Welcome to H-SHGAPE, the online forum of the Society for Historians of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era and one of the founding networks on H-NET. H-SHGAPE seeks to encourage the study of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era through its network and online resources.

Please contact Jeremy C. Young, H-SHGAPE Network Editor-in-Chief, with questions, comments, or concerns. For book review queries, please contact the H-SHGAPE Book Review Editor, William S. Cossen.

H-SHGAPE was originally developed and maintained by Dr. Patrick Reagan, who deserves credit for assembling its wealth of information. Thanks are also due to Dr. Katherine Osburn (Editor-in-Chief, 2000-2016) and to the numerous GAPE scholars whose contributions in the form of syllabi, bibliographies, essays, and reviews make H-SHGAPE an invaluable resource for students and teachers.

Recent Content

Announcement of New Book Series in Intercultural Transfer Studies with Anthem Press

We invite authors from the humanities and social sciences to submit book proposals and manuscripts for our new book series in Intercultural Transfer Studies. We seek manuscripts that highlight the interconnected nature of the modern world since the fifteenth century. Book proposals and manuscripts should focus on the processes of intercultural contacts and transfers that shaped human societies and cultures. The intercultural transfer paradigm allows us to study phenomena within the space these phenomena created, and which cuts across national spaces.

Re: H-SHGAPE Question of the Week: Historical Figures from the GAPE

In reading about contemporary questions of political economy, I've found myself often returning to the journalist, economist, and politician Henry George.

I don't recall learning much about George earlier in my career -- surely not at all as an undergraduate, and as near as I can tell hardly at all in graduate school. Yet he was hugely important in his own day; indeed, in his lifetime he may have rivaled Karl Marx as the most influential political economist in English-speaking countries (though I guess it's hard to measure this).

Re: Question of the Week: Populism and a Usable Past

Hello Wes,

In multiple interviews over the last several years William Barber has referenced Populist-Republican "fusion." Some of these references are more aspirational than historical, but the successful political alliance in North Carolina between black Republicans and white Populists in the 1890s serves as the core of his argument for "fusion" politics today. He also has called for a "Third Reconstruction." Here is a link to an article Barber wrote titled "The New Fusion Politics":

https://www.uuworld.org/articles/new-fusion-politics

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