CfP (seminar series) - Refugee times: seeking refuge in and beyond the 20th century

We are pleased to announce a new Partnership Seminar Series with the Institute of Historical Research, London, on Doing refugee history. Across a year and a half of seminars, this online series aims to create a new network of historians working on forced migration through time and space. 

We are currently seeking papers for spring/summer 2021, around the theme of Refugee times: seeking refuge in and beyond the 20th century

Refugees in African History - Quarterly Bulletin of Recent Publications 02-21

Dear subscribers to H-Net's Crossnetwork Refugees in African History,

we're exited to share with you our Quarterly Bulletin on Recent Publications, the first of a quarterly series of recent publications on the topic of refugees in African history. We welcome suggestions for publications to be included in the second bulletin until March 30, 2021, to africanrefugees@mail.h-net.org

 

2021-01 Quarterly Bulletin of Recent Publications

Dear all,

Happy New Year from the editorial team of the H-Net Crossnetwork "Refugees in African History"!

To kick of the new year, please find the first of a quarterly series of recent publications on the topic of refugees in African history below. We welcome suggestions for publications to be included in the March bulletin until February 15, 2021, to africanrefugees@mail.h-net.org .

CFP - International Journal (Routledge) African and Black Diaspora call for papers on "Migration, Human Trafficking, and Displacement in the Horn of Africa"

The Editors of African and Black Diaspora: An International Journal (Routledge) announce Call for Papers on Migration, Human Trafficking, and Displacement in the Horn of Africa.

 

Field Notes from Angola: Of Archived Archives and Anarchic Archives - A Blog Post by Marcia C. Schenck

Somewhere in sub-Saharan Africa, sometime in the new millennium: After a few days of negotiating my way into a provincial archive, the big day has finally come. The archivist opens the doors to an old shed, and, as my eyes become accustomed to the dusty dark, I discern the contours of a mountain of documents. “You can climb it and see whether you find anything that might interest you,” the archivist offers. And so I venture forth to mount the documents, picking up a few sheets here and there.

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