Welcome to H-World, a network for practitioners of world history. The list gives emphasis to research, to teaching, and to the connections between research and teaching.

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CFP (graduate student conference): Citizenship in Flux: Migration and Exclusion in World History, 1750-2018 (UCSC Center for World History Graduate Conference, Santa Cruz, CA, April 12, 2019)

The UC Santa Cruz Center for World History is now accepting applications for papers or entire panels from presenters for our second annual graduate student conference, "Citizenship in Flux: Migration and Exclusion in World History, 1750-2018" to be held Friday, April 12, 2019 in Santa Cruz, CA. Since the early 2000s, the UCSC Center for World History has fostered a rich set of lectures, conferences, pedagogical workshops, and scholarly conversations in global, regional, and transnational histories.

Hakluyt Society Research Funding 2019: Deadline 31 January 2019

For the fourth year running, the Hakluyt Society in pleased to announce its annual round of Research Funding. In furtherance of the principal objects of the Hakluyt Society, to promote the study of historical exploration, travel, and worldwide cultural encounter, the Society operates two schemes of research funding. These are:

Re: Revisiting the Question of Pre-Columbian Contact between Mayan and Egyptian Cultures

'Hyperdiffusionist' is certainly a 'hyper-misunderstanding' of the course, since I stated that the course was interested in addressing the debates concerning the various views involved, 'debunked' or otherwise. Alongside the history of med, sci & tech in WH itself, I'm interested in helping students understand – among a number of other complex related issues – the historical development of the debates surrounding questions of contact & exchange versus independent development.

Re: Revisiting the Question of Pre-Columbian Contact between Mayan and Egyptian Cultures

Perhaps I misunderstand the objective of this particular course, but the description caught my attention. It reminds me a bit of hyperdiffusionism (not to be confused with diffusion). In the history of anthropology, as you may know, this debunked position is historically exemplified by the Egyptocentric (heliolithic) theory of Grafton Elliot Smith and W.J. Perry in the 1920s. Half a century later, an Afrocentric version appeared in Ivan van Sertima’s “They Came Before Columbus” (1976).

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