H-Slavery has been a leading online forum for the academic study of slavery since its founding in 1995. H-Slavery serves as a focal point for informed, moderated discussion and produces diverse academic content including book reviews, blog posts, topical guides, and more. H-Slavery depends on an all-volunteer academic staff composed of scholars of all ranks. Scholars of all disciplinary, methodological, and topical backgrounds are welcome to set up a free subscription and to inquire about serving as an editor with H-Slavery. You can find us on Twitter @H_Slavery_HNet.

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Recent Content

From H-Net's Job Guide

The following jobs were posted to the H-Net Job Guide from 21 September 2020 to 28 September 2020.  These job postings are included here based on the categories selected by the list editors for H-Slavery.  See the H-Net Job Guide website at http://www.h-net.org/jobs/ for more information.  To contact the Job Guide, write to jobguide@mail.h-net.org, or call +1-517-432-5134 between 9 am and 5 pm US Eastern time.

Carnegie Mellon University - Assistant Professor in African

Opera historica 21 (2020), Nr. 1 Discussion on natural law and abolitionism

The new issue of the journal Opera historica 21 (2020), Nr. 1 brings a discussion on Dan Edelstein´s book on natural rights in France and abolitionism. The contributors include distinguished French historians Olivier Grenouilleau (expert on the slave trade and abolitionism), Thérence Carvalho (expert on the physiocrats), Emmanuelle de Champs (expert on Bentham´s legal philosophy), from the Czech historian Ivo Cerman (natural law) and responses from Dan Edelstein. 

From Twitter

This week in the twittersphere, scholars are working to piece together the story of the Underground Railroad to Mexico, a network that helped thousands of slaves escape to south of the border. Find out more here

Author: 
Alejandro de la Fuente, Ariela Julie Gross
Reviewer: 
Patrick Barker

Barker on Fuente and Gross, 'Becoming Free, Becoming Black: Race, Freedom, and Law in Cuba, Virginia, and Louisiana'

Alejandro de la Fuente, Ariela Julie Gross. Becoming Free, Becoming Black: Race, Freedom, and Law in Cuba, Virginia, and Louisiana. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2020. 294 pp. $24.95 (cloth), ISBN 978-1-108-48064-2

From H-Net's Job Guide

The following jobs were posted to the H-Net Job Guide from 4 September 2020 to 21 September 2020.  These job postings are included here based on the categories selected by the list editors for H-Slavery.  See the H-Net Job Guide website at http://www.h-net.org/jobs/ for more information.  To contact the Job Guide, write to jobguide@mail.h-net.org, or call +1-517-432-5134 between 9 am and 5 pm US Eastern time.

From H-Net's Job Guide

The following jobs were posted to the H-Net Job Guide from 7 September 2020 to 14 September 2020.  These job postings are included here based on the categories selected by the list editors for H-Slavery.  See the H-Net Job Guide website at http://www.h-net.org/jobs/ for more information.  To contact the Job Guide, write to jobguide@mail.h-net.org, or call +1-517-432-5134 between 9 am and 5 pm US Eastern time.

Lawrence University - Assistant Professor of 20th Century United

How an 1843 Will Shaped the Lives of Two Civil War Spies (x-posted from H-CivWar)

Over at H-CivWar, I have a recent blog post as part of their Authors' Blog that both builds on and diverges from another historian's reading of a particular document: an antebellum will that shaped the lives of two Civil War spies. The case involves issues of antebellum slavery.

From Twitter

This week in the twittersphere, Jesuits in St. Louis, Missouri, search for descendants of enslaved people forced to work at the St. Louis University, its church, and St. Stanislaus Seminary. Find out more here.

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