Kentucky Female School Superintendents Prior to School Suffrage in 1912

In 1912 the Kentucky General Assembly passed legislation giving literate women who otherwise met the same requirements as men, the right to vote in school elections. Sixty-one women in forty-eight counties were elected as County Superintendent of Schools in the years before this legislation was passed. Amanda T. Million was the first female superintendent in Kentucky. She was appointed in 1886 to fill her deceased husband’s unexpired term and was subsequently elected to the office twice.

Christian County Woman Suffrage League formed in Hopkinsville

An organizer for the National American Woman Suffrage Association hired by the Kentucky Equal Rights Association (KERA), Lily Ray Glenn came to Hopkinsville on April 16th during her 1914 tour across Kentucky to help start local chapters of the KERA. Much of her success was probably due to the fact that her father was from Todd County and she could make personal connections with Kentuckians. Before the large audience in the new Avalon assembly hall, Judge W.P.

Dolly Manire, Election Officer, Christian County, with ballot box

Image of Dolly (or Dollie) Frances Winsett Manire (6 November 1874 - 27 December 1965) with a ballot box. She served as Election Officer at the Haley’s Mill Precinct of Christian County, Kentucky from 1920 to 1957. She was married to Elder Jeptha Lemuel Manire of the Church of Latter Day Saints, with whom she had ten children. They both taught in the Christian County public schools and lived on a farm on Route 2 in Crofton, KY. This picture was taken by her daughter Eve Manire Jordan (1911–1998) and submitted to the Kentucky Woman Suffrage Project by granddaughter Flora Schaller.

Dolly Manire, Election Officer, Christian County

Image of Dolly (or Dollie) Frances Winsett Manire (6 November 1874 - 27 December 1965) as Election Officer at the Haley’s Mill Precinct of Christian County, Kentucky -- a position she held from 1920 to 1957. She was married to Elder Jeptha Lemuel Manire of the Church of Latter Day Saints, with whom she had ten children. They both taught in the Christian County public schools and lived on a farm on Route 2 in Crofton, KY. Picture taken by her daughter Eve Manire Jordan (1911–1998) and submitted to the Kentucky Woman Suffrage Project by granddaughter Flora Schaller.

African American Women and Suffrage in Louisville, A StoryMap with Biosketches

KY Woman Suffrage

We are very excited to introduce you to the new open access work by Dr. Carol Mattingly that provides great insight on the history of African American Women and Suffrage in Louisville. Dr. Mattingly, Professor Emerita of English at the University of Louisville, has been working for some time in a collaborative effort to find and collect together the evidence of African American women activism in Kentucky's largest city.

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