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Re: Popular Versus Scholarly Military History

I am an economist by trade and thus try to stay quiet in this forum. However, I would like to point out that this debate is not unique to history. Most branches of inquiry have a similar tension between scholarly and popular writing. Most have their good popular writers and their schlock ones. I think that perhaps the dividing line between scholarly and popular is that the scholars discuss how it is we know things, while the popular ones simply describe what we know (or think we know).

Re: Popular Versus Scholarly Military History

Throughout the Western World, military history has fallen out of focus with the civilian academia since the 1960s (if challenged, I will produce a reference for this!).

I'll take you up on that challenge to...ah...challenge you, largely because I'm interested in seeing the reference (as long as it's not John Miller from the National Review, who has published a fair bit of not great analysis on the situation).

Re: Re: Popular Versus Scholarly Military History

I agree with the definitions that David Silbey posits. Each has its strengths and reasons for existing. The question is which one is most needed at a given time and in what balance.

For me, there is now an imbalance on the scholarly side. When popular history was wide-spread and generally known to most educated adults, there was certainly a need for a deeper, sometimes oblique, scholarly form to broaden the discussion and make sure that a fuller range of perspectives were acknowledged.

Pages

H-War Book Reviews

Author: 
Luis M. Castañeda
Reviewer: 
Jesus Perez

Perez on Castañeda, 'Spectacular Mexico: Design, Propaganda, and the 1968 Olympics'


Luis M. Castañeda. Spectacular Mexico: Design, Propaganda, and the 1968 Olympics. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2014. xxvii + 301 pp. $105.00 (cloth), ISBN 978-0-8166-9076-3; $35.00 (paper), ISBN 978-0-8166-9079-4.

Reviewed by Jesus Perez (University of Oklahoma)
Published on H-War (February, 2016)
Commissioned by Margaret Sankey

Author: 
Brad Roberts
Reviewer: 
Paige P. Cone

Cone on Roberts, 'The Case for U.S. Nuclear Weapons in the 21st Century'


Brad Roberts. The Case for U.S. Nuclear Weapons in the 21st Century. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2015. 352 pp. $29.95 (paper), ISBN 978-0-8047-9713-9.

Reviewed by Paige P. Cone (University of South Carolina)
Published on H-War (February, 2016)
Commissioned by Margaret Sankey

Author: 
Mark Jarrett
Reviewer: 
Brian W. Refford

Refford on Jarrett, 'The Congress of Vienna and Its Legacy: War and Great Power Diplomacy after Napoleon'


Mark Jarrett. The Congress of Vienna and Its Legacy: War and Great Power Diplomacy after Napoleon. London: I.B. Tauris, 2013. 544 pp. $110.00 (cloth), ISBN 978-1-78076-116-9.

Reviewed by Brian W. Refford (Lehigh University)
Published on H-War (February, 2016)
Commissioned by Margaret Sankey

The Mixed Legacy of the Congress System

Author: 
Luis Martínez-Fernández
Reviewer: 
Lexi Baldacci

Baldacci on Martínez-Fernández, 'Revolutionary Cuba: A History'


Luis Martínez-Fernández. Revolutionary Cuba: A History. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2014. 408 pp. $44.95 (cloth), ISBN 978-0-8130-4995-3.

Reviewed by Lexi Baldacci (University of Florida)
Published on H-War (February, 2016)
Commissioned by Margaret Sankey

Author: 
Rolf-Dieter Müller
Reviewer: 
Robert Loeffel

Loeffel on Müller, 'Enemy in the East: Hitler's Secret Plans to Invade the Soviet Union'


Rolf-Dieter Müller. Enemy in the East: Hitler's Secret Plans to Invade the Soviet Union. London: I. B. Tauris, 2015. Illustrations, maps. 316 pp. $29.00 (cloth), ISBN 978-1-78076-829-8.

Reviewed by Robert Loeffel (University of New South Wales)
Published on H-War (January, 2016)
Commissioned by Margaret Sankey