ANN: “Yon Lòt Ayiti Posib”: Glimmers of Another Haiti Following the 2010 Earthquake and 2016 Hurricane Matthew, by Mark SCHULLER, Bette GEBRIAN, and Judy LEWIS

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“Yon Lòt Ayiti Posib”: Glimmers of Another Haiti Following the 2010 Earthquake and 2016 Hurricane Matthew

Mark Schuller, Bette Gebrian, and Judy Lewis

 

Article Citation:

Mark Schuller, Bette Gebrian, and Judy Lewis (2019) “Yon Lòt Ayiti Posib”: Glimmers of Another Haiti Following the 2010 Earthquake and 2016 Hurricane Matthew. Human Organization: Winter 2019, Vol. 78, No. 4, pp. 267-277.

https://doi.org/10.17730/0018-7259.78.4.267

 

Disasters, Transborder Networks, and Local Community Response

 

“Yon Lòt Ayiti Posib”: Glimmers of Another Haiti Following the 2010 Earthquake and 2016 Hurricane Matthew

Mark Schuller, Bette Gebrian, and Judy Lewis

 

 

Mark Schuller is Associate Professor of Anthropology and Nonprofit and NGO Studies at Northern Illinois University and an affiliate at the Faculté d'Ethnologie. MPH/RN

Dr. Bette Gebrian is the co-founder and Executive Director of the Grand'Anse Health and Development Foundation.

Judy Lewis is professor emeritus of Community Medicine and Pediatrics at the University of Connecticut School of Medicine and a global health research and technical consultant.

Research, mainly within sociology, demonstrated that disasters can be stages for extraordinary human growth and solidarity. However, research documenting and specifically theorizing local communities as first responders has had limited impact within official disaster response policy and practice, and it is still relatively uncharted within anthropology. Policymakers and journalists alike tend to dismiss local initiatives. Ethnographic research is poised to evaluate the hypothesis of pro-social behavior following disasters and explore ramifications for policy and practice. This article aims to correct this erasure: documenting, analyzing, and theorizing the contributions of Haitian communities as first responders to two disasters, the 2010 earthquake and Hurricane Matthew, in 2016. Analyses from survivors offer glimpses of another Haiti imagined and temporarily brought into being following these events. An estimated 630,000 people left the capital following the earthquake for the provinces. This article focuses on the Grand'Anse, one of the most isolated provinces yet where a large number of people returned. The Grand'Anse was also one of the most affected by Hurricane Matthew. This article documents Haitian people's roles in saving their own and their neighbors' lives in an attempt to inspire disaster researchers to focus more attention on this critical if underacknowledged aspect of disaster response.

Keywords: DisastersHaitiHaiti-2010 earthquakeHurricane MatthewResilienceDisasters-Community ResponseVulnerabilitySolidarity

Read the article here: https://sfaajournals.net/doi/10.17730/0018-7259.78.4.267