H-War Content

Re: The Cult of the Warrior - Helpful or...Silly, or...Dangerous?

Good hand grenade (strange to say, perhaps?). Yeah, I suggest we torpedo this misguided meme. Modern war involves too much killing from a distance to justify much support for the macho-centric "warrior cult." We need to look beyond the bluster to guys who quietly know how to get the job done. In my gunship squadron in Vietnam, the two most competent and respected pilots were both Mormon family men, very quiet guys indeed but their quiet confidence radiated out of the cockpit.

Re: The Cult of the Warrior - Helpful or...Silly, or...Dangerous?

The reality that I experienced with Marine infantry in Viet Nam was that most who were exposed to combat soon got over glory type thinking and "fearless warrior" fantasies, and became what I would refer to as soldiers, men doing the job as best they could, trying to stay alive and keep their comrades alive. A few were what I'd call professional soldiers, who had some studies of war, were devoted to it as a craft.

Re: Case Closed

Paul, I tend to agree. It was more case closed (period) than ...case closed (interrogative)? The revisionists seem to have given up, at least on H-WAR. But I suspect they haven't on H-DIPLO.

For example, no one (including me) ever really quite brought up the battle of dueling narratives, how one goes back into history to support one's agenda (or more usually understanding) of the present by interpreting particular historical events through the "lens of the present." I am thinking of something a long the lines of Lloyd Gardner's Architects of Illusion.

Re: Case Closed

I wonder why the argument for dropping the bomb has to be motivated by just the one reason, and not several. The argument, strident it is, that the bomb, was dropped only to end the war asap and save lives of American soldiers seems not the best historical reasoning. Why can't there be other reasons? Almost all the pro-drop-the-bomb to prevent Allied casualties appears to ignore, or beyond historical reason, the Soviet involvement in the Pacific War. The Pacific war did not end with the Emperor's broadcast on August 15.

Re: Case Closed

"I think Hasegawa's book makes clear that the Japanese were highly conscious of Russian involvement, and afraid of the prospect."

Why? Why would the Japanese in July or August 1945 be afraid of Russian involvement? I have always found this completely nonsensical, what did they think the Russians could do that the United States and its allies were not already doing?

Pages

H-War Book Reviews

Author: 
Alexander Watson
Reviewer: 
Matthew Lungerhausen

Lungerhausen on Watson, 'Ring of Steel: Germany and Austria-Hungary in World War I'

Alexander Watson. Ring of Steel: Germany and Austria-Hungary in World War I. New York: Basic Books, 2014. 832 pp. $40.00 (cloth), ISBN 978-0-465-01872-7.

Reviewed by Matthew Lungerhausen (Winona State University) Published on H-War (June, 2018) Commissioned by Margaret Sankey (Air War College)

Printable Version: http://www.h-net.org/reviews/showpdf.php?id=49520

Author: 
David R. Morse
Reviewer: 
Kenny Kolander

Kolander on Morse, 'Kissinger and the Yom Kippur War'

David R. Morse. Kissinger and the Yom Kippur War. Jefferson: McFarland, 2015. 216 pp. $35.00 (paper), ISBN 978-0-7864-9864-2.

Reviewed by Kenny Kolander (West Virginia University) Published on H-War (June, 2018) Commissioned by Margaret Sankey (Air War College)

Printable Version: http://www.h-net.org/reviews/showpdf.php?id=47671

Author: 
Jonathan Wyrtzen
Reviewer: 
Kristin Hissong

Hissong on Wyrtzen, 'Making Morocco: Colonial Intervention and the Politics of Identity'

Jonathan Wyrtzen. Making Morocco: Colonial Intervention and the Politics of Identity. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2016. Illustrations, maps. 352 pp. $45.00 (cloth), ISBN 978-1-5017-0023-1.

Reviewed by Kristin Hissong (Air University, Air Force Culture and Language Center) Published on H-War (June, 2018) Commissioned by Margaret Sankey (Air War College)

Author: 
George E. Melton
Reviewer: 
Bradley Cesario

Cesario on Melton, 'From Versailles to Mers el-Kébir: The Promise of Anglo-French Naval Cooperation, 1919-40'

George E. Melton. From Versailles to Mers el-Kébir: The Promise of Anglo-French Naval Cooperation, 1919-40. Washington, DC: Naval Institute Press, 2015. 288 pp. $42.95 (cloth), ISBN 978-1-61251-879-4.

Reviewed by Bradley Cesario (Texas A&M University) Published on H-War (June, 2018) Commissioned by Margaret Sankey (Air War College)

Author: 
Phil Porter
Reviewer: 
Gregory Michna

Michna on Porter, 'The Soldiers of Fort Mackinac: An Illustrated History'

Phil Porter. The Soldiers of Fort Mackinac: An Illustrated History. East Lansing: Michigan State University Press, 2018. 196 pp. $39.95 (cloth), ISBN 978-1-61186-281-2.

Reviewed by Gregory Michna (Arkansas Tech University) Published on H-War (June, 2018) Commissioned by Margaret Sankey (Air War College)

Printable Version: http://www.h-net.org/reviews/showpdf.php?id=52301