Teaching Confederate Monuments, Historical Memory

In tandem with the first post in a discussion series dedicated to following ongoing contests, debates, and discussions surrounding Confederate monuments named Confederate Symbols in Monument and Memory, teaching resources that investigate and contextualize the erection of monuments to Civil War participants provide a framework for teaching and learning.

Organizing Against Modern Slavery

Expanding on the sources provided in my initial post, some additions are provided below with brief descriptions of the organizations and their work. I hope to expand this list as new organizations are brought to attention or develop in response to new needs. Please share other institutions and organizations working to end modern forms of slavery not included here.

Organizing Against Modern Slavery

Expanding on the sources provided in my initial post, some additions are provided below with brief descriptions of the organizations and their work. I hope to expand this list as new organizations are brought to attention or develop in response to new needs. Please share other institutions and organizations working to end modern forms of slavery not included here.

"The University is a Ticking Time Bomb"

Thanks to Donald Rogers for passing this link along.

Aaron Hanlon's new article "The University is a Ticking Time Bomb" in the latest (April 26, 2019) CHE argues that the adjunctification of higher education is unsustainable not only because of unfair treatment of non-tenure track instructors, but also more importantly, because it undercuts the central function of higher education to advance knowledge by eroding a permanent and properly supported faculty that can create and teach that knowledge.  

Early Japan ethnography 1950s-60s (taidan), Plath - Vogel

Dear H-Japan readers,

With permission of the Midwest Japan Seminar, Japan Foundation and host at Ohio Wesleyan University, I'm sending the Youtube link to the hour-long conversation recently between long-time friends and colleagues, Prs. David Plath and Ezra Vogel. Hearing first-hand of their early years in the field and in Japanese Studies circles is eye-opening for one and all, no matter your scholarly generation or genealogy. Feel free to share widely with others.

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