Discussions

Focusing on 19th-century U.S. cities—A new series of Early American Newspapers from the American Antiquarian Society

Readex is pleased to announce Early American Newspapers, Series 14, 1807-1880: The Expansion of Urban America. This newest series offers digital editions of notable 19th-century newspapers from America’s urban centers. It delivers long runs of 48 major titles published in 34 towns and cities in 15 states and D.C. Each title has been selected not only to represent the new forms of journalism that emerged during this period in U.S. history, but also to enable longitudinal studies.

Query: Harper Lee's father, Alabama journalism, and international topics ("Afghanistanism") in newspaper editorials

Dear Jhistorians, 

Doug Cumming just sent us a query from an Emory historian writing biography of Harper Lee:

 

Harper Lee's father was editor of weekly paper in Monroeville, Ala., in the 1930s and 40s, and a lot of his editorials were on international topics. The question is, was that unusual for a paper like that (e.g. small-town weekly, the South, the 30s?)

The following announcements from H-Net may be of interest to some Jhistory list members

The following announcements from H-Net may be of interest to some Jhistory list members

 

Call for Papers

Journal of Extension Education: Special Issue on “Agricultural Communication” 

Submission deadline: October 13, 2017

 

by Indira Chowdhury

Book reviews of interest to Jhistorians

The following are excerpted from H-Net reviews:

 

Reviewed for H-War by Bradley Cesario

   Fulwider, Chad R..  German Propaganda and U.S. Neutrality in

   World War I.  Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 2016.  288

   pp.  $60.00, ISBN 978-0-8262-2058-5.

http://www.h-net.msu.edu/reviews/showrev.php?id=46217

 

Reviewed for H-Caribbean by Susan Harewood

   Rivero, Yeidy M..  Broadcasting Modernity: Cuban Commercial

News and notes from elsewhere: Journalists and World War I; journalism history and digital archives; and 1968

The following announcements, culled from other H-Net lists as well as ICA's Communication History Discussion listserv, will interest JHistory subscribers. Please scroll down for information on a book review that touches on journalists in World War I, a call for papers for a special journal issue devoted to digital archives, and a call for conference papers for a 50-year retrospective on the turbulence of 1968.

 

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