Wed. Aug. 5: Live webinar with Dr. Tera Hunter: Wartime Emancipation

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Wed. Aug. 5 @ 4 pm EDT: Dr. Tera Hunter in Conversation with The Journal of the Civil War Era

Register here: https://psu.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_7Ag-3IQQRgWBVc2U7z07Eg

This year, amid renewed discussion and celebration of Juneteenth, many people have questions about slavery's destruction during the Civil War. Dr. Hunter will discuss how enslaved people fought for their own freedom and that of their families; the relationship of the Emancipation Proclamation to Juneteenth; why there were so many emancipations; and the importance of gender and the family in the experience of emancipation.

Tera W. Hunter is the Edwards Professor of American History and Professor of African-American Studies, a specialist in the 19th and 20th centuries. Her research focuses on gender, race, labor, and Southern histories.

"Bound in Wedlock: Slave and Free Black Marriage in the Nineteenth Century" (Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2017) is her latest book. It is the winner of the Stone Book Award, Museum of African American History; Mary Nickliss Prize, Organization of American Historians; Joan Kelly Memorial Prize, American Historical Association; Littleton-Griswold Prize, American Historical Association; and The Deep South Book Prize, Frances S. Sumersell Center for the Study of the South. It was a finalist for the Lincoln Prize, Gettysburg College and the Gilder Lehrman Institute; and the Longman-History Today Book Prize.

Her first book, To ‘Joy My Freedom: Southern Black Women’s Lives and Labors After the Civil War, was awarded the H. L. Mitchell Award in 1998 from the Southern Historical Association, the Letitia Brown Memorial Book Prize in 1997 from the Association of Black Women’s Historians and the Book of the Year Award in 1997 from the International Labor History Association. The book was also named an Exceptional Book of 1997 by Library Booknotes, Bookman Book Review Syndicate.