K-G1: A Plan proposed

Wyatt  Reader M.A.'s picture
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Not wishing to  harp particularly, but the Mcgregor book, read or not, as described does not seem to have understood the Kuwait, Gulf 1 war.

Have added a small homedrawn map of rough Kuwait dimensions which may help explain why Mcgregor seems irrelevent, especially in his offered critique of the conduct for US Armor. There are a coupple of things to note about this map and Kuwait itself.

First, Kuwait, the country, is shaped very much like a box, from memory. Its NE end offers a connection to Iraq going north. Off just to the East is a peninsula[or island?] which allows acess oat the chocke point for connecting to Iraq. Being a desert country the interior is mostly flat, plains like. Iraq set up a perimeter defense line east, north, south and southwest along its southern border.

Second there was not in occupation anything indicating an interior line of defense or depth to defense for this occupation. A proposed plan, like that shown here, called for assult in three directions. The southern armor approach heading into central Kuwait could draw any mobile reinforcement from Iraq into the center of the country thru the ne choke point. That would make it vulnerable to assualt from the east, over the peninsula zone, able to cut off any advance south from the rear. The western edge of Kuwait offered armor a path northward where it could turn ne and east  meet any force drawn into central Kuwait while the southern armor force would hold central Kuwait and fix in place any advance from Iraq. Over all of this Allied air could swarm tactically from all sides upon any columns and forces.

It was fortunate for Iraq their Republican Guards seem to haver realized this trap set for them should they move south to enter Kuwait. Mcgregor's mentioned critique seems highly without benefit for any kind of results given this offered plan, should it have been carried out by the Allied forces. His book, would again suggest, read or not, is basically not focused upon the success of an Allied, US effort. If this is the case, may be the points raised are not those which should be.