Building Bridges over WBAI Radio, 99.5FM with Mimi Rosenberg & Ken Nash Mon., February 11, 7 - 9 pm EST       

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WBAI-FM Upcoming Program


Building Bridges

Mon, Feb 11, 2019   7:00 PM

THE HAITIAN REVOLUTION CONTINUES


Building Bridges over WBAI Radio, 99.5FM
with Mimi Rosenberg & Ken Nash
Mon., February 11, 7 - 9 pm EST       

 

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A Building Bridges Special  - 7 -9 PM
 
The Haitian Revolution's Contribution to Humanity: A Society Without Slavery, One of Universal and Unqualified Human Rights to Freedom
 
On January 1, 1804, Haiti's chief general Jean-Jacques Dessalines declared the independence of Haiti, thus indicating the birth of the first Black independent state in the history of the Western Hemisphere. The Haitian Revolution of 1791–1804, led also by Haiti's foremost general, Toussaint L'Ouverture, was the only triumphant slave revolution in world history, and stands as a symbol of anticolonial revolt and universal emancipation.
 
The slaves at Saint-Domingue who revolted against their masters in 1791 "invented decolonization", thus making Haiti "the first postcolonial state” in 1804. The major thesis of our extraordinary documentary is that the construction of a society without slavery, one of a universal and unqualified human right to freedom, properly stands as Haiti's unique contribution to humanity. It was Haiti that fulfilled the failed promises of both French and American Revolutions concerning the unqualified and universal human right to freedom and equality. Consequently, the Haitian Revolution has the utmost relevance for contemporary debates on human rights, ethics, and universalism.
 
We must finally learn the glorious history of this noble people and the way their struggle for freedom would be the single most important factor in shaping the geopolitical trajectory of the Western Hemisphere since Columbus.
 
"But the prejudice of race alone blinded the American people [to] the
debt they owed to the desperate courage of 500,000 Haitian Negroes
who would not be enslaved.” — Henry Adams, direct descendent of
John Adams and America’s foremost Historian of the 19th century.
 
Western historiography has silenced the Haitian revolution because it was necessary for the development of a hegemonic concept of Western modernity rooted in an ethics of differential and otherness.  The Western world disengaged the question of race, racial inequality, and the culture of slavery which it had created and which was necessary upon which to rest its developing economic system and its survival.  It is the revolutionary Haiti, the construction of a society without slavery, one of a universal and unqualified human right to freedom, that stands as Haiti’s unique contribution to humanity.  Consequently, the Haitian revolution has immeasurable importance and immediate relevance for contemporary debates on human rights, ethics and universalism.  The idea of 1804 goes beyond the politics of French Jacobinism and that Toussaint L’Ouverture transcends the conditions and confinements of Western political autonomy. 
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Tune in at 9 am Thursdays to Equal Rights and Justice hosted by Mimi Rosenberg
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In addition to being broadcast over WBAI,  99.5 FM in NYC and the tri-state area 7 - 8 pm EST Mondays, Building Bridges is syndicated to 50  broadcast and internet  radio stations in the US, Canada and the UK         

For more information: https://www.wbai.org/upcomingprogram.php?upcomingid=5336

The broadcast ran last night, but it's archived at https://www.wbai.org/archive.php. Select Building Bridges from the Display menu and click the Go button to the right of the menu. The archived broadcasts are organized with most recent at the top. You can just listen, or download the program in .mp3 format.

Thanks for posting this!