Welcome to H-SHGAPE, the online forum of the Society for Historians of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era and one of the founding networks on H-NET. H-SHGAPE seeks to encourage the study of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era through its network and online resources.

H-SHGAPE was originally developed and maintained by Dr. Patrick Reagan, who deserves credit for assembling its wealth of information. Thanks are also due to the numerous GAPE scholars whose contributions in the form of syllabi, bibliographies, essays, and reviews make H-SHGAPE an invaluable resource for students and teachers. Scholars interested in contributing to updating these resources are encouraged to contact the web editor Christopher McKnight Nichols.

 

Recent Content

Author: 
Helen Zoe Veit
Reviewer: 
Jessica Herzogenrath

Herzogenrath on Veit, 'Modern Food, Moral Food: Self-Control, Science, and the Rise of Modern American Eating in the Early Twentieth Century'


Helen Zoe Veit. Modern Food, Moral Food: Self-Control, Science, and the Rise of Modern American Eating in the Early Twentieth Century. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2013. 300 pp. $39.95 (cloth), ISBN 978-1-4696-0770-2.

Reviewed by Jessica Herzogenrath
Published on H-SHGAPE (February, 2015)
Commissioned by Julia Irwin

An “American” Cuisine, Borne Out of Moral Discipline

Author: 
M. Keith Harris
Reviewer: 
Brian Donovan

Donovan on Harris, 'Across the Bloody Chasm: The Culture of Commemoration among Civil War Veterans'


M. Keith Harris. Across the Bloody Chasm: The Culture of Commemoration among Civil War Veterans. Conflicting Worlds: New Dimensions of the American Civil War Series. Baton Rouge: Lousiana State University Press, 2014. 232 pp. $42.50 (cloth), ISBN 978-0-8071-5772-5.

Reviewed by Brian Donovan
Published on H-SHGAPE (February, 2015)
Commissioned by K. Stephen Prince

A House Still Divided

AHA 2016 Annual Meeting: Panel Search

I am looking for other panelists (and possibly a chair) to assemble a panel for the American Historical Association annual meeting in Atlanta, January 2016. My research focuses on public health and immigration in Progressive-era New York City. Specifically, I'd like to discuss a rancorous and very public battle between Jacob Riis and a little-known Catholic priest whose parish occupied the site of a proposed park in the 1900s.

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