Welcome to H-SHGAPE, the online forum of the Society for Historians of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era and one of the founding networks on H-NET. H-SHGAPE seeks to encourage the study of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era through its network and online resources.

Please contact Chelsea Gibson, H-SHGAPE Network Editor-in-Chief, with questions, comments, or concerns. For book review queries, please contact the H-SHGAPE Book Review Editor, William S. Cossen.

H-SHGAPE was originally developed and maintained by Dr. Patrick Reagan, who deserves credit for assembling its wealth of information. Thanks are also due to Dr. Katherine Osburn (Editor-in-Chief, 2000-2016) and to the numerous GAPE scholars whose contributions in the form of syllabi, bibliographies, essays, and reviews make H-SHGAPE an invaluable resource for students and teachers.

Recent Content

Author: 
Treva B. Lindsey
Reviewer: 
Christopher Hayashida-Knight

Hayashida-Knight on Lindsey, 'Colored No More: Reinventing Black Womanhood in Washington, DC'

Treva B. Lindsey. Colored No More: Reinventing Black Womanhood in Washington, DC. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2017. 204 pp. $26.00 (paper), ISBN 978-0-252-08251-1.

Reviewed by Christopher Hayashida-Knight (California State University, Chico) Published on H-SHGAPE (April, 2018) Commissioned by William S. Cossen (H-SHGAPE Book Review Editor; The Gwinnett School of Mathematics, Science, and Technology)

Re: H-SHGAPE Question of the Week: Multi-media Sources for Gilded Age and Progressive Era

Since the Gilded Age and Progressive Era coincided with one of the great waves of immigration to the United States (over 20 million people migrated to the US between 1880 and 1920), I like to show my students clips from the 1986 animated movie An American Tale. This film provides examples of both "push" and "pull" factors that drove immigration to the US during these decades.

H-SHGAPE Question of the Week: Multi-media Sources for Gilded Age and Progressive Era

Welcome to H-SHGAPE's Question of the Week! Each Wednesday, the list editors will ask a question about the Gilded Age and Progressive Era that we hope will provoke lively discussion. We encourage you to share your thoughts by typing in the "Post a Reply" box below the original post, or, if you're getting this by email, by clicking on the "Read More or Reply" link.

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