstruction remains a pivotal but much misunderstood era of American history, 125 years after it came to a close. This seminar will examine the history of Reconstruction, understood both as a specific period of the American past, which began during the Civil War, and as a prolonged and difficult process by which Americans sought to reunite the nation and come to terms with the destruction of slavery. LEARN MORE »

Westward Expansion, July 22–28, 2018

PATRICIA NELSON LIMERICKLOCATION: UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO, BOULDER

Using the latest in research in “New Western History,” participants will explore case studies that explain the importance and distinctiveness of the American West in the past and present.LEARN MORE »

Our Constitution: The Bill of Rights, July 22–28, 2018

BRUCE ALLEN MURPHYLOCATION: LAFAYETTE COLLEGEIN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE RENDELL CENTER FOR CIVICS AND CIVIC ENGAGEMENT

Examine how the Founders’ vision for the Bill of Rights has been interpreted and revised by the U.S. Supreme Court. LEARN MORE »

The Global Cold War, July 22–28, 2018

DANIEL SARGENTLOCATION: USS MIDWAY MUSEUMIN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE USS MIDWAY MUSEUM

Place the Soviet-American struggle in broad historical and international contexts, with particular focus on the last years, the resolution, and the legacies of the Cold War in social, geopolitical, and economic contexts. LEARN MORE »

JULY 29 - AUGUST 4

Alexander Hamilton and the Founding Era, July 29–August 4, 2018

RICHARD BROOKHISERLOCATION: NEW YORK UNIVERSITY

Examine the American Revolution and its aftermath, from the first stirrings in the late 1760s, through the establishment of the new Constitution and the first two-party system in the 1790s.LEARN MORE »

The Story of World War II, July 29–August 4, 2018

DONALD L. MILLERLOCATION: THE NATIONAL WWII MUSEUMIN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM

World War II is perhaps the greatest story—as well as the greatest catastrophe—in recorded history. Why was it fought? How was it fought? And how did it shape the world we live in?LEARN MORE »

The Gilded Age and Its Modern Parallels, July 29–August 4, 2018

RICHARD WHITELOCATION: STANFORD UNIVERSITY

Explore how the immigration, industrialization, and class struggle of the Gilded Age—from the end of the Civil War to roughly the turn of the twentieth century—created the foundation for the modern United States. LEARN MORE »