H-War Content

Re: The Cult of the Warrior - Helpful or...Silly, or...Dangerous?

All: Here is a repost of an email that Captain (retired) Robert "Barney" Rubel, USN, sent to me on this issue after I forwarded him the discussion. Captain Rubel me to ensure everyone knew that he is "not a trained psychologist or sociologist, just a naval officer that observed some things." He is also the former Dean of the Center for Naval Warfare Studies at the Naval War College until about 2 years ago and the team lead for the Fleet Design Advisory Panel commissioned by the Chief of Naval Operations in2016-2017.

Re: The Cult of the Warrior - Helpful or...Silly, or...Dangerous?

Using a possibly false distinction I picked up years ago from an anthropologist, I think, but my memory is hazy, I have conceived of warriors as people who fight on behalf of their group (tribe, clan, etc) as a function of their social structure – essentially a tribal warrior in the classic sense.

Once you get into the creation of standing armies with its members being paid to apply violence, you are no longer talking about warriors, but soldiers.

Re: The Cult of the Warrior - Helpful or...Silly, or...Dangerous?

The latest posts on this thread suggest to me that 'warrior'—like ‘assault weapon’ or ‘toxic masculinity’—has become a synonym for ‘something I don’t like.’ ‘Warriors’ are war criminals, misogynists, and rapists; they are infantile, boastful, rash, unthinking, and ultimately dangerous to all we hold dear in democratic society!

This sort of dogmatic alienation is always easier than unpacking and analyzing a concept in its historical context and, in particular, in the context of an apparently eternal human nature.

Re: The Cult of the Warrior - Helpful or...Silly, or...Dangerous?

Greg, Stephen. and Jean:
Thank you for contributing and offering insightful comments on all accounts in what has developed into an interesting and productive (I think), thread.

Steve first, I confess to riffing on just this issue--ethos versus something else-- having written a previous hand grenade on the ethos part two years ago. I would argue (passive voice intentional), that the ethos piece precedes the development of a "warrior cult."
See Here:
https://networks.h-net.org/node/12840/blog/hand-grenade-week/132885/warr...

Re: The Cult of the Warrior - Helpful or...Silly, or...Dangerous?

Greg, Stephen. and Jean:
Thank you for contributing and offering insightful comments on all accounts in what has developed into an interesting and productive (I think), thread.

Steve first, I confess to riffing on just this issue--ethos versus something else-- having written a previous hand grenade on the ethos part two years ago. I would argue (passive voice intentional), that the ethos piece precedes the development of a "warrior cult."
See Here:
https://networks.h-net.org/node/12840/blog/hand-grenade-week/132885/warr...

Pages

H-War Book Reviews

Author: 
Alexander Watson
Reviewer: 
Matthew Lungerhausen

Lungerhausen on Watson, 'Ring of Steel: Germany and Austria-Hungary in World War I'

Alexander Watson. Ring of Steel: Germany and Austria-Hungary in World War I. New York: Basic Books, 2014. 832 pp. $40.00 (cloth), ISBN 978-0-465-01872-7.

Reviewed by Matthew Lungerhausen (Winona State University) Published on H-War (June, 2018) Commissioned by Margaret Sankey (Air War College)

Printable Version: http://www.h-net.org/reviews/showpdf.php?id=49520

Author: 
David R. Morse
Reviewer: 
Kenny Kolander

Kolander on Morse, 'Kissinger and the Yom Kippur War'

David R. Morse. Kissinger and the Yom Kippur War. Jefferson: McFarland, 2015. 216 pp. $35.00 (paper), ISBN 978-0-7864-9864-2.

Reviewed by Kenny Kolander (West Virginia University) Published on H-War (June, 2018) Commissioned by Margaret Sankey (Air War College)

Printable Version: http://www.h-net.org/reviews/showpdf.php?id=47671

Author: 
Jonathan Wyrtzen
Reviewer: 
Kristin Hissong

Hissong on Wyrtzen, 'Making Morocco: Colonial Intervention and the Politics of Identity'

Jonathan Wyrtzen. Making Morocco: Colonial Intervention and the Politics of Identity. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2016. Illustrations, maps. 352 pp. $45.00 (cloth), ISBN 978-1-5017-0023-1.

Reviewed by Kristin Hissong (Air University, Air Force Culture and Language Center) Published on H-War (June, 2018) Commissioned by Margaret Sankey (Air War College)

Author: 
George E. Melton
Reviewer: 
Bradley Cesario

Cesario on Melton, 'From Versailles to Mers el-Kébir: The Promise of Anglo-French Naval Cooperation, 1919-40'

George E. Melton. From Versailles to Mers el-Kébir: The Promise of Anglo-French Naval Cooperation, 1919-40. Washington, DC: Naval Institute Press, 2015. 288 pp. $42.95 (cloth), ISBN 978-1-61251-879-4.

Reviewed by Bradley Cesario (Texas A&M University) Published on H-War (June, 2018) Commissioned by Margaret Sankey (Air War College)

Author: 
Phil Porter
Reviewer: 
Gregory Michna

Michna on Porter, 'The Soldiers of Fort Mackinac: An Illustrated History'

Phil Porter. The Soldiers of Fort Mackinac: An Illustrated History. East Lansing: Michigan State University Press, 2018. 196 pp. $39.95 (cloth), ISBN 978-1-61186-281-2.

Reviewed by Gregory Michna (Arkansas Tech University) Published on H-War (June, 2018) Commissioned by Margaret Sankey (Air War College)

Printable Version: http://www.h-net.org/reviews/showpdf.php?id=52301